CALL US AT: (877) 838.BABY


Archive for July, 2013

Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 23: Nominated for Best Supporting Role Is…

By David Kreiner MD

July 30th, 2013 at 9:16 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Twenty-Three: Nominated for Best Supporting Role Is… You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=122

Nominated for Best Supporting Role Is…

Superficially, the role of the male partner in IVF is to produce a semen specimen… at least in those cases not utilizing sperm from a donor. This is not trivial and in fact when the partner is unsuccessful the cycle is lost. For this reason, I recommend freezing a specimen before the retrieval that is available as back up.

 

However, the male’s role can and should be much more than producing a specimen on the day of retrieval.  Those couples that appear to deal best with the stress of IVF are ones that do it together. 

 

Many men learn to give their partners injections.  It helps involve them in the efforts and give them some degree of power over the process. They can relate better to what their partners are doing and take pride in contributing towards the common goal of achieving a baby.  The more involved a partner is the more support that is felt by the patient which is not only good for her emotionally but also helps in getting accurate information and directions from the office. It also helps to solidify their relationship. 

 

My recommendation is for partners to be as involved as possible.  In their absence a surrogate such as a friend, sister, or mother is far better than dealing with the office visits and procedures alone.

 * * * * * * **  * * * *

Was this helpful in answering your questions about the partner’s role in IVF?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions, which Dr. Kreiner will answer.

no comments

Fertile Food Friday– Tomato

By Tracey Minella

July 26th, 2013 at 2:40 pm

 

Welcome back to Long Island IVF’s “Fertile Food Fridays”*! This is our fourth week of focusing on foods that can potentially boost male or female fertility. If you missed them, be sure to check out our first three featured foods…avocados, blueberries, and red meat…covered the past few Fridays.

Last Friday it was just too hot to cook! So make sure you check out our Facebook post on 10 awesome and healthy homemade popsicles. http://on.fb.me/1e0GGqA Yes, popsicles. It’s what’s for dinner.

You’re going to love what’s featured today…Tomatoes.

My friend, Patty, is an inspiration. Each year at the end of the summer, she and her extended Italian family spend a weekend in the backyard canning their own fresh tomatoes to use in their weekly Sunday sauce all year long. It’s an assembly line production that runs like a well-oiled machine, involving each family member from the youngest to the oldest…spanning 80 years and four generations. At the end, countless bushels of tomatoes have been transformed into cases upon cases of glass jars of red heaven.

If you grow your own tomatoes, this is the perfect thing to make with them. Or you can go out east on Long Island and pick your own at these farms: http://bit.ly/18DTORQ

So how can tomatoes help your fertility?

Tomatoes are full of antioxidants and vitamin C and are very rich in Lycopene.

High oxidative stress/free radicals in the body can cause cell damage, including sperm damage, and has been recognized as one of the causes of male infertility. Environmental toxins can worsen oxidative stress. Antioxidants can help reduce oxidative stress.*

Lycopene is found in high concentrations in the testes and seminal plasma and is “a component of the human redox defense mechanism” against free radicals. Low lycopene intake may negatively affect semen quality and contribute to male factor infertility. **

A study from the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, published in the International Urology and Nephrology, found that lycopene supplementation may help male factor infertility. The results were impressive: 66% had improved sperm concentration, 53% had improved motility, and 46% showed improved morphology.  Further, 23% of the men in this study achieved fatherhood. **

If you have known or suspected male factor infertility, eating a diet high in lycopene-rich foods may help. Or ask your physician about lycopene supplementation. Never take any supplements without your doctor’s approval since unsupervised supplementation can be harmful.

This week, I am sharing a simple recipe to use up those red, ripe tomatoes. It’s full of lycopene, powerful antioxidants, and Vitamin C…all good fertility-friendly components! Add some bread dipped in a garlic-infused olive oil to add a healthy fat and help your body absorb the lycopene, and you are set!

It’s Garden Fresh Tomato Sauce, courtesy of Kelly over at Primally-Inspired. Get the recipe here (There’s a neat, easy printable copy of the simple recipe right at the bottom of the link!): http://bit.ly/13jhsPf

Once you make it, come back and tell me how great it was!

And if you can’t eat tomatoes, here’s a great “top 10” list of other foods rich in lycopene. http://bit.ly/1c9GR4G

*Disclaimer:Any recipe we offer is only meant for those who aren’t sensitive or allergic to the ingredients. Recipes are shared simply for fun only and nothing contained herein constitutes medical advice or a guarantee that eating any particular food will have any effect on your fertility. And remember NEVER to take any vitamin, mineral, dietary or other supplements unless advised to do so by your physician.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * **

Have any recipes high in lycopene that you’d like to share? If so, please share it here. And if you try this one, let us know what you thought.

 

 

* http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxidative_stress

** http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1024483520560#page-1

Tomato photo credit: adline ghani/ http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=1130&picture=tomatoes

 

 

 

 

 

no comments

World’s First IVF Baby is 35!

By Tracey Minella

July 25th, 2013 at 10:01 pm

 

image courtesy of pbs.org

Happy Birthday to you. Happy Birthday to you. Happy birthday, dear Louise Brown. Happy Birthday to you.

Many of you are too young to remember where you were 35 years ago today…when news of the birth of the World’s first “test tube” baby hit the stands. Maybe you were playing with Barbies, or maybe you weren’t even born yet. I remember it though.

I was a young teen just learning about reproduction, reading the newspaper in our brown, gold, orange and white classic 70’s kitchen. I remember hearing the sensational, seemingly sci-fi news and thinking it was cool. Dad was intrigued. Mom was mortified.

Little did I know then how important this day in history would be in my own life. And how IVF technology would be the answer to my own dream of becoming a mother some twenty years later.

For the past several years, I recognize Louise Brown’s birthday in some little way. It may be a blog post, or just a moment of reflection on how thankful I am for her mom’s courage way back then. I’ve even had a cupcake or raised a glass on her behalf. It’s my little way of honoring the woman whose birth led to the births of my own children decades later.

Here’s an IVF trivia question in honor of today:

Louise is not the first IVF baby to have her own baby, but Louise is related to the first IVF baby to have her own baby. What is the woman’s name and what is their relationship?

* * * * * * * ** * * **

If you could say anything to Louise Brown’s mother, what would you say?

no comments

Royal Baby Madness and Infertility

By Tracey Minella

July 23rd, 2013 at 3:08 pm

 

credit; Petr Kratovichl/publicdomainpictures.net

Can we get some perspective here?

There are two camps here. Those who love all things royal and have no pressing personal reasons that would quell their passion to devour every last detail about this historically-significant birth. They appreciate the birth for the miracle that it is, but go to the extreme in their obsession with every nauseating detail about the baby’s name and sex, the nursery décor, etc. I’m sure the shelves are already emptied of whatever brand car seat they just buckled Prince Cambridge into.

Then there is the other camp. Those who are understandably sort of depressed or jealous… either because of infertility or other reasons… and for whom each snippet of baby talk is like a dagger to the heart. Some may think this kid’s used up his 15 minutes of fame about 937 hours ago. And then there are others who simply, well, have a life. They can’t understand how people stay glued to the news for reports on the first nursing session, the first diaper change, the royal family photo shoot, etc.

On some level, I’m certain every one of us infertiles… of all people… appreciate the miracle of this birth and are happy for the couple and wish them well.

Yet we hurt. We want what has presumably come so easily to this couple. This couple who has it all. Maybe poor William and Kate have become an easy target for the infertile world’s understandable frustration? They are young, seemingly untouched by the stresses many infertile couples are under and, well…living the fairy tale life. Now complete with the last piece of the happy picture. But how hard must it have been on them to have an entire nation’s pressure and expectation of producing an heir on their shoulders? Isn’t the pressure from one’s in-laws more than enough for any couple to bear?

If you are in the first camp, you have tuned me out already and have no doubt moved on to the next article or news clip about the royal baby…or have run out to snag one of those car seats. If you are in the second camp, let’s look at three things that might make you feel better or at least may spark some interesting conversation.

First, there’s some consolation in the fact that you live across the pond. Imagine how hard this all has been…and will continue to be…on the infertile folks in Britain?

Second, do you think Kate purposely let that remark slip last spring about giving the well-wisher stranger’s teddy bear “to my dau— ” just to throw the world off and take the pressure of having a boy off herself? Genius, if she did, don’t you think?!

Finally, what do you think about the Queen allegedly saying she was not to be awakened with news of the baby’s birth if it happened overnight??!! Seriously?

Well, whatever camp you are in, your feelings are normal. Here’s hoping your own prince or princess arrives soon…and to as much or as little fanfare as your heart desires.

* * * * * * * * **

What is your take on the royal baby’s birth? Can’t get enough….or enough already?

photo credit: Petr Kratochovil and http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=24277&picture=british-flags

no comments

Dude Looks Like a Baby

By Tracey Minella

July 18th, 2013 at 4:49 pm

 

image courtesy of fotographic 1980/free digital photos.net

Music and IVF fertilization rates are in the news.

Whether you’re into Aerosmith or Beyonce, Rascal Flatts or Metallica, a new study found that playing music in the presence of eggs increased fertilization rates in patients undergoing in-vitro fertilization.

In the study, conducted at Barcelona’s Marques Institute fertility clinic, 1,000 eggs were “injected with sperm”. Half were then placed in incubators where various genres of music…including Nirvana, Madonna, Michael Jackson, Mozart and Bach… were playing on iPods. The other half of the eggs was not exposed to music. http://dailym.ai/17oCorm

 The fertilization rates were five (5%) higher in the eggs exposed to music.

Study leaders speculated that the vibrations from the iPods… not the music itself… was likely responsible for the difference in the fertilization rates.

According to the Daily Mail, Oxford Fertility expert, Dr. Dagan Wells, offers this theory: In natural fertilization, egg and sperm meet in the fallopian tube and, if fertilization occurs, the resulting embryo gently “rocks and rolls” its way down the tube and into the uterus where it hopefully implants and results in a pregnancy. But with in-vitro fertilization, the egg and sperm just sit largely stagnant in the culture media of the petri dish and “stew in its own juice.” Specifically, the addition of music may provide good vibrations for increased fertilization by helping nutrients pass into the egg and with speeding up the removal of toxic waste.

Study leaders also found that the style or type of music was not a clear factor… so anything from Sinatra to show tunes may suffice. However, there was some speculation that pounding, rhythmic “techno music” with bass may provide the most vibration.

Music is almost always playing in Long Island IVF’s O.R. and embryology lab.

What kind?  I’m told it usually ranges from soft pop to classical. Does that make our doctors and embryologists “rock stars” in their field? You can compare Long Island IVF’s success rate statistics to the national stats… and then to other local clinics…and decide for yourself: http://www.longislandivf.com/success_rates.cfm

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

Was there music playing during your retrieval or transfer? Do you remember the song?

If not, do you have a “lucky” song you play on the way to or from your procedure? (At the risk of dating myself, I used to listen to country legend Garth Brooks’ Two of a Kind (Working on a Full House). Y’all can hear a cover version of it right here http://youtu.be/9yaUeBI2AVA . Its funny lyrics really hit home back in the days when transferring four embryos was the protocol and high-order multiples was more common than it is today.

Photo credit: fotographic 1980 and http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=100138806

no comments

Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 22: Cryopreservation of Embryos

By David Kreiner, MD

July 15th, 2013 at 11:09 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Twenty-Two: Cryopreservation of Embryos. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=119

 Cryopreservation of Embryos

 In 1985, my mentors, Drs. Howard W. Jones Jr and his wife Georgeanna Seegar Jones, the two pioneers of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) in the Western Hemisphere, proposed the potential benefits of cryopreserving embryos for future transfers.  They predicted that doing so would increase the overall success rate of IVF and make the procedure safer, more efficient and cost effective. 

One fresh IVF cycle might yield enough embryos so that in addition to performing a fresh embryo transfer in the same cycle as the stimulation and retrieval that additional embryos may be preserved for use in future cycles.  This helps to limit the exposure to certain risks confronted in a fresh cycle such as the use of injectable stimulation hormones, the egg retrieval and general anesthesia.  It also allows patients to minimize their risk for a multiple pregnancy since embryos can be divided for multiple transfers.

At Long Island IVF, we are realizing the Jones’ dream of safer, more efficient and cost- effective IVF, as well as increasing the overall success of IVF. 

Today, an estimated 25% of all assisted reproductive technology babies worldwide are now born after freezing.  Studies performed in Sweden revealed that babies born after being frozen had at least as good obstetric outcome and malformation rates as with fresh IVF.  Slow freezing of embryos has been utilized for 25 years and data concerning infant outcome appear reassuring relative to fresh IVF. 

I personally have pushed to promote the concept of removing the financial pressure to put all your eggs in one basket by eliminating the cost of cryopreservation and storage for those patients transferring a single embryo.  Furthermore, such a patient may go through three frozen embryo transfers to conceive for the price of one at our program.  We truly believe we are practicing the most successful, safe and cost effective IVF utilizing cryopreservation.

* * * * * * **  * * * *

Was this helpful in answering your questions about cryopreservation of embryos?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

no comments

Fertile Food Friday– Red Meat

By Tracey Minella

July 12th, 2013 at 10:24 pm

 

recipe and photo courtesy of primally-inspired.com


Fertile Food Friday– Red Meat

Welcome back to Long Island IVF’s “Fertile Food Fridays”*! This is our third week of focusing on foods that can potentially boost male or female fertility. If you missed them, be sure to check out our first two featured foods…avocados and blueberries…covered the past two Fridays.

Next up to the plate…Red Meat.

Step outside at dinnertime most summer evenings and you can smell something good on the neighbor’s grill. And chances are it’s some kind of red meat.

Red meat is a great source of iron. Iron deficiency is common in women of bearing age and also can contribute to ovulatory infertility. In fact, a large study found that “women who consumed iron supplements had a significantly lower risk of ovulatory infertility than women who did not use iron supplements” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17077236 . More precisely, they had a 40% less risk of ovulatory infertility than those who did not use supplements. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/14/health/14fert.html

If you are trying to conceive, and suspect you may be iron deficient, ask your doctor to check your iron level. This is done with a simple CBC blood test to see if your red blood cell count is adequate. Red blood cells deliver oxygen to all the cells and tissues of your body, including your ovaries and uterus**. If your red blood cell count is too low, you may be anemic, and may be instructed to take iron supplements or make dietary changes. Never take any supplements without your doctor’s approval since too much iron can be harmful.

Symptoms of anemia** may include:

mild to severe fatigue
• chronic headaches
• dizziness
• brittle or weak nails
• decreased appetite
• low blood pressure

According to the Mayo Clinic, some iron-rich foods include red meat, leafy green vegetables like spinach, beans, eggs, dried fruit, and other items. In addition, eating foods rich in Vitamin C, like peppers, helps your body absorb iron. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/iron-deficiency-anemia/DS00323/DSECTION=prevention.

So this week’s recipe is a winner because it provides iron from steak and spinach, plus Vitamin C from the peppers to help you absorb the iron. Give yourself a break from those boring old burgers and try this amazing Stuffed Flank Steak, courtesy of Kelly over at Primally-Inspired. http://www.primallyinspired.com/stuffed-flank-steak/. <<<Get the recipe here. And while you are over there, check out Kelly’s other great recipes for those with a primal palette. Or here it is below:

STUFFED FLANK STEAK

4 or more servings

Ingredients:

1 ½ – 2 lb flank or skirt steak

2 – 4 T olive or coconut oil

4 – 6 oz mushrooms, sliced thin

1 shallot, diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

5 – 6 pieces prosciutto

2 roasted red peppers (from a jar or make your own), cut into thin strips

1 bunch of fresh spinach

1/3 cup blue cheese crumbles (omit if you cannot eat dairy)

salt and pepper, to taste

½ tsp smoked paprika

kitchen twine

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 350.

Starting with the long side of your flank steak, cut it in half carefully, but don’t cut all the way through to the other end (butterfly it). You want to cut it and open it like a book. Once it’s cut and open like a book, place a piece of plastic or parchment over it and pound it to uniform thickness – about ¼ of an inch thick.

In the largest skillet you have (must fit the rolled up steak), pour 1 – 2 T oil in the pan over medium low heat. Add your shallot, garlic, and mushrooms and cook for 5 minutes. Season them with salt and pepper.

Add the mushroom mixture to the flank steak, leaving 2 to 3 inches of open space on one of the long ends.

Add the red peppers on top of the mushrooms. Then add the prosciutto slices all over the red peppers. Then add your spinach all over the prosciutto. Next sprinkle the blue cheese all over the spinach.

Starting with the long end (not the end that you left 2-3 inches of space), roll up carefully.

Now tie kitchen twine around your roll about every 2 inches. Salt and pepper and sprinkle the smoked paprika all over the outside of the roll.

Pour 1- 2 T oil back in the skillet and turn the heat to medium high.

Sear your roll on all sides until browned – it takes about a minute each side.

Transfer your skillet to the oven and cook for 20 minutes (for medium).

After the 20 minutes is up, take it out and tent your steak with aluminum foil. Let rest for 10 minutes. For steak done more than medium: cook in the oven for 30 minutes, tent steak and let rest for 10 minutes.

To serve: cut off the twine and slice in ½ – 1 inch slices and enjoy!

 

Once you make it, come back and tell me how great it was!

*Disclaimer:Any recipe we offer is only meant for those who aren’t sensitive or allergic to the ingredients. Recipes are shared simply for fun only and nothing contained herein constitutes medical advice or a guarantee that eating any particular food will have any affect on your fertility.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * **

Do you know your iron level? Have any recipes high in iron-rich foods that you’d like to share? If so, please share it here. And if you try this one, let us know what you thought.

 

 

** http://natural-fertility-info.com/iron-fertility-anemia.html

Photo credit: Primally-inspired

no comments

Vitamin D and IVF Success Rates

By Tracey Minella

July 11th, 2013 at 9:18 pm

 

image courtesy of Victor Habbick/freedigital photos.net

What do sunscreen, shady trees, staying indoors, and a poor diet have in common? Collectively, they can sabotage your ability to conceive if they significantly deplete your level of Vitamin D.

A recent Canadian study of post-retrieval Vitamin D levels in women undergoing IVF found higher pregnancy rates and higher implantation rates among the women who had sufficient levels (>30 ng/ml) of Vitamin D, in comparison to those with insufficient levels. http://bit.ly/12v0uvL

Vitamin D can be obtained from eating a proper diet or from supplements. Foods rich in Vitamin D include fortified cereals and dairy products like milk, fish, eggs, and mushrooms to name a few. The recommended daily requirement of Vitamin D is 600 IUs, but you can get too much of a good thing, so be mindful that Vitamin D toxicity can occur when levels approach 10,000 IUs/day. http://bit.ly/13SfFWg

In addition to diet and supplements, Vitamin D is the “sunshine vitamin”. You may be able to get enough of it simply by spending sufficient time in the sun each day…without sunscreen. But you have to factor in the season, climate, and how long you are able to be in the sun without burning. For help figuring out how much exposure is best for your skin type, click here: http://bit.ly/13Ev0e1

Another great article to read about the specifics of Vitamin D and your reproductive health is this prior post by Dr. Kreiner: http://bit.ly/15zJgmn.

* * * * * * * * * * * * **

Do you spend any time out in the sun without sunscreen? Do you know your Vitamin D level?

 

Photo credit: Victor Habbick: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=10076698

 

 

 

 

 

no comments

NWW Photo Caption Contest No.79

By Tracey Minella

July 10th, 2013 at 10:29 pm

 

image courtesy of abusmentparknation and cakewrecks.com

Welcome back to Nearly Wordless Wednesday, our weekly photo caption contest*… or NWW as it’s known to the regulars. NWW is our blog-based contest where anyone anywhere can enter to win by submitting a clever caption for the photo of the week. Work in a few minutes in your week for our fun little stress-buster. It’s addicting. Come on and play.

Each week, the winner gets a gift card as our little thank you for playing our game.

This week’s contest winner will get a Starbucks gift card. Time to indulge yourself on our dime! To win the gift card, you’ve got to be the best caption. Why not grab some friends at the office and make a challenge amongst yourselves? One of you may win the prize and bragging rights while enjoying your favorite treat on us next week!

Before we move on to the contest, we need to announce last week’s contest winner: Maureen! Remember the picture of the leather-skinned woman and little boy on the beach? We liked Maureen’s  clever play on words best:

“I’m not sure if this is “Baking or Bacon?” But it’s GROSS!”

Maureen, please email your address and the words “NWW Contest #78 Starbucks” to Lindsay at lmontello@liivf.com to claim your gift card.

Now on to this week’s challenge…

Missing the Fourth of July fun from last weekend? Here’s a spirited cake to caption. The photo comes from the funny stock of abusementparknation.com and cakewrecks.com.

Give this photo a caption on the blog (remember it’s not a Facebook contest). Can’t wait to see what you come up with!

Best entry winner gets Starbucks on us! It’s a fast, fun and free contest open to anyone, whether infertile or not, and whether a patient of our practice or not. Join our “regulars” in the weekly challenge!

Bookmark our blog and check back next week to see if you won and we’ll mail you your gift card.

Plus, if you decide to “LIKE” us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/longislandivf , we may be able to send you the prize as an e-gift right through Facebook, depending on what this week’s prize is, so you could be enjoying your winnings as early as on the day we choose the winner! But we’re more than happy to mail it to you! (So as much as we’d love you to “LIKE” us on Facebook, it is absolutely not required to either enter or win our contests!)

*This is a blog-based contest. You may only enter it on the blog. This contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed, or administered by, or associated with Facebook.  All entrants or participants completely release Facebook for any claims. Participants are disclosing their entry information to LIIVF, not Facebook. “Liking” LIIVF on Facebook is not required to enter or win.

Enter today! Or at least before next Tuesday!

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Why not bookmark us so you remember to check back often…at least every Wednesday…so you don’t miss our NWW contests. And we also run bigger contests, too. Please feel free to suggest other fun places we could get gift cards from that you’d like to win as prizes for these fun contests or topics you’d like to see discussed on the blog. Now go enter the contest!

Photo credit:  http://abusementparknation.com/ and cakewrecks.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16 comments

Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 22: Cryopreservation of Embryos

By David Kreiner MD

July 8th, 2013 at 8:58 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Twenty-Two: Cryopreservation of Embryos. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=119

Cryopreservation of Embryos

In 1985, my mentors, Drs. Howard W. Jones Jr and his wife Georgeanna Seegar Jones, the two pioneers of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) in the Western Hemisphere, proposed the potential benefits of cryopreserving embryos for future transfers.  They predicted that doing so would increase the overall success rate of IVF and make the procedure safer, more efficient and cost effective. 

 

One fresh IVF cycle might yield enough embryos so that in addition to performing a fresh embryo transfer in the same cycle as the stimulation and retrieval that additional embryos may be preserved for use in future cycles.  This helps to limit the exposure to certain risks confronted in a fresh cycle such as the use of injectable stimulation hormones, the egg retrieval and general anesthesia.  It also allows patients to minimize their risk for a multiple pregnancy since embryos can be divided for multiple transfers.

 

At Long Island IVF, we are realizing the Jones’ dream of safer, more efficient and cost- effective IVF, as well as increasing the overall success of IVF. 

 

Today, an estimated 25% of all assisted reproductive technology babies worldwide are now born after freezing.  Studies performed in Sweden revealed that babies born after being frozen had at least as good obstetric outcome and malformation rates as with fresh IVF.  Slow freezing of embryos has been utilized for 25 years and data concerning infant outcome appear reassuring relative to fresh IVF. 

 

I personally have pushed to promote the concept of removing the financial pressure to put all your eggs in one basket by eliminating the cost of cryopreservation and storage for those patients transferring a single embryo.  Furthermore, such a patient may go through three frozen embryo transfers to conceive for the price of one at our program.  We truly believe we are practicing the most successful, safe and cost effective IVF utilizing cryopreservation.

 

* * * * * * **  * * * *

Was this helpful in answering your questions about cryopreservation of embryos?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions, whih Dr. Kreiner will answer.

no comments


The Fertility Daily Blog by Long Island IVF
© Copyright 2010-2012