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Archive for the ‘Free basic Micro-IVF Contest’ Category

Long Island IVF’s Extreme Family Building Makeover Free Micro-IVF Winner is…

By Tracey Minella

September 4th, 2012 at 7:19 am

I can’t sleep tonight. It’s 1:00 a.m. now and I know that many of the eligible winners are tossing in their sleep, too. 

I am torn between extreme sadness for the wonderful entries that weren’t chosen as the Grand Prize winner this year…and the extreme happiness I feel for the entrant who was chosen as this year’s Grand Prize winner . She will be getting a knock on her front door in about 5 hours. It turns out that this year, the winner is a local woman. In the past, we’ve had local and out-of-state winners. We’ve had winners for videos and winners for essays. This year, we have a secondary infertility winner for the first time. 

I soooo wish I could be there for the moment the prize is awarded, but I can tell you what I expect will happen. I’ll paint you a picture of it. I won’t post this until I know she’s been told though, so it’ll be after8:00I bet. 

Dr. Pena and some of the Long Island IVF staff, and a video crew have synchronized their watches and will sneak up the front lawn of the winner’s home at precisely 7:00 am. They will have balloons and probably a giant “free micro-IVF” certificate (like the fake “checks” lottery winners are presented) in hand. Maybe a local news reporter will even drop by. 

Ding. Dong. Will she be awake? Asleep? Presentable? 

 HOME?! 

Of course, she’ll be home. I hope she is surprised. I hope winning makes it easier for her to drive by the bus stops tomorrow. I hope she smiles for a month. Or two. Or nine. 

Congratulations to Jessica for “We’ll NEVER Stop Hoping”, for winning the Grand Prize free micro-IVF cycle! View…and share… her AMAZING winning video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HzTjikZFbY 

Thank you to all who entered the contest this year. We were touched by your infertility stories and grateful that you chose to share them. Please do not give up on your dream. This year’s winner, Jessica, did not win last year’s contest, but she came back and tried again this year. She even entered both an essay and a video! Though you may understandably be disappointed, we hope you join us at Long Island IVF in wishing Jessica and Rob good luck as they embark on the next step in their family-building journey. And we hope that if you haven’t conceived before the next contest, that you will enter again next year. 

Please stay tuned for upcoming contests, raffles and give-aways, plus news on grant programs, studies, and other financially-friendly programs for family-building at Long Island IVF. The best way not to miss them is to bookmark this blog or like us on Facebook. 

Become a regular contributor here and get to know us; let us get to know you and tell us what you need so we can do our best to provide it. One of our Facebook fans made a great suggestion and we’re working on a new contest based on it. So talk to us… and to each other. This is your space.

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If you could pick the next contest, what would it be and what would the prize(s) be?

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LIIVF Announces Fourth Early Entry Winner in Free Micro-IVF Contest!

By Tracey Minella

August 28th, 2012 at 11:48 am

It’s finally over. At midnight on Sunday night, the “Extreme Family-Building Makeover” Contest we launched during National Infertility Awareness Week in April came to a close.

Now all that’s left is choosing the Grand Prize winner of the Free Micro-IVF Cycle. A panel of LIIVF doctors and staff are carefully considering all entries, both video and essay, to make the difficult decision. The decision will be revealed one week from today…on the morning of September 4, 2012…right here on the blog.

If the winner is local, she may find out from one of the Long Island IVF doctors in person by a knock on the door. How exciting! So if you live on Long Island or in Brooklyn or Queens and haven’t already done so, please email Lindsay your home address (at her email address below). Don’t worry though. If the winner is local but is not home next Tuesday morning, she will not forfeit the prize. And as we indicated, you don’t need to be local to win. A prior winner from Georgia didn’t find out she’d won in person.

We know all the entrants are dying of the suspense. And we know we can’t really take your mind off the results. But we can provide a bit of distraction. First, by reminding you of our fun weekly photo caption contest, called Nearly Wordless Wednesday. Each week we put up a fun photo to caption and the person who submits the best entry wins a little gift card. It may be to Starbucks or Dunkin Donuts or McDonalds. Who knows? It only takes a minute to enter and you have all week to think of something since the contest is open until each Tuesday at midnight EST. So go over there now and try your luck.

The second way to distract you is to award the final early bird incentive prizes for entries received in August. Each month the essay and video entries that get the most “likes” and/or comments win an early entry incentive prize, or in the event of a tie, the prize is awarded at the discretion of LIIVF. Today’s prize is awarded based on August entries. August was a quiet month for video entries but many essay entries came in.

Congratulations to Valerie for her essay entry which had the most activity (i.e. comments/replies/likes) of all the August entries. Valerie, please email your full name and address to Lindsay at lmontello@liivf.com so we can send you your prize: a beautiful, hand-made fertility-themed necklace from Hoping Believing Waiting, identical or similar to this one.

Again, thank you all for sharing your stories. We hope getting your story out was therapeutic. An essay or video telling the story of your fertility journey will make a wonderful personal keepsake for the future, whether or not you win the Grand Prize.

We know it’s hard to wait. But at least it’s not a 2 week wait! Hang in there.

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Micro-IVF Can Further Reduce Rare Risk of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome

By David Kreiner MD

July 17th, 2012 at 6:29 pm

Recent media attention* regarding the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) in in-vitro fertilization (IVF) cases– estimated by most sources at three percent (3%) for patients undergoing traditional IVF — has increased interest in minimal stimulation IVF, also known as Micro-IVF or Mini-IVF.  

Long Island IVF’s Micro-IVF program is five (5) years old and is registered with the Society of Assisted Reproductive Technology separately as East Coast Fertility under the medical directorship of Dr. David Kreiner and embryology directorship of Dr. John Moschella, who have a combined fifty years of IVF experience.

Since the merger of East Coast Fertility with Long Island IVF in October, 2011, the pregnancy rate for women under 35 years of age exceeds 50% per transfer with MicroIVF.  

Using clomid and two days of lowest dose gonadotropin hormones, this minimal stimulation has a 0% incidence of OHSS at Long Island IVF.  

Furthermore, a Micro-IVF procedure costs $3,900.00 plus the cost of the medications, and $500.00 for optional anesthesia.  

In tune with the safer minimal stimulation IVF, Long Island IVF also offers their Single Embryo Transfer (SET) Program to motivate patients to select the very safest procedure by avoiding the increased risk of multiple pregnancyassociated with a multiple embryo transfer.  Patients electing SET for traditional IVF or Micro-IVF pay nothing to freeze excess embryos and store them up to a year.

Certainly those concerned about OHSS, or those looking for a less costly alternative to traditional IVF should inquire about whether Micro-IVF–successfully performed by Long Island IVF’s doctors for five years—might be for them.

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Long Island IVF is holding its annual “Extreme Family-Building Makeover” contest to award a Free basic Micro-IVF cycle, valued at $3,900.00, to a woman without (or who has exhausted) infertility insurance coverage. You do not have to be a LIIVF patient or even a New York resident. Contest ends August 26, 2012. For details, rules, and to enter, click here: http://bit.ly/LHbmQR

Have you experienced severe OHSS during traditional IVF that required hospitalization? If so, did it stop you from pursuing traditional IVF again? Would you consider Micro-IVF?

*This letter was prompted in response to today’s New York Times article, entitled “High Doses of Hormones Faulted in Fertility Care”, by Jacqueline Mroz. See the full article here: http://nyti.ms/OJT4yu

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Dr. Kreiner’s Letter to the Editor of Newsday

By David Kreiner, MD

July 12th, 2012 at 3:29 pm

credit: wpclipart.com

 

Long Island IVF’s co-founder, Dr. David Kreiner responds to the assertion that in-vitro fertilization, or IVF as it’s known, is a treatment of “last resort”. Here is his letter to the Editor of Newsday published on July 8, 2012:

“ Adrian Peracchio wrote an interesting account of in vitro fertilization, a technology that is now 34 years old ["The future is now," Opinion, July 1]. As stated in the article, IVF is a procedure that was born in a hailstorm of controversy and remains today accountable for 3 percent of all births in the developed nations.

A reason for IVF’s rise in popularity is a tremendous improvement in success rates. As reported in the June 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, live birthrates with IVF approximate natural conception in fertile couples. Also, IVF reaches success rates as high as 80.7 percent for couples using donor eggs after three cycles.

Peracchio points out that the cost of IVF, as much as $15,000 in many centers, is often not covered by health insurance, and that IVF was intended as a “last resort” treatment.

This is a misunderstanding of IVF as an alternative only after the failure of less aggressive treatments — such as inseminations with fertility drugs. Insurance providers cover the drug treatment, which is ironically more expensive. Fertility drug treatments can lead to multiple pregnancies and premature deliveries. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we could save $1.1 billion a year if single embryo transfers with IVF were performed instead.

It is a shame that the technology developed by Robert G. Edwards for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine remains available only to a minority of couples and is still not recognized by insurance companies.”

Dr. David Kreiner, Plainview

Editor’s note: The writer is the co-founder of Long Island IVF, an infertility care center.

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We’d love your thoughts here on the blog.

But if you’d like to respond to this article on Newsday.com and reply to the thread of unsympathetic comments, the link to the letter is here: http://bit.ly/NcuEwn (I’m guessing a stress-busting vent session will result for anyone willling to take up the cause!)

 

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Figuring out YOUR Odds of a Live Birth With IVF

By David Kreiner MD, and Tracey Minella

July 2nd, 2012 at 8:35 am

 

 

Statistics can be confusing. And when you’re on fertility meds and your hormones are raging, it can be hard to think clearly. So grab a cup of coffee and your thinking cap because you’re going to be interested in this post from Dr. Kreiner.

It’s about a recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine that finally sheds light on a woman’s odds of having a live birth from IVF. The study examined data from SART (Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology), the primary organization that collects data, sets the guidelines, and helps maintain the standards for the practice of assisted reproductive technologies.

Dr. Kreiner reports:

NEJM Study Uses SART Data to Determine Cumulative Birth Rates for Individual Patients with In Vitro Fertilization

A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine links data from the SART Clinic Outcome Reporting System to individual women who underwent cycles from 2004 to 2009.  In this way a cumulative live birth rate over the course of all their cycles could be determined.

The researchers reviewed data from 246,740 women, with 471,208 cycles and 140,859 live births, found that live-birth rates declined with increasing maternal age and increasing cycle number when patients’ own oocytes were used, but live-birth rates remained high in donor egg cycles. See Luke et al, Cumulative Birth Rates with Linked Assisted Reproductive Technology Cycles, N Engl J Med 2012; 366:2483-2491 June 28, 2012. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1110238

By the third cycle, the conservative (patients who underwent fewer than three cycles were assumed not to get pregnant) and optimal estimates of live-birth rates (patients with fewer than three cycles were assumed to have a live birth) with autologous oocytes had declined from 63.3% and 74.6%, respectively, for women younger than 31 years of age to 18.6% and 27.8% for those 41 or 42 years of age and to 6.6% and 11.3% for those 43 years of age or older. When donor oocytes were used, the rates were higher than 60% and 80%, respectively, for all ages. Rates were higher with blastocyst embryos (day of transfer, 5 or 6) than with cleavage embryos (day of transfer, 2 or 3).

At the third cycle, the conservative and optimal estimates of cumulative live-birth rates were, respectively, 42.7% and 65.3% for transfer of cleavage embryos and 52.4% and 80.7% for transfer of blastocyst embryos when fresh autologous oocytes were used.

The study looks for the first time at a “cumulative live birth rate” for each patient going through three embryo transfers. They provide a range based on those patients who did not proceed with subsequent cycles assuming no pregnancy for lower end and live birth in upper end. They do not go into number of embryos transferred or multiple pregnancies.  This provides the best data we have available to answer the question of what the odds are that a patient will experience a successful live birth with IVF.  Understanding that the data is now a little dated and represents a national average, my expectation is that on the average we should see even somewhat better success.

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What did you think of the study? Any questions? Ask Dr. Kreiner right here.

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Your Wildest Dreams Can Come True

By Tracey Minella

June 28th, 2012 at 9:00 am

Some ladies have crushes on their RE. Do you ever dream about your IVF doctor?

Ever fantasize that he comes to you in the wee hours of the morning, a hulking presence walking through the misty fog just past dawn? You feel the excitement in the thick air as he moves toward you with hurried anticipation. He meets your gaze and whispers “Let’s make a baby…”

Phew, is it getting hot in here or is it just me?

Well, for one lucky woman, this dream will come true on September 4, 2012! That woman would be the winner of Long Island IVF’s “Extreme Family-Building Makeover” Contest. She will receive a Free basic Micro-IVF cycle, valued at 3,900.00! And if she happens to come from the Long Island or Brooklyn area, she may get the good news by a personal visit from one of our doctors on the day after Labor Day!

The annual contest launched during National Infertility Awareness Week in April and runs through August 26, 2012. You can enter by essay or video. Please see full rules here:

http://blog.longislandivf.com/2012/win-a-free-basic-micro-ivf-cycle-in-long-island-ivfs-extreme-family-building-makeover-contest/

You can also get to the rules via Long Island IVF’s Facebook Page at: http://www.facebook.com/longislandivf and clicking on the “Contest” tab.

 In addition to the awesome Grand Prize of a Free basic Micro-IVF cycle, there are early incentive prizes awarded each month of the contest, so get those entries in, ladies.

A prior Micro-IVF winner tucks her baby boy in each night in Georgia. Will you be next?

 

 

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The Hole

By Tracey Minella

June 18th, 2012 at 9:23 pm

 

I’m emotional today. I got to relive my personal IVF experience today during a video shoot for an upcoming LIIVF video. The highs and lows of several years.

Maybe you are emotional, too.

You may be emotional from medications, from opening a baby shower invitation, from an insensitive comment, or from yet another negative pregnancy test. I’ve been there. I spent years there.

I call those years “The Hole”.

I didn’t realize at the time… as I was living the day to day, minute to minute hell of infertility…that it was the hole that it in fact became. I was too busy surviving it all.

It’s a survivor’s thing, I guess. When a major life crisis like cancer or autism or infertility hits, it plucks you out of the regular world and dumps you into another place. A dark and scary place full of uncertainty and fear and broken dreams.

A hole.

I wish I could spare you. I wish I could guarantee that happy ending, that light at the end of the tunnel. But I can only hope that the hole is not too deep. That it doesn’t steal too much of your life, as it did mine. That another hole won’t follow.

Fortunately, we all will see an end to our infertility journeys. Some journeys are long, others short. But they all do end. You won’t be in treatment TTC for 20 years (though it may feel that way). It may end with a baby that’s genetically connected, or not, or, in some cases it may end without a baby. Happily, advances in assisted reproductive technology make the last scenario less likely.

My point is that there are things you are not doing, not enjoying right now because your happiness…or unhappiness…is controlled by your infertility. It’s understandable to tell yourself you’ll do those things soon… right after you get pregnant. And to protect your heart by thinking this will be the month it happens. But when it doesn’t (again), you can lose sight of the time that is actually passing. You’re putting the rest of your life on hold. And life is passing you by like the blur in your peripheral vision.

Reclaim it. It takes effort not to allow infertility to pull you into the hole. Herculean effort, at times. I didn’t have the insight. I didn’t have someone who’d walked in my shoes to tell me about the hole. But I’m telling you, though.

Because whenever… and however… it is that you do eventually get out of the hole, you will look back and wonder where those months or years went. And no matter how happy you are to have that miracle baby, and how worthwhile you feel the whole journey was, you can’t get that time back. Trust me… it’s no fun to admit I can’t remember anything fun between 1992- 1998.

It’s summer and social calendars are active. Please resist the urge to say “no” to all of the social outings and events. Skip those that are too difficult, of course, but don’t deny or isolate yourself so much that you slip away completely. Make memories you can share with your future children.

Defy the hole.

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Has your journey been a hole? When did you realize that?  If you were able to defy the hole, how did you do it?

 

Photo credit: http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/hledej.php?hleda=black+hole

 

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Infertile Men are Fathers, Too

By Tracey Minella

June 17th, 2012 at 8:56 am

If you are a man who wants to be a father, but infertility is standing in the way, I don’t have to tell you how tough it is getting through today. If male factor infertility is all or part of the problem, there’s often an added level of misplaced guilt as well. And if you’ve lost your own dad along the way, the day is even worse.

I could tell you to take care of yourself today, but you’re probably more concerned about your wife or partner. How she wants the baby, the card and the homemade clay presents that Father’s Day is supposed to be about.

If you’re seeing your own dad… and siblings with children will be there… there can be guilt about not making grandchildren yet and the sense of urgency to do so while he’s still alive. But you will manage, despite the ache in your heart, to smile for your dad today and to play a little catch with those nephews.

And you may have to endure the insensitive and hurtful comments…sometimes directly targeted at your manhood… by ignorant brothers or in-laws. You know the ones. I won’t repeat them. But you’ll laugh it off to keep the peace and pretend it’s the barbeque smoke stinging your eyes.

Today I want you to know that you are a dad. You’re a father “in-the-making”.

Good dads are selfless. They put everyone else’s needs before their own. They take care of their wives and their parents. They often hide their pain. Without realizing it, some practice their “dad skills” on nieces and nephews. They get stronger by facing and overcoming adversity. Their commitment to their wife deepens by battling this challenge together.

All this crap you are going through… this journey… has either given you or fine-tuned all the traits you need to be a great dad someday.

So, Happy Father’s Day to a great dad-to-be. And I hope that next year will be the year of the baby to complete the deal.

To our patients who have already become fathers, Happy Father’s Day. Enjoy those miracles… and their homemade clay presents!

Happy Father’s Day to the wonderful doctor dads of Long Island IVF…great men and loving fathers/grandfathers who use their gifts every day to help build our families.

And finally, Happy Father’s Day to my husband Adam, not just for being the wonderful father I knew he’d be, but for hanging in there during the many years of our own 7 fresh IVF cycles journey to parenthood.

If winning a free Micro-IVF cycle (valued at $3,900.00) would assist you on your infertility journey, please enter Long Island IVF’s “Extreme Family-Building Makeover” Contest. Details are on the April 23, 2012 blog post or click here: http://blog.longislandivf.com/2012/win-a-free-basic-micro-ivf-cycle-in-long-island-ivfs-extreme-family-building-makeover-contest/

 

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Tell us how you get through days like this. Did anyone say something hurtful? How did you respond?

Photo credit: http://www.wpclipart.com/holiday/fathers_day/index.html

 

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Does Your Boss Know You’re TTC?

By Tracey Minella

June 4th, 2012 at 9:40 am

The only thing worse than going through infertility is the stress of keeping it a secret. Especially from your boss.

Some women may be open about it to family and close friends, but even they don’t tell their employers. They fear it could cost them future promotions or even their jobs. Or their health insurance.

Some women with structured, inflexible jobs suffer incredible stress over trying to schedule their morning blood work and sonograms and fertility-related procedures. Teachers often have to wait until big school breaks or summer vacations to do IVF.

To be fair, some employers would be very supportive if they knew.

If you missed my blog on Saturday, check it out to see just how supportive an employer can be. Mine not only knew I was trying to conceive, they were helping to make it happen! Obviously, that’s an extremely rare exception.

If IVF is in your future, please consider entering our contest to win a FREE Micro-IVF cycle. The details are right here on the April 23, 2012 blog. Enter today!!!!!!! A prior winner in Georgia tucks her baby in bed each night. You could be next. And stay tuned for the announcement of the first early entry winner from April/May this week.

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Have you told your employer about your infertility struggles? If so, how did it go? Are you glad or do you regret it? Please share your experience here to help others who aren’t sure if they should tell or not.

Photo Credit: http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=18493&picture=unhappy-office-worker

 

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Find Gratitude and Hope on Memorial Day

By Tracey Minella

May 28th, 2012 at 8:12 am

 

Finally, a holiday that doesn’t absolutely require your presence at a family event. Just a day off to relax…something we all need.

Sure you may be invited to a barbeque, but bailing on it is more acceptable than, say, ditching Christmas Day. So, feel free to bail on it if you don’t want to be grilled. You come first. The family will simply have to live without your fabulous 7 layer dip.

After all, today is really about taking time to remember those heroes who’ve made the ultimate sacrifice so that we can live in and enjoy the freedom we do. And when you focus on the idea that people have given their lives for us…really focus on it… it can free you from feeling sorry for yourself for just one day.  It can bring out feelings of gratitude and hope…feelings that can be very hard to find on an infertility journey.

Think about that. A stranger – countless strangers, actually — gave his life for you. His mother, wife and children will never see or hold him again. Think of the female soldiers, too, many who died before becoming mothers. Whatever dreams they may have had for their future will not come true.

I’m not trying to make you cry here. Just trying to get in touch with your inner gratitude and hope. You have family and friends who love you (even if they seem to do or say the wrong things lately). And you have hope for the future. Hope to realize that dream of the family you’ve always wanted.

Whatever you do today, please take a moment to remember what you DO have, and why you have it. And be grateful that the dream that brings you to this page is something that is not only possible in this country, but grows more reachable each day due to advances in ART technology.

But most of all take care of yourself… and your heart… today. Because there is hope for tomorrow.

And to our patients, past and present, who are or who love someone in the military, Long Island IVF thanks you from the bottom of our hearts for your sacrifices and courage.

Don’t forget to enter your essay or video in our Extreme Family Building Makeover Contest. See the April 23, 2012 blog post for entry details.

YOU COULD WIN A FREE MICRO-IVF CYCLE VALUED AT $ 3,900.00!!!

And check back later this week as we announce the winners of the first early bird entry for May!! There’s still time to get your entry in for May early bird consideration.

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What are you doing for Memorial Day? And if you are going to be around people who “grill” you about having a baby, what’s your comeback strategy?

Photo credit: http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=21971&picture=national-cemetery

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