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Archive for August, 2013

Summer Lovin’ Had Me a Blast(ocyst)

By Tracey Minella

August 31st, 2013 at 9:14 am

 

credit: imagerymajestic/freedigitalphotos.net

If you’re trying to conceive for a while now, it’s a safe bet you didn’t have the kind of summer nights that those kids from Grease had. 

But for so many people on Long Island, summer is the hardest season to say “good-bye” to. Long, lazy days at the beach and relaxing nights with smores by the fire pit are hard to let go. Yet the last weekend of summer is upon us. Did you have a blast this summer?

What does summer’s end mean to you and your infertility journey?

Maybe nothing.

Maybe summer is no different than all the other seasons that seem to run endlessly into each other as your infertility journey stretches longer than you ever thought it would. Time can be a blur like that. Maybe the ever-present pain of infertility ruined your summer and you didn’t relax much at all. Maybe being with people got on your nerves and you’re happy to see the exhaustive series of obligatory parties and barbeques finally come to an end. Maybe you relish the onset of cooler weather and the ease of its social hibernation.

The start of the school year is hard when you don’t have children, but the former students in us will always remember September as a time for a fresh start. If you can tap into that nostalgic feeling, you can use it to reexamine and recommit to your fertility plan.

Let’s review. If you took the summer off from treatment to relax, it may be exciting now to get back on track. If you plodded ahead through the summer without success, you may want to step back and reexamine or readjust your plan, or even take a short breather to recharge your spirit as a couple. Either way, September is a great time to start anew and reconnect with each other.

When trying to conceive, it’s important to keep setting goals and scheduling breaks as needed, so you move forward at a pace that works for you financially, emotionally, and physically. It can be hard to get back into the routine of morning monitoring. Sometimes it’s hard to shake the pessimism and find the strength to face another potentially negative pregnancy test. Because a negative test feels like you’ve been thrown from a horse. But you know what that means, right?

You gotta get back in those stirrups.

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Did you take the summer off from fertility treatments or did you forge ahead? Any advice for others trying to set goals?

Photo credit: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=10085958 imagerymajestic

 

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 29: Why the Wyden Bill Does Not Support Fertility Patients

By David Kreiner MD

August 28th, 2013 at 2:18 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Twenty-Nine: Why the Wyden Bill Does Not Support Fertility Patients. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=138

Why “The Wyden Bill” Does Not Support Infertility Patients

 

IVF results subjected to government audit were mandated to be reported with the passage of the “Wyden bill”.   The intent of the CDC and national reproductive society (SART) was to assist infertility patients by informing them of the relative success of all IVF programs in the country. 

 

Unfortunately, what sometimes creates the best statistical results is not always in the best interest of the mother, child, family and society.  Now that prospective parents are comparing pregnancy rates between programs there is a competitive pressure on these programs to reports the best possible rates.   Sounds good…unfortunately it doesn’t always work out that way for the following reasons.

 

Patients with diminished ovarian reserve, who are older or for any number of reasons have a reduced chance for success, have a hard time convincing some programs to let them go for a retrieval.  In 2008, we reported our success, 15% with patients who stimulated with three or fewer follicles.  Sounds low and in fact many of these patients were turned away by other IVF programs in our area.  However, for those families created as a result of their IVF, these “miracle” babies are a treasure that they otherwise… if not for our program giving them their chance… would never have been born.

 

Another unfortunate circumstance of featuring live birth rate per transfer as the gold standard for comparison is that it pressures programs to transfer multiple embryos thereby increasing the number of high risk multiple pregnancies created.  This is not just a burden placed on the patient for their own medical and social reasons but these multiple pregnancies add additional financial costs that are covered by society by increasing costs of health insurance as well as the cost of raising an increased number of handicapped children.

 

William Petok, the Chair of the American Fertility Association’s Education Committee reported on the alternative Single-Embryo Transfer (SET) “Single Embryo Transfer:  Why Not Put All of Your Eggs in One Basket?”.  He stated in November 2008, that although multiple rather than single-embryo transfer for IVF is less expensive in the short run, the risk of costly complications is much greater.  Universal adaptation of SET cost patients an extra $100 million to achieve the same pregnancy rates as multiple transfers, but this approach would save a total of $1 billion in healthcare costs.

 

We have offered SET since 2006 with the incentive of free cryopreservation, storage for a year and now a three for one deal for the frozen embryo transfers within the year in an effort to drive patients to the safer SET alternative. 

 

If we are going to report pregnancy rates with IVF as is required by the Wyden Bill, let us put all programs on the same playing field by enforcing the number of embryos to be transferred and even promoting minimal stimulation IVF for good prognosis patients.  The Wyden Bill without the teeth to regulate such things as the number of embryos transferred and reporting success per embryo transfer does more harm than good.  Let us promote safer alternatives and report in terms of live birth rate per stimulation and retrieval, including frozen embryo transfers, so that there is a better understanding of the success of a cycle without increasing risks and costs from multiples.

 

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about the Wyden Bill, IVF success rates and reporting requirements, and SET?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 28: No More “Jon and Kate” Casualties

By David Kreiner, MD

August 23rd, 2013 at 5:12 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Twenty-Eight: No More “Jon and Kate” Casualties. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=136

No More “Jon and Kate” Casualties

 

A few years ago when I wrote this chapter, the Jon and Kate makes eight story was still hot in the press.  It brought to the national limelight the potentially tragic risk of the high order multiple pregnancy for women undergoing fertility therapy.  It is one I was all too familiar with from my early days in the field, during the mid-1980′s when the success with IVF was poor and we consequently ran into occasional high order multiple pregnancies with transfer of four or more embryos or with the alternative gonadotropin injection treatment with intrauterine insemination (IUI).

 

Today, IVF is an efficient process that, combined with the ability to cryopreserve excess embryos, allows us to avoid almost all high order multiple pregnancies.  In fact the IVF triplet pregnancy rate for Long Island IVF docs has been under 1% for several years now.  There has not been a quadruplet pregnancy in over 20 years.  Such a claim cannot be made for gonadotropin injection/IUI therapy where as many eggs that ovulate may implant.

 

You may ask then why would we provide a service that is both less successful and more risky and was the reason Jon and Kate made eight.

 

Not surprisingly, the impetus for this unfortunate treatment choice is financial.  Insurance companies, looking to minimize their cost, refuse to cover fertility treatment unless they are forced to do so.  In New York State, there is a law that requires insurance companies based in NY State that cover companies with over 50 employees that is not an HMO to cover IUI.  The insurance companies battled in Albany to prevent a mandate to cover IVF as has been passed in New Jersey, Massachusetts and Illinois among a few others.  As a result, many patients are covered for IUI but not IVF.  This short-sighted policy ignores the costs that the insurance companies, and ultimately society, incurs as a result of high order multiple pregnancies, hospital and long-term care for the babies.

 

The answer is simple.  Encourage patients to practice safer, more effective fertility.  This can be accomplished with insurance coverage for IVF, wider use of minimal stimulation IVF especially the younger patients who have had great success with it and minimizing the number of embryos transferred. 

 

At Long Island IVF we encourage single embryo transfer by eliminating the cost of cryopreservation and embryo storage for one year for patients who transfer one fresh embryo.  In addition, we offer those patients up to three frozen embryo transfers for the price of one within a year of their retrieval or until they have a live birth.

 

It is my sincere wish that the government can step in to enforce a policy that will never again allow for the possibility of another Jon and Kate debacle.

 

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about multiple pregnancies, IVF, IUI, and Micro-IVF?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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Micro-IVF vs. Full Stimulation IVF Study Shows Similar Clinical Outcomes

By Dr. David Kreiner and Tracey Minella

August 21st, 2013 at 7:48 pm

 

photo credit: stockbyte/freedigitalphotos.net

Long Island IVF is excited to offer a glimpse into its fifteen (15) month study of clinical outcomes comparing minimal stimulation IVF (Micro-IVF) and traditional full stimulation IVF.

The two IVF options differ by their stimulation protocols, costs and risks. The fee for basic Micro-IVF is $3900 without anesthesia and not including the medication. In Micro-IVF, patients typically take 100 mg. of Clomid for 5 days, followed by 75 IU of gonadotropin injections for 2-4 days, depending on follicle size as monitored by ultrasound. In full stimulation IVF, patients typically take a GnRH antagonist with doses from 150-600 IU of gonadotropin daily for several days, depending on follicle size as monitored by ultrasound. The amount of medication used, and consequently the number of eggs retrieved, is much greater with the full stimulation IVF.  As a result, generally success rates would be higher with the more aggressive stimulation.

In a retrospective data analysis of patients (<35 years of age) undergoing IVF between October 2011 and December 2012, this study by the physicians and embryologists of Long Island IVF sought to evaluate the effects of minimal stimulation IVF (Micro-IVF) on clinical outcomes. This data was presented at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), held in Boston, Massachusetts on October 17, 2013.

Average Number of Oocytes (Eggs)

Average Number of Embryos Transferred

Fetal Hearts per Embryo Transfer/ (Implantation Rate)

Clinical Pregnancy Rate per Embryo Transfer

Micro-IVF

3.5

1.7

28%

13/28=46%

Full Stim IVF

14.5

1.8

38%

117/215=54%

 

 

In the Micro-IVF cycles, the average number of oocytes (eggs) retrieved was far less than for the full stimulation IVF cycles and therefore there were far fewer embryos to select from for transfer.  As a result, there were most likely fewer high quality pregnancy potential embryos transferred from the Micro-IVF cycles and consequently that implanted (implantation rate).  This did not result in a considerably lower clinical pregnancy rate but there were far fewer twins relative to the group undergoing full stimulation IVF.

Aside from the lower cost, Micro-IVF offers a significantly lower incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome albeit for most without the advantage of additional cryopreserved embryos.   Even so, with a clinical pregnancy rate of 46% per embryo transfer, the study confirmed that Micro-IVF is often appropriate for younger patients. It can achieve a similar pregnancy rate using fresh embryos, is more cost-effective, and can reduce the risk of hyperstimulation.

 

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Do the results of this study make you more likely to consider Micro-IVF?

If you are interested in Micro-IVF, is it primarily because of the pregnancy rate, the lower risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, less medication, lower cost, or another reason?

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Granny’s Got Game: When Love Brings a Uterus Out of Retirement

By Tracey Minella

August 18th, 2013 at 10:59 pm

 

image courtesy of david castillo dominici/free digital photos.net


Mothers are the most special people on the planet. In fact, they are angels on earth. So are grandmothers. Their devotion to their children’s safety and happiness is mind-blowing. They will stop at nothing when it comes to their children.

That’s why most of us are driven to be mothers ourselves. We’ve likely watched our own moms take care of us and their example feeds our own maternal longing.

So what happens when a woman who desperately wants a baby that’s biologically hers meets a brick wall on her infertility path? A wall with hurtful graffiti that says “Not Gonna Happen in Your Uterus”.

What happens when she relays this news as she sobs in her own mother’s arms?

Sometimes… her mom steps up to the stirrups.

Fueled by the powerful combination of two complementary forces…her child’s happiness and her own desire for grandchildren…and assisted by in vitro fertilization (“IVF”) technology, moms sometimes become gestational carriers for their children.

That means that embryos created through IVF from the eggs and sperm of the grown child and their spouse are transferred instead into the uterus of the grown child’s mother, in the hope that implantation will occur and a healthy pregnancy and baby will result. It is a grandmother giving birth to her grandchild.

Think about it.

Advances in reproductive medicine have made it possible for an older woman to deliver a baby grandchild from the same uterus that hosted one of its parents decades earlier.

This blog was inspired by the news this week of a 53-year-old woman who, wanting to help her daughter and son-in-law build their family, carried and gave birth to her own twin grandchildren. And this is after she already gave birth to another grandchild for them a couple of years earlier. Now that’s a mother’s love.*

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If you were unable to carry a baby for medical reasons, would you ask your mom to carry for you? Would you ask another family member? Would you seek out a stranger? Or would you do something else entirely?

* Source:http://www.scienceworldreport.com/articles/8847/20130815/53-year-old-gives-birth-daughters-twin-babies.htm

Photo credit: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php David Castillo Dominici

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Discrimination in Infertility

By Tracey Minella

August 16th, 2013 at 10:03 pm

 

image courtesy of stock images/free digital photos.net


Everyone understands that it’s “us against them” in the infertile vs. fertile world. Most people don’t even blame us when the ache of our empty arms fuels intense depression and jealously towards the fertile folks and causes many of us to avoid baby showers.

Especially since we’d make better parents. Did I just say that out loud?

I’m only joking, of course. But we infertiles do think that sometimes. When you suffer and win the battle against infertility you are rarely accused of taking parenthood for granted. We see parenthood as the privilege and gift it really is. Every minute of every day. Even as we are yelling, there is an awareness of gratitude for finally having been blessed with a child to reprimand.

But while there is a “sisterhood of the traveling stirrups” that unites infertile women, there is an ugly, divisive secret among the sorority: We’re prone to cliques and passing judgment upon each other.

For example, the IVF “veterans”…those who have been cycling awhile without success… aren’t always welcoming to the “newbies” who haven’t “paid their dues” yet. Older patients may look at younger ones with an envy not far removed from what they direct at fertile folks. And heaven help the secondary infertility patient who brings a baby into the clinic’s waiting room.

In addition to occasional hostility from within our ranks, society often has shameful and misinformed opinions about infertile folks.

People unfairly judge older women who seek fertility treatment, often assuming they waited too long to start trying to conceive while advancing career goals. They feel less sympathy toward same sex couples, wrongly judging their lifestyle. They look at obese women with contempt assuming their weight problem is something within their control. They feel little sympathy toward women suffering from secondary infertility figuring they should just be happy with the child(ren) they already have.

It’s like they feel we got what we deserved.

Do you think society’s general discrimination factors…like age, sexual orientation, and weight… play a role in how sympathetic people are towards infertile women?

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Have YOU seen any examples of this kind of behavior in your own journey…from fertile folks, doctors, or other infertile patients?

 

Photo credit: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=10080761 stock images

 

 

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 27: A Dozen Embryos, Who Will Stop This Madness?

By David Kreiner MD

August 12th, 2013 at 9:44 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Twenty-Seven: A Dozen Embryos, Who Will Stop This Madness? You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=133

A Dozen Embryos, Who Will Stop This Madness?

When I wrote this chapter, the news of the day was that an IVF clinic had transferred 12 embryos.  In fact, it was learned weeks later that this was a hoax.  However, in the wake of Octomom, where 8 embryos were transferred, I felt there was still an important lesson to be learned especially since insurance companies often insist that a patient try multiple cycles of intrauterine insemination (IUI) before covering IVF… if they cover it at all. 

 

In fact, gonadotropin hormones in conjunction with IUI offers a 35% risk of multiple pregnancy including a 5% risk of triplets or more.  After obtaining six fetuses after one such cycle, I became very wary of offering gonadotropin IUI cycles to my patients.

 

Yet, this is what our insurance companies are covering rather than the safer IVF where only 1 or 2 embryos can be transferred at a time.

 

When we do an IUI, as many eggs that ovulate can implant resulting in a high risk multiple pregnancy.  I believe that it is not until we discourage the use of gonadotropins without IVF by offering a regulated covered alternative will we eliminate these risky multiples.

 

Until then, all of us including society, the government, insurance companies and employers are to blame for letting these dangerous multiple pregnancies occur.

 

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about multiple pregnancy risks in IUIs and IVF?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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Fertile Food Series – Shellfish

By Tracey Minella

August 9th, 2013 at 10:36 pm

 

photo courtesy of Danielle Walker/Against All Grain


Welcome back to Long Island IVF’s “Fertile Food Summer Series”*! This is our sixth week of focusing on foods that can potentially boost male or female fertility. If you missed them, be sure to check out our earlier featured foods…including avocados, blueberries, red meat, tomatoes, and chocolate…covered the past few weeks.

This week we’re focusing on Iodine. Many people think of salt when they think of iodine in our diets, but we can get iodine from shellfish (like shrimp), seaweed, kelp, and fruits and vegetables (some of which grow near the sea, like coconuts). Spinach, eggs, and raw dairy products are also good sources of iodine.

So how can iodine help your fertility?

According to Natural Fertility and Wellness, iodine is a trace element responsible for healthy thyroid function. And without sufficient iodine, the thyroid, adrenals and entire endocrine system can be affected, including the body’s ability to create sex hormones.  Higher rates of miscarriage and stillbirth may be linked to iodine deficiency.**

How do you know if you have iodine deficiency?

According to IodineSupplement.org., symptoms of iodine deficiency*** may include:

  • Low Body Temperature/Increased sensitivity to cold
  • Dry Skin/Brittle Nails
  • Fatigue/Weakness
  • Weight Gain
  • Depression
  • Constipation
  • Dry, yellowed, puffy skin, particularly on the face
  • Goiter, or swelling of the lower neck

 

The most accurate way to test your iodine level is through a blood test. Some sites, including Iodine Supplement.org., suggest you rub a 2” circle of tincture of iodine on your upper inner arm and observe how long it takes to disappear. If it’s gone in under an hour, you may be iodine deficient. If it’s still there after four hours, you may not be deficient. Again, only a lab test will tell for sure. Never take any supplements without your doctor’s approval since unsupervised supplementation and excess iodine levels can be harmful.

This week, I am so happy to share an exciting recipe for Mixed Seafood Paella from one of the hottest new cookbook authors, Danielle Walker. She just kicked off a national book tour for her cookbook “Against All Grain”† and she has graciously agreed to share her paella recipe and stunning food photography here. This paella includes three kinds of high iodine seafood: shrimp, clams, and mussels. You can see beautiful photos beside the simple steps to create this meal right here†: http://bit.ly/1ez4DW9   and you can also print out the recipe easily. If you search her Against All Grain blog for “shrimp”, you will find other tasty, fertility-friendly recipes, including high-iodine ingredients like spinach and coconut. She posts recipes on her Facebook page, toohttp://on.fb.me/13NpiEJ

If you make it, let us know what you thought!

*Disclaimer:Any recipe we offer is only meant for those who aren’t sensitive or allergic to the ingredients. Recipes are shared simply for fun only and nothing contained herein constitutes medical advice or a guarantee that eating any particular food will have any effect on your fertility. And remember NEVER to take any vitamin, mineral, dietary or other supplements unless advised to do so by your physician.

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Have a recipe high in iodine? If so, please share it here. And if you try this one, let us know what you thought.

** http://bit.ly/15Wmu7E

***  http://bit.ly/19TBTKg

†Photo credit and recipe credit: Danielle Walker: Against All Grain http://bit.ly/1ez4DW9 or facebook https://www.facebook.com/AgainstAllGrain

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 24: I Look Pretty Good in Scrubs

By David Kreiner MD

August 5th, 2013 at 1:51 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Twenty-Four: I Look Pretty Good in Scrubs. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=126

I Look Pretty Good in Scrubs

It is easy for an IVF partner, male or female to feel left out of the process.  After all, the IVF patient is the focus of all of the attention of the physicians and nurses, from the initial consultation and exam to the testing, ordering of medications, monitoring, etc.  

 

I have seen partners, who busy with their own jobs, appear to neglect their loved one who is going through IVF.  Unfortunately, partners are much needed for their support during this critical and stressful time. In some of the worst examples, I have seen relationships suffer as the IVF patient undergoes the entire process alone building resentment that can be difficult to overcome.

 

I have also seen partners get involved by accompanying the patient for her office visits and procedures.  Many partners pride themselves with their new found skill in mixing hormonal medications and administering injections for their partners.  It helps those especially who are used to caring for their partners to be in control by administering the medication for them.  Whether it is the feeling of “playing doctor” or the knowledge that they are contributing significantly to the process, most people relate to me that giving their partners the injections was a positive experience for them and their relationship.

 

The feeling can be euphoric when partners accompany the IVF patient to the embryo transfer.  Many women feel that at this moment… when the embryo is transferred into their womb… that they are pregnant.  Life may be starting here and it is a wonderful opportunity to share with your partner. 

 

I strongly recommend that you don those scrubs, hat and booties and join your partner as the physician transfers your embryo/s loaded from the laboratory dish by the embryologist. Watch on the ultrasound screen as he carefully releases the drop containing your embryo/s into her womb.  Inside that drop may be your baby in nine months.

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about the partner’s role in IVF? Do you have an experience you’d like to share about going through IVF as a couple?

 Was your partner involved? How? Did it bring you closer?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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Fertile Food Summer Series – Dark Chocolate…and Oysters

By Tracey Minella

August 2nd, 2013 at 11:44 pm

image courtesy of idea go/freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

 

Welcome back to Long Island IVF’s “Fertile Food Friday Summer Series”*! This is our fifth week of focusing on foods that can potentially boost male or female fertility. If you missed them, be sure to check out our earlier featured foods…including avocados, blueberries, red meat, and tomatoes…covered the past few Fridays.

This week we’re focusing on Zinc. Many people know Oysters are loaded with zinc…but many people gag at the thought of slurping down raw oysters (including me!) So, we can get our zinc from other foods, including  Dark Chocolate!

So how can zinc help your fertility?

Zinc is a mineral and also a known aphrodisiac. And what infertile couple …faced with libido-wilting intrusions like temperature charts and fertility shots…couldn’t use a little help now and then getting in the mood? Zinc is critical for both female and male fertility.

According to Natural Fertility Info, not only can an insufficient zinc level contribute to early miscarriage, but it can deplete follicular fluid levels and thereby impede the egg’s ability travel to and implant into the uterus. Zinc has a crucial role in the production of mature eggs capable of being fertilized and in the hormonal regulation of a woman’s menstrual cycle. Like a woman’s eggs, a man’s sperm relies on a sufficient supply of zinc in order to produce a strong tail and mature to a stage capable of journeying to and fertilizing an egg. Even if fertilization does occur, low levels of zinc in men can be responsible for chromosomal defects that contribute to early miscarriage. *

If you have known or suspected male factor infertility, have fibroids, have had a miscarriage, or have hormonal regulatory issues, eating a diet rich in zinc-rich foods may help. Or ask your physician about zinc supplementation. Zinc and copper levels are related and your doctor can help you regulate both. Never take any supplements without your doctor’s approval since unsupervised supplementation can be harmful.

photo credit: primallyinspired.com

This week, I am sharing a simple recipe for Homemade Dark Chocolate that is healthy and versatile! You can dip or cover Vitamin C-rich fruits in it, pour it over calcium-rich ice cream, or even layer it in candy molds with some peanut butter (another high-zinc food) for some decadent, fun peanut butter cups. The recipe is from Kelly over at PrimallyInspired. Get the recipe here: http://bit.ly/17Zh6AR

Oy! I almost forgot the Oysters. If you’d like to know how to prepare them on the grill with a quick little mango salsa, check out this great Food Network You Tube video of expert chef Bobby Flay. It’s under a minute long. http://youtu.be/UpWQOT2qMO0

If you make either recipe, come back and tell me how it was!

And if you can’t eat oysters or chocolate, here’s a great “top 10” list of other foods rich in zinc. http://bit.ly/1bV26cT

image courtesy of Tina Phillips/freedigitlaphotos.net

 

*Disclaimer:Any recipe we offer is only meant for those who aren’t sensitive or allergic to the ingredients. Recipes are shared simply for fun only and nothing contained herein constitutes medical advice or a guarantee that eating any particular food will have any effect on your fertility. And remember NEVER to take any vitamin, mineral, dietary or other supplements unless advised to do so by your physician.

 

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Have a recipe high in zinc? If so, please share it here. And if you try these, let us know what you thought.

 * http://bit.ly/13JK57u

 

Chocolate splash photo credit: Idea go/ http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=10012400

Oyster photo credit: Tina Phillips/  http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=10019608

Homemade Chocolate photo credit: Kelly/ http://www.primallyinspired.com/easy-healthy-homemade-dark-chocolate/

 

 

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