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Archive for May, 2012

Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 11 Endometriosis and Your Infertility

By David Kreiner, MD

May 31st, 2012 at 2:00 pm

 

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Eleven: Endometriosis and Your Infertility. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.eastcoastfertility.com/?p=70

Endometriosis and Your Infertility 

Endometriosis is caused by tissue which is normally lining the inside of the uterine cavity.  Instead it implants outside the uterus, most often in the lining of the pelvis or ovaries.  Five to ten per cent of women have endometriosis, though of infertile women 30% are afflicted with it. 

Scar tissue often forms where the endometriosis implants grow that can exacerbate pain and increase the likelihood of infertility.  The only way to be certain when making a diagnosis is to perform a surgical procedure called a laparoscopy which allows your physician to look inside the abdominal cavity with a narrow tubular scope.  Absent a laparoscopy, the appearance of an ovarian cyst with a characteristic homogeneous appearance showing echoes in the cyst is highly suspicious for endometriosis. 

Women with any stage of endometriosis, from minimal (few small implants) to severe (cysts and scarring), can have severe lower abdominal and pelvic pain or they may have no pain whatsoever.  In the absence of scarring, it is thought that infertility caused by mild stages of endometriosis may be chemically transmitted perhaps affecting sperm motility, fertilization, embryo development or even implantation. 

Treatment is individualized based on symptoms, infertility and whether a woman is interested in future fertility.  Medical or drug therapy (usually monthly depot lupron) can suppress endometriosis and relieve pain in many women especially when dealing with the milder stages of endometriosis.    Surgical removal of lesions and/or ablation may also reduce pain temporarily.  However, studies fail to show significant improvement in pregnancy rates as compared to expectant management in these mild stages.  Ovulation induction with intrauterine insemination (IUI) increases conception when no other significant fertility factors are present. 

Surgical treatment of more advanced conditions of endometriosis improves pregnancy rates to about two per cent per month.  There remains controversy over whether postoperative medical treatment may be helpful for fertility as the greatest success of surgery exists in the first 6 to 12 months post-op and the medical therapy reduces the time a patient may conceive as they cannot ovulate with the usual therapy of lupron.  IUI is rarely successful in these advanced stages necessitating In Vitro Fertilization in order to conceive. 

As endometriosis is a progressive condition it is recommended that women so afflicted become proactive with their procreation before the endometriosis destroys too much ovarian tissue and prevents them from being able to achieve a pregnancy with their own eggs. 

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about Endometriosis and its effects on a woman’s fertility?

 

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions.

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NWW Photo Caption Contest No. 22

By Tracey Minella

May 30th, 2012 at 6:38 pm

 

In honor of National Donut Day this week, we’re going back to our normal NWW format and giving away a Dunkin Donuts gift card. Some of our regulars either didn’t read through last week’s post and realize we changed it up for last week…or they couldn’t top my awesome caption! So, the Starbucks is mine this week, guys!

Now on to Nearly Wordless Wednesday… our weekly wacky photo caption contest where anyone anywhere can enter to win by submitting a clever caption for the photo of the week. And what infertile couple, or generally stressed out person, can’t use a fun distraction once a week? Come on and play!

Each week, the winner gets a gift card. It’s our little thank you for playing our game.

This week’s contest winner will get a Dunkin Donuts gift card. Come on and play. It’s  National Donut Day this week, so what will you choose if you win? The gift card is yours to choose your favorite!

Now, on to this week’s challenge.

Since we’re coming off the Memorial Day weekend and have soldiers on our minds, here’s a great photo to caption any way you like…but those that are (tastefully) funny and touch on infertility may have an edge.

Give this photo a caption on the blog.

Best entry winner gets Dunkin Donuts on us! It’s a fast, fun and free contest open to anyone, whether infertile or not, and whether a patient of our practice or not.

Bookmark our blog or like us on Facebook and check back next week to see if you won and we’ll mail you your gift card.

Plus, if you “LIKE” us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/longislandivf , we may be able to send you the prize as an e-gift right through Facebook, depending on what this week’s prize is, so you could be enjoying your winnings as early as on the day we choose the winner! (And as much as we’d love you to “LIKE” us on Facebook, it is absolutely not required to either enter or win our contests! But did I mention we’d love it if you did ;-)

Enter today! Or at least before next Tuesday!

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Why not bookmark us so you remember to check back often…at least every Wednesday…so you don’t miss our NWW contests. And we also run bigger contests, too. Please feel free to suggest other fun places we could get gift cards from that you’d like to win as prizes for these fun contests or topics you’d like to see discussed on the blog. Now go enter the contest!

Photo credit: http://www.killmydaynow.com/2011/03/funny-pictures-of-bad-parenting-part-3-58-pics.html/

 

 

 

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Ethical, Moral and Legal IVF Factors

By David Kreiner MD, Tracey Minella

May 29th, 2012 at 9:35 pm

 

If you think that all fertility patients look like your average young urban professional neighbors with the SUV, think again. They are as diverse as the general population.

Actually, anyone can be infertile. There could be a reality show called “The Real Infertile Housewives of Long Island”. When the door swings open and a potential new patient walks in, infertility doctors never know what they’re gonna get. Often, it’s a so-called “traditional” married couple using their own eggs and sperm or those of a donor. It could also be an equally welcome gay couple or single woman using donor eggs and or sperm. But often enough… it’s not. And sometimes, it’s downright ugly and complicated.

Must he treat them? Should he treat them? Often, the legal system muddies the waters.

Dr. Kreiner of Long Island IVF gives us a glimpse of what it’s like to be on his side of the desk at a new patient appointment. Here’s a post he wrote prior to New York’s  legalization of same sex marriages:

Those of us who work in the infertility field are often presented with situations that make us ponder whether we should assist in endeavors that make us feel a bit, well, uncomfortable. I suppose it’s common to have these experiences in our field as family building is a cornerstone of our society. But manipulating a family affects not just the people directly involved, but all of us.

There are the straightforward illegal and unethical cases: The married woman who presents with a proposal to conceive with a man other than her husband (without the husband’s consent) or the married man “donating” his sperm to a “friend” other than his wife (without his wife’s knowledge). These are the easy ones that don’t even make me pause.

I come across more difficult questions, however, that require much more intense contemplation and research. On a daily basis, the way most of us professionals try to deal with ethical and legal dilemmas is to resort to an evaluation of the “yuk factor.” It’s an internal cliff notes version of societal morality and law that many of us professionals rely on to make daily decisions when we can’t read the whole book on an issue. Sure, there’s a potential downside of going down the slippery “yuk” slope, but when was the last time the approach “if you’d be ashamed to see it on the front page of the New York Times, then don’t do it” led you down the wrong path?

Yet, I still have difficulty understanding what’s ethically and/or legally right in some situations. The go-ahead is clear to me if an unmarried man and woman present as a couple, each using their own gametes, and both sign consent acknowledging their rights and responsibilities to the future child. Less obvious is the case of the unmarried lesbian couple who present with only one partner participating biologically. They live as a couple, but the law doesn’t necessarily recognize the partner who isn’t participating biologically as having parental rights. Should they be signing as a couple for use of donor sperm to create a baby and, if so, what –if any– are the ramifications? Is this situation different if the unmarried-yet-cohabiting partner who is not participating is a male? Does the unmarried lesbian partner have the right to adopt the baby? Does this change if the partner is a transsexual?

It would seem to me that if the couple decides that they will have a baby together, despite the fact that only one is contributing biologically, that there should be parity recognized legally based on the emotional and financial contributions the other partner makes, especially if she were willing to adopt the child and legally take on parental rights. For me the “yuk” factor becomes the legal system if that unmarried partner who is unable to contribute biologically is unable to retain parental rights in a split.

So now I’m off to the clinic to see what murky issues the day will present.

Every day is different.

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Do you think there are situations where a doctor can, should, or must refuse treatment? If so, when?

Photo credit: http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=10714&picture=halloween-wedding

 

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Find Gratitude and Hope on Memorial Day

By Tracey Minella

May 28th, 2012 at 8:12 am

 

Finally, a holiday that doesn’t absolutely require your presence at a family event. Just a day off to relax…something we all need.

Sure you may be invited to a barbeque, but bailing on it is more acceptable than, say, ditching Christmas Day. So, feel free to bail on it if you don’t want to be grilled. You come first. The family will simply have to live without your fabulous 7 layer dip.

After all, today is really about taking time to remember those heroes who’ve made the ultimate sacrifice so that we can live in and enjoy the freedom we do. And when you focus on the idea that people have given their lives for us…really focus on it… it can free you from feeling sorry for yourself for just one day.  It can bring out feelings of gratitude and hope…feelings that can be very hard to find on an infertility journey.

Think about that. A stranger – countless strangers, actually — gave his life for you. His mother, wife and children will never see or hold him again. Think of the female soldiers, too, many who died before becoming mothers. Whatever dreams they may have had for their future will not come true.

I’m not trying to make you cry here. Just trying to get in touch with your inner gratitude and hope. You have family and friends who love you (even if they seem to do or say the wrong things lately). And you have hope for the future. Hope to realize that dream of the family you’ve always wanted.

Whatever you do today, please take a moment to remember what you DO have, and why you have it. And be grateful that the dream that brings you to this page is something that is not only possible in this country, but grows more reachable each day due to advances in ART technology.

But most of all take care of yourself… and your heart… today. Because there is hope for tomorrow.

And to our patients, past and present, who are or who love someone in the military, Long Island IVF thanks you from the bottom of our hearts for your sacrifices and courage.

Don’t forget to enter your essay or video in our Extreme Family Building Makeover Contest. See the April 23, 2012 blog post for entry details.

YOU COULD WIN A FREE MICRO-IVF CYCLE VALUED AT $ 3,900.00!!!

And check back later this week as we announce the winners of the first early bird entry for May!! There’s still time to get your entry in for May early bird consideration.

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What are you doing for Memorial Day? And if you are going to be around people who “grill” you about having a baby, what’s your comeback strategy?

Photo credit: http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=21971&picture=national-cemetery

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 10 Endometriosis

By David Kreiner MD

May 25th, 2012 at 3:42 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Ten: Endometriosis. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here:

http://podcast.eastcoastfertility.com/?p=66

 

Endometriosis

 

Endometriosis is a disease state in which the lining of the uterus, endometrium, is found outside the uterus, most often lining the pelvis behind the uterus and by the ovaries.  Endometriosis can cause pain and/or infertility in some women.  Among women who have infertility, as many as 30% may have endometriosis and this is not always associated with pain.

 

Though cysts of endometriosis may be suspected by a pelvic ultrasound, the diagnosis is typically made at the time of a laparoscopy by visual inspection and biopsy.  Endometriosis may be minimal or mild with no more than flat implants noted in the pelvic lining.  These are thought to contribute to infertility through chemicals that these implants produce which can cause scarring or adhesions of the ovaries and fallopian tubes thus affecting egg pickup by the tubes.  They may affect egg/embryo transport down the tube, sperm motility, fertilization, embryo cell cleavage and implantation.

 

Moderate and Severe endometriosis involving ovarian cysts containing old blood from cycles of menstrual-like bleeding from the implants, commonly impact egg pickup by the tubes due to the scar tissue that they cause.  They could affect egg maturation as well as cause all of the other factors that mild endometriosis may cause.

 

Treatment should be tailored to the major problems caused by the endometriosis. 

 

When pain is the main issue, medication that suppresses ovulation and estrogen production may be helpful, as can surgical resection or vaporization of the implants.

 

When infertility is the main issue, the benefits of surgery and medicine must be compared to the downside limitations caused by them, such as the inability to conceive during medical therapy and the risk of destroying limited normal ovarian tissue along with the endometriosis.  This can be a particular issue in cases of more severe endometriosis where the cysts of endometriosis and prior surgery to resect them have already diminished the remaining ovarian reserve.  In such cases, aggressive fertility treatment such as In Vitro Fertilization would be the recommended course of therapy to optimize an individual’s chance for successful childbearing.   

 

Patients with endometriosis and infertility are unfortunately in a race to conceive before the endometriosis destroys too much ovarian tissue and makes achieving a pregnancy with one’s own eggs impossible.

 

 

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about Endometriosis and its effects on a woman’s fertility?

 

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions

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American Idol Finale or Long Island IVF Reunion Luncheon?

By Tracey Minella

May 24th, 2012 at 3:35 pm

 

It felt like the American Idol Finale here at Long Island IVF yesterday. Screaming crowds in the aisles. Electricity in the air. Who could stand the excitement? Surely Jessica Sanchez or Phillip Phillips was in the house, no?

Nope…just some of Long Island IVF’s own “rock stars”… Drs. Brenner, Kreiner, and Pena. And the wildest, passionate fans anyone could ever ask for.

Well, American Idol had nothing on this crowd. It was a packed house of proud new parents and their strollers full of chubby cuteness as Long Island IVF held its somewhat soggy annual family reunion luncheon for the 2011 IVF babies, complete with its first “Every Baby’s Beautiful Pageant Parade”.

True, Mother Nature was a loser for letting the rain loose at exactly 12:02 and sending our newest babies and their parents running for cover. But IVF parents are nothing if not resilient fighters. So, the party was quickly moved to LIIVF’s nearby Plainview office.

The celebration of new miracles continued with a fabulous lunch and was capped off with our little Pageant Parade throughout the Plainview office. We found that a blue carpet works as well as the soggy red one we had to abandon in the rain. And a giant tub full of beanie babies is at home anywhere. So, a good time was had by all. (Big thanks to Lindsay and her husband and helpers for tons of hard work behind the scenes running this whole thing!)

I remember my very first reunion as a new IVF parent and how the dream of attending it someday often kept me going during my longer than average infertility journey. I would have been happy to be anywhere showing off my baby and thanking the doctors and staff that helped build my family.

Thanks to all the great patients who came out to show us their miracles…it reminded us of why we do what we do every day.

And it’s not every day we have a waiting room full of babies! But we’re getting closer!

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If you’ve ever come to one of the reunion luncheons, what was the best part for you? If you have any photos of your reunion, please feel free to share them on our Facebook page!

Photo credit: Big Buzz Communications

 

 

 

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American Idol Finale Inspires “NWW Caption Idol” at Long Island IVF

By Tracey Minella

May 23rd, 2012 at 7:47 pm

 

"Daniel-Son, look eye. Always look eye."

 

American Idol fever has gripped the nation, and Long Island IVF has been inspired by the frenzy! So we are tweaking our regular Nearly Wordless Wednesday rules today.

For those that don’t know, NWW is our weekly wacky photo caption contest where anyone anywhere can enter to win by submitting a clever caption for the photo of the week. And what infertile couple, or generally stressed out person, can’t use a fun distraction once a week? Come on and play! Every week is a new photo and new chance to win!!

Each week, the winner gets a gift card. It’s our little thank you for playing our game.

This week’s contest winner will get a Starbucks gift card. Come on and play. What tall, vente, grande treat will you choose if you win? Win and the gift card is yours to choose your favorite!

But first let’s announce last week’s winner: LM! Congrats!

Remember that train packed inside…and out…with hundreds of people? Well, we liked LM’s: “Bieber fever hits Mumbai” caption best.

LM, please email your address and the words “NWW Contest #20-Starbucks” to Lindsay at lmontello@liivf.com to claim your gift card.

Now, on to this week’s challenge.

This week, in honor of the American Idol finale, we’re changing it up a bit.

It’s going to be CAPTION IDOL WEEK!

Instead of just captioning the photo like you usually do, this week you have to post a better caption than the one I gave it. And readers will vote on/like their favorite one. If one of yours beats mine, the most liked one wins. BUT if mine is more popular, then I will be the “Starbucks Nazi” this week and tell you next Wednesday…”No Starbucks for you!”

Who will be wearing that Caption Idol crown next Wednesday…and who will go home? ;-)

Bookmark our blog or like us on Facebook and check back next week to see if you won and we’ll mail you your gift card.

Plus, if you “LIKE” us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/longislandivf , we may be able to send you the prize as an e-gift right through Facebook, depending on what this week’s prize is, so you could be enjoying your winnings as early as on the day we choose the winner! (And as much as we’d love you to “LIKE” us on Facebook, it is absolutely not required to either enter or win our contests! But did I mention we’d love it if you did ;-)

Enter today! Or at least before next Tuesday!

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Why not bookmark us so you remember to check back often…at least every Wednesday…so you don’t miss our NWW contests. And we also run bigger contests, too. Please feel free to suggest other fun places we could get gift cards from that you’d like to win as prizes for these fun contests or topics you’d like to see discussed on the blog. Now go enter the contest!

Photo credit: http://www.funtal.com/picdetail.php?catId=11&tid=466

 

 

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Cryopreservation: A Look into the IVF Freezer

By Tracey Minella and David Kreiner MD

May 22nd, 2012 at 5:00 pm

 

Remember the Good Humor man? You’d hear that sound from blocks away and bolt out the door barefoot, shrieking “STAAAPPP!” arms flailing, and being joined by the rest of the block like rats to the Pied Piper.

Remember the way the white square door with the chunky silver hinge on the back swung open and all that cold, smoky fog billowed out into the humid air?

Remember the frozen magic inside?

Well, Long Island IVF has a magic freezer, too. Full of dreams. Full of potential. Full of embryos that may one day turn out to be sweaty maniacs running after the ice cream man.

 In fact, Long Island IVF’s freezer once held the frozen embryo that turned out to be Long Island’s very first cryo baby! Let’s revisit an earlier post by Dr. Kreiner which lets us take a peek inside the freezer of Long Island’s first successful cryopreservation program:

In 1985, my mentors, Drs. Howard W. Jones Jr. and his wife Georgeanna Seegar Jones, the two pioneers of in-vitro fertilization in the USA and the entire western hemisphere, proposed the potential benefits of cryopreserving or freezing embryos following an IVF cycle. They predicted that cryopreserving embryos for future transfers would increase the overall success rate of IVF and make the procedure more efficient and cost effective. They also suggested that it would reduce the overall risks of IVF. For example, one fresh IVF cycle might yield many embryos which can be used in future frozen embryo transfer cycles, if necessary. This helps to limit the exposure to certain risks confronted only in a fresh IVF cycle such as the use of injectable stimulation hormones, the egg retrieval operation, and general anesthesia.

At East Coast Fertility [now merged with Long Island IVF], we are realizing the Joneses’ dream of safer, more efficient and cost effective IVF. By utilizing the ability to cryopreserve embryos in 2007, 61.5% (118/192) of patients under 35 were successful in having a live birth as a result of only one egg stimulation and retrieval cycle! In addition, because of our outstanding Embryology Laboratory, we are usually able to transfer as few as 1 or 2 high quality embryos per cycle and avoid risky triplet pregnancies. In fact, since 2002, the only triplet pregnancies we have experienced have resulted from the successful implantation of two embryos, one of which goes on to split into identical twins (this is rare!). By cryopreserving embryos in certain high-risk circumstances, we are able to vastly reduce the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome requiring hospitalization. At Long Island IVF, the safety of our patients comes first. Fortunately, our success with frozen embryo transfers is equivalent to that of fresh embryo transfers, so that pregnancy rates are not compromised in the name of safety, nor are the babies.

As recently reported in the Daily Science: “The results are good news as an increasing number of children, estimated to be 25% of assisted reproductive technology (ART) babies worldwide, are now born after freezing or vitrification” (a process similar to freezing that prevents the formation of ice crystals).

The study, led by Dr Ulla-Britt Wennerholm, an obstetrician at the Institute for Clinical Sciences,SahlgrenskaAcademy(Goteborg,Sweden), reviewed the evidence from 21 controlled studies that reported on prenatal or child outcomes after freezing or vitrification.

She found that embryos that had been frozen shortly after they started to divide (early stage cleavage embryos) had a better, or at least as good, obstetric outcome (measured as preterm birth and low birth weight) as children born from fresh cycles of IVF (in vitro fertilization) or ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection). There were comparable malformation rates between the fresh and frozen cycles. There were limited data available for freezing of blastocysts (embryos that have developed for about five days) and for vitrification of early cleavage stage embryos, blastocysts and eggs.

Slow freezing of embryos has been used for 25 years and data concerning infant outcome seems reassuring with even higher birthweights and lower rates of preterm and low birthweights than children born after fresh IVF/ICSI. For the newly introduced technique of vitrification of blastocysts and oocytes, very limited data have been reported on obstetric and neonatal outcomes. This emphasises the urgent need for properly controlled follow-up studies of neonatal outcomes and a careful assessment of evidence currently available before these techniques are added to daily routines. In addition, long-term follow-up studies are needed for all cryopreservation techniques,’ concluded Dr Wennerholm.

The use of frozen embryos has become a common standard of care in most IVF Programs. At Long Island IVF, we are able to keep multiple pregnancy rates down – by only transferring one or two embryos at a time – while allowing patients to hold on to the additional embryos that they may have created during the fresh cycle. It is like creating an insurance plan for patients. We developed a unique financial incentive program using the technology of cryopreservation to encourage patients to transfer only one healthy embryo at a time.

In order to ensure the best outcome for mother and child – these special pricing plans take the burden off the patient to pay for the additional transfers and the cryopreservation process. We have eliminated the cost of cryopreservation, storage and embryo transfer for patients in the single embryo transfer program. Thus, patients no longer have that financial pressure to put all their eggs in one basket! We truly believe we are practicing the most successful, safe and cost effective IVF utilizing cryopreservation.

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Did you know before today that Long Island IVF is the home of Long Island’s first cryo baby? Or that Dr. Kreiner and Dr. Kenigsberg co-founded Long Island IVF  way back in 1988–back when most of you reading this were very little kids or teens?

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Long Island IVF’s “Every Baby’s Beautiful Pageant Parade”-MOVED TO RAINDATE!!

By Tracey Minella

May 21st, 2012 at 1:58 pm

 

At Long Island IVF, we love reunions. We love seeing the most recent batch of our beautiful babies every year at this time. But we’re not fond of the rain…

IN LIGHT OF THE FORECAST, WE’VE ALREADY DECIDED TO MOVE THE REUNION AND PAGEANT PARADE TO THIS WEDNESDAY, MAY 23, 2012.  PLEASE HELP US SPREAD THE WORD BY SHARING THIS ON YOUR FACEBOOK.

We wish we could have a reunion with ALL of our babies at once. But when you think of the sheer volume of children …many young adults now… conceived since we brought Long Island its first IVF baby shortly after our founding in 1988, well we’d need a super big place! And the Nassau Coliseum is probably taken!

So, since every baby’s beautiful at Long Island IVF, we decided it’d be fun to hold our first “Every Baby’s Beautiful Pageant Parade” for the boys and girls born through IVF in 2011. That is, of course, as long as it doesn’t rain on our parade! None of the Toddlers and Tiaras competitive nonsense here! Just a fun little stroll…or roll…down the red carpet! Every baby’s a winner!

Please come down with your little miracles and show off! This is what it’s all about…celebrating the life of your little miracle and your dream come true.

And be sure to check in on the Long Island Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/longislandivf before you head on over on Wednesday if the weather looks bad. Updated information will be there if it gets postponed again. And while you’re at it, why not just “LIKE” our Facebook page if you haven’t already?!

Here’s the scoop:

What: LIIVF’s “Every Baby’s Beautiful” Luncheon and Pageant
Where: Syosset-Woodbury Community Park, Area “B,” Jericho Turnpike, Woodbury, NY 11797 (Across from the Fox Hollow Inn)
When: Tuesday, May 22,  Wednesday, May 23, noon to 2 p.m.

All family members of LIIVF babies born in 2011 are welcome at the reunion and pageant parade.

For more information or to RSVP, contact: Lindsay Montello at lmontello(at)liivf(dot)com or 516-939-BABY (2229).

Hope to see you all there!

Photo credit: http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=18939&picture=driving-away

 

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Spending a Beautiful Weekend at the Fertility Clinic

By Tracey Minella

May 20th, 2012 at 12:13 am

 

Finally, the warm weather has arrived. The bulky sweaters have been shed (we won’t mention winter’s added pounds that need to go with them!)

And where are you on this sunny Sunday morning?

Stuck in the R.E.’s office being, well…stuck.

Stuck with a sono wand. Stuck with a needle. Stuck listening to the cries of another woman’s child as she sits in the waiting room trying to complete her family.

Well, how can we put a positive spin on this?

First, tell yourself that there is nothing… nothing… more important to be doing than what you are doing right now. Seriously, creating a baby trumps a barbeque any day. Tap into the hope that is around you. The promise of potential success. Embrace it.

Then, remind yourself that while it’s unfair that you have to go through all of this to have a child (when others can flirt and get pregnant), that you are luckier than those who need the same treatment but either have no insurance coverage or cannot afford it. Yes, it’s a small consolation, and it’s still a huge financial sacrifice, but it’s an opportunity that some don’t have. If you try to look at it that way, it may take some of the sting off.

Now, plan to make the most of the remainder of the day. Get out and do something in the sun. Vitamin D from the sun can even give your fertility a boost! Maybe do some planting or gardening. Some people love growing things and getting in touch with nature. (Plus digging is a great stress release!)

Maybe something more relaxing is more your speed? Read a book outside, walk on the beach. Get those toes in the sand. Consider a pampering pedicure. Go wild with a toe ring. Even something as small as that can give you a boost.

The point is to take some time for yourself. Do some positive visualization. Maybe even enter our Extreme Family-Building Makeover Contest and try to win the Grand Prize of a free micro-IVF cycle valued at $3,900.00! See entry details on the April 23, 2012 blog post! 

And remember…there are worse places to be spending a few hours on a Sunday afternoon…you could be stuck at a baby shower.

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What do you do on the weekends during treatment? Any rewards? Any tips on how to get through weekends at the doctor’s office?

Photo credit: http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=2071&picture=toes-in-the-sand

 

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