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Archive for the ‘BOLI 2015’ Category

“Synthetic Babies”: The Shot Heard Round the World

By Tracey Minella

March 16th, 2015 at 10:50 pm

 

Credit: Iamnee/freedigitalphotos.net


Can’t we all just get along?

Boycott is the word of the week in the IVF world. In the GLBT world. And the fashion world as well.

Popular gay fashion designers, Dolce and Gabbana (D&G) crossed the line this week with some insensitive comments about GLBT parenting, claiming that children should only be born to a mother and a father.

The comments were apparently made by the designers known for pushing the “traditional family model” (one mom and one dad) as a focus in their fashion campaign. One of the pair reportedly used terms like “children of chemicals”, “synthetic children”, “uterus for rent” and “sperm from catalogs” in slamming the children produced through IVF for the GLBT community.

Leading the boycott charge is pop icon Elton John, who along with his husband David Furnish, are parents of two IVF babies. John responded on Instagram:  “How dare you refer to my beautiful children as ‘synthetic’… And shame on you for wagging your judgemental little fingers at IVF – a miracle that has allowed legions of loving people, both straight and gay, to fulfill their dream of having children.” Then: #BoycottDolce&Gabbana.

Other celebrities, many of whom are gay or lesbian parents who used IVF and/or surrogacy to create their families, quickly jumped on the bandwagon to boycott the designers. Of course, fertility practices and infertility organizations weren’t far behind in expressing their dismay and outrage. The social media world exploded with #BoycottDolce&Gabbana hashtag, and claims that the designers’ mindset was as archaic as their designs. Ouch. People of privilege promised never to buy D&G again.

But what does this mean for the average infertile person who never even heard of D&G before… much less bought their pricey designs or fragrances? Budget-conscious folks, gay or straight, just trying to afford their fertility treatments.

Not much from a practical standpoint.

But let’s look at the silver lining of this storm cloud.

Although it has come a long way over the decades and is widely accepted, IVF has always been… and will always be…criticized by those who feel it is against their religion. Personhood amendments are a threat, but we’re still winning that long, familiar battle. At the risk of being overdramatic, IVF knew who its enemy was. And it was never the GLBT community.

Then D&G happened. To have two openly gay men bash the science that is responsible for giving the GLBT community the ability to become biological parents was just so… unexpected. It caught the breath in our throats. It not only offended heterosexuals, but it outraged the GLBT community. No doubt it felt like a betrayal. And with that handful of insensitive and hurtful remarks, the old sci-fi stigma of “test tube babies” came flooding back to the forefront.

Momentarily.

Until it was promptly and forcefully beaten with a stick into the ground with a vengeance.

The swift and deafening response to the attack on gay parenting via IVF was positively electric! The passionate defense of this science and the countless children it’s responsible for creating was beyond heartening. And the collective protective instincts of the many gays and straights who stepped up against this latest enemy of medically-assisted family-building for all came through with all the ferocity of a pride of lions guarding its cubs.

For better or worse, society places great weight on the opinions of celebrities. So while no one will lose sleep over whether or not the boycott bankrupts D&G, this incident has actually helped IVF. Sad and disgusting as it was, the incident has increased public awareness of infertility and incited a “call to arms”, particularly among the GLBT and celebrity communities, in support of the rights of all people to become parents and in support of the science of IVF. And IVF needs all the support it can get.

Stand united against any threat to the science of IVF and its accessibility to all.

#BoycottD&G today.

Boycott the next threat tomorrow.

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Do you boycott companies that threaten your religious, moral, or political beliefs? What do you think about the D&G scandal?

Do you have D&G items you no longer want? Parents Via Egg Donation had a good suggestion: Rather than throwing D&G items in the trash, consider selling them and donating the proceeds to charity or a fertility-friendly organization.

 

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Can Sunshine Boost Your Fertility?

By David Kreiner MD

March 4th, 2015 at 7:29 am

 

photo courtesy of stock images/freedigitalphotos.net


Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin that is present in a variety of forms but has recently been recognized as playing a critical role in reproduction.  It is essential in the production of sex hormones in the body.  It is thought that a deficiency of Vitamin D may lead among other things to ovulation disorders.

It has been demonstrated that Vitamin D deficient rats had a 75% reduced fertility and a 50% smaller litter size that was corrected with Vitamin D treatment.  In addition, sperm motility in males was reduced in the presence of a Vitamin D deficiency.

A study at the Yale University School of Medicine revealed that only 7% of 67 infertile women studied had normal Vitamin D levels and not a single woman with an ovulatory disorder had normal levels.  Nearly 40% of women with ovulatory dysfunction had a clinical deficiency of Vitamin D.

At a past conference of American Society of Reproductive Medicine, a study presented by Dr. Briana Rudick from USC showed that a deficiency of Vitamin D can also have a detrimental effect on pregnancy rates after IVF, possibly through an effect on the endometrial lining of the uterus.

In her study only 42% of the infertile women going through IVF had normal Vitamin D levels.  Vitamin D levels did not impact the number of ampules of gonadotropin utilized nor the number of eggs stimulated, embryos created or embryo quality.  However, Vitamin D levels did significantly affect pregnancy rates even when controlled for number of embryos transferred and embryo quality.  In this study the pregnancy rate dropped from 51% in Caucasian women undergoing IVF who had normal Vitamin D levels to 44% in those with insufficient levels and 19% in those that were deficient.

Vitamin D deficiency has also been associated with poor pregnancy outcomes including preeclampsia and gestational diabetes

Vitamin D can be obtained for free by sitting out in the sun and getting sun exposure on the arms and legs for 15-20 minutes per day during peak sunlight hours.  The sunlight helps the skin to create Vitamin D3 that is then transformed into the active form of Vitamin D by the kidneys and liver.   An oral supplement is available also in the form of Vitamin D3, with a minimum recommended amount of 1000 IU a day for women planning on becoming pregnant.  For those with clinical insufficiencies a higher dose may be administered by injection.

Our study and many others suggest that the effect is endometrial, but we don’t know for sure.

 

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Does this information cause you to reconsider how much time you’ll spend in the sun this spring and summer and how you’ll use sunscreen or other sun protection?

 

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Additional Extended Evening Office Hours at Long Island IVF

By Tracey Minella

February 23rd, 2015 at 11:23 am

 

Did you know that Long Island IVF offered evening office hours? Well not only have we offered extended hours in all of our offices for ages, we’ve added even more!

 

Infertility treatment can be stressful. And while some appointments and blood tests simply need to be done in the early morning hours, there are times when an evening appointment is feasible and might be more convenient. Especially for those who work full-time or who might be taking off certain mornings for less flexible monitoring appointments.

 

We’re pleased to announce that in an effort to be even more accessible to her patients, Dr. Satu Kuokkanen will be available on Wednesday evenings in the Lake Success office, starting in March.

 

The hours, nights, and doctors covering these evening appointments vary for each office so check with your doctor or LIIVF office for the specifics. Or if you are a new patient, contact the office you’re interested in for more information.

 

 

 

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Is the availability of evening doctor appointments an important factor in your decision to choose a reproductive endocrinologist?

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The IVF Transfer

By Tracey Minella

February 7th, 2015 at 9:24 am

 

photo credit: marin/freedigital photos.net


In vitro fertilization (IVF) is a long process. The transfer is at the end of the line.

When people do IVF, they endure weeks of daily hormone injections and blood work and ultrasounds designed to make the woman produce more than the one egg she would otherwise likely produce. When the time is right, an injection is given that leads to the final maturation of the eggs and the egg retrieval is scheduled for about 34 hours thereafter, so that the eggs will not be ovulated and the cycle lost.

Once the eggs are retrieved, they are placed in a petri dish with the partner’s sperm, and in some cases, Intra-Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) is performed. With ICSI, a single sperm is isolated and injected into a single egg to increase the odds of fertilization, usually in cases where sperm count or quality is an issue. Then, you wait a day for a fertilization report.

If there is fertilization, the resulting embryos are continually monitored and graded based on how they grow and develop. An agreed upon number of Day 3 embryos (or Day 5 blastocysts) get transferred back to the woman’s uterus via catheter. Each embryo or blastocyst has the potential to develop into a baby, or in rare cases, may even split into twins. Excess embryos are usually cryopreserved (frozen) for future use.

In order to make it to Transfer Day, a couple must survive all the prior phases: cycle suppression, ovarian/follicle stimulation with blood work that corresponds to the number and size of the follicles, a uterine lining that is thick enough for embryo implantation, retrieval of quality eggs, fertilization of eggs, development and growth of quality-grade embryos. Then, the transfer.

Optimists may relax more as each hurdle is cleared. Worry-warts hold their breath ‘til the end. And even then, they beg to lay there for the next two weeks with their hips elevated by pillows or they slam their partners’ driving with every bump on the ride home.

The transfer is a magical moment. It’s not only the end of the treatment cycle, but for many it’s the closest they may ever have been to getting pregnant.

The beauty of IVF comes in the knowledge that you did create embryos…they are real and you can literally see them. If you get pregnant you have breathtakingly beautiful photos of your child from the earliest moments of conception. You know the exact date of conception. You even see the glow of the embryos in the uterus after transfer.

There is nothing quite like the feeling of hope on transfer day. You can bask in the literal moment you may be becoming a mom. Visualize implantation happening. Will it to happen. Allow yourself to believe it because you never know what the effect of positive thinking could be.

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What was your transfer day like? What do you most remember about it?

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5 IVF Retrieval Blizzard Preparedness Tips

By Tracey Minella

January 26th, 2015 at 3:58 pm

credit: PeterGriffin/public domain photos.net

So, you went through all the blood work, sonograms, and injections for your IVF cycle and you wake up on the morning of your retrieval…if you even got any sleep the night before… ready for the big day.

 

Only problem is that blinding white glare streaming into the room.

 

“What the #@*%!” A snow storm hit overnight. Three feet down already and still falling fast. It’s gonna take all morning to dig out the car. Hey, where is the car?

 

Then your blood runs cold as you remember the biggest rule of all: “Don’t be late for your retrieval!”

 

Timing of the HcG shot and the subsequent retrieval is critical, so that the eggs are retrieved before they are ovulated. Then the next worry hits: “Even if I get there, will my doctors make it in?”

 

Fortunately, today’s meteorologists generally predict major storms enough in advance for patients and doctors to put contingency plans into place. Retrieval and transfer patients may be given special instructions and suggestions when a blizzard is expected.

 

If you anticipate a winter retrieval, in addition to allowing lots of extra time and filling the gas tank up, consider these 5 IVF Retrieval Blizzard Preparedness Tips:

 

  1. If there’s talk of snow, line up driveway plowing or shoveling extra early, or park the car down near the end of the driveway (but not in the street) so there’ll be less to shovel to get out. (Note: Ladies with swollen ovaries full of follicles should not shovel.)

 

  1. Call your town offices the day before, explain your medical situation, and beg them to have your road plowed early and often, if possible.

 

  1. If you don’t have one, line up borrowing an SUV or have a friend with an SUV drive you to the retrieval.

 

  1. Know the names of hotels near your clinic or hospital and consider staying in a hotel the night before retrieval if you live far away.

 

  1. Last resort: Call your local police department or fire department for help. Explain the situation and your need to get to the hospital or clinic immediately.

 

 

If despite the best planning, you’re running late on retrieval day, call your doctor’s office or service and tell them what’s going on and follow whatever instructions they give you.

There’s usually a small time window built into the schedule to accommodate for such an emergency, so don’t panic until you talk to them.

 

Because a retrieval can’t be postponed once the HcG shot has been given…even for a blizzard of potentially historic proportions… arrangements are made for Long Island IVF’s team of doctors, nurses and embryologists to stay local and to have reliable transportation so you can rest assured they will be there for your big day.

 

Remain positive and calm. And when it’s all over, you’ll have an interesting story to tell or excerpt to write in your fertility journal.

 

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Did you ever have a retrieval or transfer in a blizzard? How did it go and do you have any other tips to add?

 

Credit: Peter Griffin/http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=4893&picture=snowed-in&large=1

 

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The Man’s Role in IVF

By David Kreiner MD

January 24th, 2015 at 8:13 am

 

credit: imagery majestic/ freedigitalphotos.net


Many husbands complain that they feel left out of the whole IVF process as all the attention and care is apparently directed towards the woman. If anything they may feel that at best they can show up for the retrieval at which time they are expected to donate their sperm on demand. If you should fail at this then all the money, time, hope and efforts were wasted all because you choked when you could not even perform this one “simple” step.

I have not witnessed the terror and horrors of war but I have seen the devastation resulting from an IVF cycle failed as a result of a husband’s inability to collect a specimen. Relationships often do not survive in the wake of such a disappointment. Talk about performing under pressure, there is more at stake in the collection room than pitching in the World Series.

Husbands and male partners view IVF from a different perspective than their wives. They are not the ones being injected with hormones; commuting to the physician’s office frequently over a two week span for blood tests and vaginal ultrasounds and undergoing a transvaginal needle aspiration procedure. At least women are involved in the entire process, speak with and see the IVF staff regularly and understand what they are doing and are deeply invested emotionally and physically in this experience. So what is a husband to do?

 

Get Involved

Those couples that appear to deal best with the stress of IVF are ones that do it together.

Many husbands learn to give their wives the injections. It helps involve them in the efforts and give them some degree of control over the process. They can relate better to what their wives are doing and take pride that they are contributing towards the common goal of achieving the baby.

When possible, husbands should accompany their wives to the doctor visits. They can interact with the staff, get questions answered and obtain a better understanding of what is going on. This not only makes women feel like their husbands are supportive but is helpful in getting accurate information and directions. Both of these things are so important that in a husband’s absence I would recommend that a surrogate such as a friend, sister, or mother be there if he cannot be. Support from him and others help diminish the level of stress and especially if it comes from the husband helps to solidify their relationship.

Husbands should accompany their wives to the embryo transfer. This can be a highly emotional procedure. Your embryo/s is being placed in the womb and at least in that moment many women feel as if they are pregnant. Life may be starting here and it is wonderful for a husband to share this moment with his wife. Perhaps he may keep the Petri dish as a keepsake as the “baby’s first crib”.  It is an experience a couple is not likely to forget as their first time together as a family.

With regards to the pressure of performing to provide the specimen at the time of the retrieval, I would recommend that a husband freeze a specimen collected on a previous day when he does not have the intense pressure of having to produce at that moment or else. Having the insurance of a back-up frozen specimen takes much of the pressure off at the time of retrieval making it that much easier to produce a fresh specimen. There are strategies that can be planned for special circumstances including arranging for assistance from your wife and using collection condoms so that the specimen can be collected during intercourse. Depending on the program these alternatives may be available.

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If you did IVF, was your partner involved? How did it go? Any funny or sweet stories to share?

If your partner wasn’t involved, are you happy about that decision, and if so, why was it the right decision for you?

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Long Island IVF WINS “Best In Vitro Fertility Practice” in Best of Long Island 2015!

By admin

January 20th, 2015 at 2:28 pm

 

It is with humble yet excited hearts that we announce that Long Island IVF was voted the Best In Vitro Fertility Practice in the Best Of Long Island 2015 contest. Unlike prior years, for the 10th anniversary of the BOLI contest, there could only be one winner per category with no runners-up.

We just received word that we won. Thanks to all of you!

The doctors, nurses, embryologists, and the rest of the Long Island IVF staff are so proud of this honor and so thankful to each and every one of you who took the time to cast a vote in our favor. From the moms juggling LIIVF toddlers… to the dads coaching LIIVF teens…to the parents sending LIIVF adults off to college or down the aisles… to the LIIVF patients still on their journeys to parenthood who are confident in the care they’re receiving…we thank you all.

We love what we get to do every day…build families. And that’s all the thanks we really need. But your endorsement of us to your friends, families, and the public (by voting for us) means so much and will enable us to help even more infertile couples fulfill their dreams of building a family.

As we usher in 2015…our 27th year…we will continue to offer our unique blend of cutting-edge medical technologies and holistic, personal support… wrapped in the comfort of a private, non-hospital setting.

Thanks again. Happy New Year to all.

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4 Ways to De-Grinch An Infertile Heart This Holiday Season

By Tracey Minella

December 5th, 2014 at 11:19 pm

 

 

credit: wpclipart.com


Hot on the heels of Black Friday and Cyber Monday was #GivingTuesday…a day to give back. We shared a list of some worthy infertility-related not-for-profits for anyone’s consideration.

But why should giving only be reserved for only one day? Especially since giving can be so therapeutic.

Holidays that involve having children are understandably particularly hard on us infertile folk. And there’s no way to really fill that void, but here are a few suggestions to help get through this month while you’re waiting for your own “dream present”:

Toys for Tots: Most communities have Toys for Tots campaigns and are in seeking unwrapped, new toys for underprivileged children. Some of these children do not have parents and the holidays are particularly hard for them, too. You can donate a toy at your local Toys R Us but if braving the toy store is too hard, you can donate money instead. For more information and for a list of other drop-off locations and volunteer opportunities see: http://www.toysfortots.org/donate/toys.aspx

Adopt-a-Family: Many local hospitals and houses of worship have programs where people can adopt-a-family for the holidays. The families chosen have fallen on hard times due to unemployment, military deployment, serious illnesses, death, homelessness, or other hardships. If not for this program, the children may not have food, warm clothes, or any presents for the holidays. Why not call and inquire about how you can help? The Salvation Army in Blue Point, NY (631-363-2136) and Soldier’s Angels http://soldiersangels.org/holiday-adopt-a-family-program/ and Toys of Hope http://www.toysofhope.org/adopt_family.html and The Retreat (for domestic violence victims) http://www.theretreatinc.org/ are just a few local adopt-a-family programs.

Soup Kitchen: Volunteering to feed the homeless and poor at a local soup kitchen is a great way to make a difference in someone’s life and make you feel good, too. Your local house of worship or Salvation Army can direct you to the nearest facility. Here is another list: http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/cgi-bin/id/countyfb.cgi?county=Suffolk-County&state=NY

Sick Children: You love children. Why not share your love with those who are suffering life threatening illnesses? You could volunteer with organizations like Make-A-Wish and be part of granting magical wishes http://suffolk.wish.org/  Or you could contact the social services department of your local hospital and ask if you can help brighten the mood of any of the children battling cancer who will be spending the holidays in the hospital and whose families might not be able to afford gifts.

It’s so easy to become a Grinch in December. Why not try one (or more) of these suggestions? I’ll bet your heart grows 3 sizes that day…

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What do you do to help get through the holidays? If you try any of these tips, please let us know how it goes! Or better yet, take a selfie doing one of these things and share it with us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram!

 

 

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Negative Pregnancy Test Again! Now What?!

By David Kreiner MD

November 30th, 2014 at 9:51 am

 

credit: davidcastillodominici/ freedigitlaphotos.net


Women confronted with a negative result from a pregnancy test are always disappointed, sometimes devastated. Many admit to becoming depressed and finding it hard to associate with people and go places where there are pregnant women or babies, making social situations extremely uncomfortable. A negative test is a reminder of all those feelings of emptiness, sadness and grief over the void infertility creates.

We don’t have control over these feelings and emotions. They affect our whole being and, unchecked, will continue until they have caused a complete state of depression. This article can arm you with a strategy to fight the potentially damaging effects that infertility threatens to do to you and your life.

First, upon seeing or hearing that gut-wrenching news, breathe.
Meditation — by controlling and focusing on your breathing — can help you gain control of your emotions and calm your body, slow down your heart rate and let you focus rationally on the issues. It’s best to have your partner or a special someone by your side who can help you to calm down and regain control.

Second, put this trauma into perspective.
It doesn’t always help to hear that someone else is suffering worse — whether it’s earthquake or cancer victims — but knowledge that fertile couples only conceive 20% of the time every month means that you are in good company with plenty of future moms and dads.

Third, seek help from a specialist, a reproductive endocrinologist (RE).
An RE has seven years of post-graduate training with much of it spent helping patients with the same problem you have. An RE will seek to establish a diagnosis and offer you an option of treatments. He will work with you to develop a plan to support your therapy based on your diagnosis, age, years of infertility, motivation, as well your financial and emotional means. If you are already under an RE’s care, the third step becomes developing a plan with your RE or evaluating your current plan.

Understand your odds of success per cycle are important for your treatment regimen. You want to establish why a past cycle may not have worked. It is the RE’s job to offer recommendations either for continuing the present course of therapy — explaining the odds of success, cost and risks — or for alternative more aggressive and successful treatments (again offering his opinion regarding the success, costs and risks of the other therapies).

Therapies may be surgical, such as laparoscopy or hysteroscopy to remove endometriosis, scar tissue, repair fallopian tubes or remove fibroids. They may be medical, such as using ovulation inducing agents like clomid or gonadotropin injections. They may include intrauterine insemination (IUI) with or without medications. They also may include minimal stimulation IVF or full-stimulated IVF. Age, duration of infertility, your diagnosis, ovarian condition, and financial and emotional means play a large role in determining this plan that the RE must make with your input.

There may be further diagnostic tests that may prove value in ascertaining your diagnosis and facilitate your treatment. These include a hysteroscopy or hydrosonogram to evaluate the uterine cavity, as well as the HSG (hysterosalpingogram) to evaluate the patency of the fallopian tubes as well as the uterine cavity.

Complementary therapies offer additional success potential by improving the health and wellness of an individual and, therefore, her fertility as well. These therapies — acupuncture, massage, nutrition, psychological mind and body programs, hypnotherapy –
have been associated with improved pregnancy rates seen when used as an adjunct to assisted reproductive technologies.

A negative pregnancy test can throw you off balance, out of your routine and depress you. Use my plan here to take control and not just improve your mood and life but increase the likelihood that your next test will be a positive one.

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What have you done to get through the disappointment?

 

photo credit: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/CouplesPartners_g216-Depressed_Young_Couple_p104407.html

 

 

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Long Island IVF Fur-Baby Holiday Photo Contest

By Tracey Minella

November 21st, 2014 at 12:34 pm

 

Credit: Minion by Liz W


When you’re infertile and longing for a baby to hold and love, life can be exceptionally lonely…unless you have a dog. Or a cat. Or some other four-legged furry thing to love.

A “fur-baby”.

Many couples’ pets help get them through the infertility journey. While they are not babies, of course, they definitely help fill the void. They are soft and warm and needy. They offer unconditional love and tons of kisses. And many even tolerate being dressed up for holiday pictures.

At this time of year, it can be particularly hard to handle the onslaught of photo holiday cards from friends and family showing off their children in matching red and green outfits. So to create a diversion and to celebrate the adorable fur-babies in your life, we had a great idea…

Send us a photo of your fur-babies. They can be dressed up for a holiday… or not. Upload the photo in the comments section of this post on our Facebook page anytime from now until 5:00 pm EST on December 18, 2014.

[We’re required to post a bunch of rules despite the simplicity of the contest, but don’t let the obligatory legalese dampen your enthusiasm to enter your fur-baby! But do read the rules at the bottom of this post in their entirety (sorry!)]

We will randomly select three (3) fur-baby photos, using random.org (or a similar automated random selection system) and announce the selections on December 19, 2014. Each of the three (3) Fur-babies will receive a $50.00 Petco Gift Card!

You do not need to be a patient. You can only enter once. You do not have to “like” our Facebook page in order to enter (but we’d love it if you did!) Remember the selections are by an automated computer system, it is not a judged contest.*

So go on and grab that camera! We can’t wait to see your adorable fur-babies.

NOW HERE ARE THE OFFICIAL CONTEST RULES:

 

Long Island IVF 2014 Furbabies Contest Rules

CONTEST RULES: We’re looking for your best photos of your furbabies! Whether they’re dressed up, doing something funny, or just plain being cute, post your photo in the comments below and you could win a $50 gift card to Petco!

*Only provide photos for which you own the rights (i.e. you took it). By submitting a photo, you represent that you own the rights to it, and consent to Long Island IVF’s public usage of your photo on their website and social media channels. There will be no compensation for use but photo credit will be provided. This contest is no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook.

1. Eligibility: Contest open to anyone over the age of 18 with a Facebook account. Employees of Long Island IVF (the “Sponsor”), its advertising or promotion agencies, parent companies, service providers, agents, officers, subsidiaries or affiliates, or any other persons or entities directly associated with the Contest (collectively, the “Contest Entities”) and members of the immediate families of and/or persons living in the same household as such persons, are ineligible to enter the Contest. Contest is subject to all applicable federal, state and local laws. This Contest is void where prohibited.

2. How to Enter: To enter, submit a photo that you have taken of your furbaby on the Long Island IVF Facebook page. There is a limit of one entry per household. No responsibility is assumed for late, lost, damaged incomplete, illegible, or misdirected submissions. No responsibility is assumed for technical, hardware, software or other online entry malfunctions of any kind or unavailable network connections, or failed, incorrect, incomplete, inaccurate, garbled or delayed electronic communications caused by the sender, or by any of the equipment or programming associated with or utilized in the Contest which may limit the ability to participate, or by any human error which may occur in the processing of the submission. If for any reasons (including infection by computer virus, bugs, tampering, unauthorized intervention, fraud, technical failures, or any other cause beyond the control of the Sponsor, which corrupts or affects the administration, security, fairness, integrity, or proper conduct of the Contest), the Contest is not capable of being conducted as described in these Official Rules, Sponsor shall have the right, at its sole discretion, to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend the Contest.

3. Requirements of Entries: Each entry must be the original work of the entrant, and must not infringe upon the copyrights, trademarks, rights of privacy, publicity or other intellectual property or other rights of any person or entity. If the entry contains any material or elements that are not owned by the entrant, and/or which are subject to the rights of third parties, the entrant is responsible for obtaining, before submission of the entry, any and all releases and consents necessary to permit the use and exhibition of the entry by Sponsor in the manner set forth in these Official Rules, including without limitation, name and likeness permissions from any person who appears in or is identifiable in the entry (or their parents or legal guardians if such persons are minors). Sponsor reserves the right to request proof of these permissions in a form acceptable to Sponsor from any entrant at any time. Failure to provide such proof may, if requested, render entry null and void. Entrant understands that Sponsor has no obligation to display, publish, or otherwise include the entry in any Sponsor publication or Website. By submitting an entry, entrant warrants and represents that he/she, on his/her own behalf and on behalf of any children or legal wards of the entrant, if any, depicted in the entry, and any persons appearing or who are identifiable in the entry (or their parents or legal guardians if such persons are minors), consent to the submission and use of the entry in the Contest and to its use as otherwise set forth herein. By submitting your entry, you agree that your entry conforms to these Official Rules and that Sponsor, in its sole discretion, may disqualify your entry for any reason, including if it determines, in its sole discretion, that your entry fails to conform to these Official Rules in any way or otherwise contains unacceptable content as determined by Sponsor, in its sole discretion. By submitting your entry, entrants grant to Sponsor and its parent companies and affiliates an unlimited, transferable, exclusive license to use their entry/photograph on Facebook, in editorial publications, advertising material, for promotional purposes, on websites or in any other media form whatsoever that Sponsor may choose without further compensation unless otherwise prohibited by law. By submitting your entry, you agree to assume all liability for and indemnify and hold harmless Sponsor, Facebook, and each of their respective parents, subsidiaries, affiliates, employees, contractors and agents from any and all claims arising out of the publication or use of your entry, including without limitation any failure of your entry to comply with these Official Rules or any representations being made by you herein.

4. Judging: Winners will be selected randomly using a random number generator in conjunction with a list of entrants organized in chronological order of submission date.  Entries are accepted until 5:00 pm EST on December 18, 2014. Winners will be announced on the Long Island IVF Facebook page on or by December 19, 2014. It is the entrant’s responsibility to check the Facebook page for this announcement, and follow the provided instructions for claiming the prize. Failure to do so within 10 days will result in forfeiture of the prize.

5. Prizes: Three (3) winners will be chosen to receive one (1) $50 gift card to Petco.

6. General Conditions: By participating in the Contest, each entrant agrees to release, indemnify and hold harmless Sponsor, Facebook, and each of their respective parent companies, affiliates, subsidiaries, employees, contractors and agents from any and all liability for injuries and damages sustained in connection with participation in the Contest and publication of winner’s photo.  By accepting a prize, each winner grants to Sponsor and its parent companies and affiliates the right to use his or her name, likeness, image, voice, testimonial and/or biographical information, as well as the name, likeness, image, voice, testimonial and/or biographical information of any children appearing in the entry, in advertising and promotion in all media without further compensation or permission, except where prohibited by law.
Sponsor of this Contest is Long Island IVF (Sponsor) 8 Corporate Center Drive, Melville, NY 11747.  This Contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook.

 

* Hey did we mention that this contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook and each entrant or participant completely releases Facebook from any and all claims??

And if you’re not too tired to keep reading…

LONG ISLAND IVF was nominated BEST IN VITRO FERTILITY PRACTICE in the Long Island Press’s “Best of Long Island 2015 contest. If you’d like to vote to help us win, you can vote once per day from now through Dec 15 here: http://bestof.longislandpress.com/voting-open/

Photo credit: our good friend Liz and her taco dog, Minion

 

 

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