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Archive for the ‘frozen embryo transfer’ Category

4 Hot Fertility Questions at ASRM 2016

By David Kreiner MD

November 7th, 2016 at 7:45 am

The theme for the 2016 ASRM (American Society for Reproductive Medicine) conference in Salt Lake City, Utah was “Scaling New Heights in Fertility”.  As one whose life on Long Island sheltered me from views of snow-capped mountain tops, the perspective of the attendees appeared to climb higher and perhaps to possibilities never previously conceived.

I summarize here 4 Hot Fertility Questions that were debated and discussed in the conference:

1)      Should PGS screening be routine for all IVF patients?

2)      Should all IVF transfers be restricted to blastocysts only?

3)      Should we freeze all embryos and transfer in an unstimulated cycle?

4)      What is the best treatment for the patient with diminished ovarian reserve?

Should PGS screening be routine for all IVF patients? 

The theoretical benefit of Pre-Implantation Genetic Screening, or“PGS”, testing is that it allows one to select a single “tested normal” embryo in the presence of multiple embryos which is more likely to implant and less likely to miscarry.  Absent testing the chromosome number of the embryos, to insure a similar chance of conception one might transfer two embryos– increasing the likelihood that twins would result in a pregnancy at greater risk for prematurity and complications affecting the health of the babies.  Most miscarriages are the result of abnormal chromosomes and if the embryos had normal chromosomes then there should be less of a chance the pregnancy would result in miscarriage.

The argument against routine PGS testing is based mainly on the fact that the test is not 100% accurate or predictive of either normalcy or abnormalcy in addition to not obtaining a result in some cases.  It is argued that the error rate is only 1% but there is a phenomenon called mosaicism where an embryo may have more than one cell line. It is not rare that an embryo which has an abnormal cell line in addition to a normal one can, during development, shed the abnormal cells and evolve normally.  However, PGS testing may pick up only the abnormal cell or detect both normal and abnormal and then there is the question of what to do with the mosaic embryos since there is no current way to predict whether these embryos will ultimately be normal.

Another argument against routine PGS testing is that most abnormal embryos never implant anyway and that perhaps the reduction in miscarriages with PGS is not as great as predicted.  Still another argument that holds true for younger patients in particular is that the pregnancy rate for a single blastocyst transfer is nearly as high without PGS testing and that one can achieve equal success without the risk of discarding potentially normal embryos.

Should all IVF transfers be restricted to blastocysts only?

In addition to improving the ability to select the best embryo, the proposed advantages of a blastocyst transfer (typically 5-6 days old) versus a cleaved embryo transfer (usually 3 days old) include the following:

  • an embryo transferred 5-6 days after ovulation is closer to the natural physiologic state
  • there are thought to be fewer uterine contractions 5-6 days post ovulation than 3 days;
  • blastocysts have a larger diameter and are thought to be less likely to be pushed into the fallopian tubes—which may lead to a lower ectopic pregnancy rate;
  • there is a shorter time to implantation and therefore less opportunity for a deleterious event to occur to an embryo in the uterus.

However, there are some patients, in particular older or those with more fragile embryos, which have been shown to fail to conceive on multiple occasions after a blast transfer but successfully get pregnant and deliver healthy babies after transfer of cleaved embryos.  Furthermore, there is evidence that in some of these cases embryos that may have been destined to otherwise result in a normal pregnancy may fail to develop to blast in the laboratory.

Should we freeze all embryos and transfer in an unstimulated cycle?

There is a growing consensus nationally among IVF programs that the endometrium is less receptive to embryo implantation during a stimulated cycle–especially one in which the estradiol and/or progesterone levels are high.  Although convincing patients to delay transfer to a subsequent unstimulated cycle is a challenge, growing evidence is pushing the field in this direction.

What is the best treatment for the patient with diminished ovarian reserve?

Optimal treatment of the patient with diminished ovarian reserve remains a challenge to the IVF program.  There is growing evidence that adjuvant therapy, including such things as acupuncture and Chinese herbs as well as supplements such as CoQ10 and DHEA, may improve a patient’s response to stimulation and improve pregnancy rates.  Other strategies include sensitizing follicles with estradiol and/or Growth Hormone pre-treatment and banking embryos from multiple cycles with transfer during an unstimulated cycle.  Still another strategy is milder stimulation in an attempt to improve the quality of the retrieved egg/s.

There were many heights achieved during this meeting and to this boy from Queens I was impressed not just with the science and the breathtaking vistas of the regal mountains forming a horseshoe around Salt Lake City but also with the most pleasing goodness of the people native to the city who genuinely offered their time to help make our experience a pleasant one.

 

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To Single Embryo Transfer (or Not to)?: That is the Question

By Tracey Minella

February 11th, 2015 at 12:24 pm

 

Credit: stockimages/ freedigitalphotos.net


One of the hardest parts of undergoing in vitro fertilization is the difficult decision of how many embryos to transfer back…because each embryo transferred has the potential to implant and develop into a baby.

In the 1980s when IVF was new and success rates were understandably low, it was common to transfer as many as 6 embryos back. Even then, many women did not conceive. Others conceived multiple pregnancies. Still others conceived only one.

Happily, today the technology has been dramatically fine-tuned, resulting in much higher IVF success rates and, because fewer embryos are being transferred, fewer multiple pregnancies.

Some women can’t or don’t want to have a multiple pregnancy and are interested in a program that virtually eliminates the risk of more than a singleton pregnancy. Some of their reasons include possible health risks for the mother or babies, concerns over the higher costs of raising multiples, or the fear of being placed on bed rest and its potential financial impact.

On the other hand, because IVF can be expensive and often not covered by insurance, and because the couples attempting it may have already been trying to conceive for a long time with and without medical assistance and expense, it’s tempting to want to “put all your eggs in one basket”. These couples want to transfer a higher number of embryos back to maximize their chance of conceiving in that one cycle or because they can’t afford to do more cycles. Many couples think of the possibility of twins as a bonus. Two-for-one. Instant family. Dream come true.

But if the financial burden was lessened, and the odds of a live birth from transferring one embryo were nearly comparable to the odds for transferring more, would that make a difference to you? Would you opt for the statistically safer singleton pregnancy vs. the statistically riskier multiple pregnancy? Would you really prefer a multiple pregnancy or would you rather have a succession of singleton pregnancies, the way you originally planned before infertility entered your life?

Deep, emotionally-charged decision. No right answer. Just the right answer for you.

Some good news that may affect your decision is 20-year study of 92,000 patients from Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland, recently published in the on-line Oxford Journal, Human Reproduction, on January 21, 2015. The Nordic study found that the health of children born from IVF has significantly improved and that the risks of pre-term or severely pre-term births have declined dramatically…and it’s primarily due to transferring just one embryo. In addition, the stillborn and infant death rate for singletons and twins born through IVF has declined. http://bit.ly/1Ejgg1o

For those interested, Long Island IVF has a well-established Elective Single Embryo Transfer Program with success rates comparable to traditional IVF in select patients. If you elect to transfer one embryo in your fresh cycle you get free cryopreservation of your embryos and free storage for six months or until a live birth occurs. As an additional incentive to motivate patients to make safer choices, we offer patients transferring a single embryo during their fresh stimulation cycle up to three frozen embryo transfers, within a year of their retrieval or until a live birth occurs, for the price of one. For more details and information on whether SET may be right for you, visit http://www.longislandivf.com/single_embryo_transfer.cfm or ask your LIIVF physician.

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What did/would you consider when deciding how many embryos to transfer? Is the elective SET program something you did/would consider? Why or why not?

 

 

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5 IVF Retrieval Blizzard Preparedness Tips

By Tracey Minella

January 26th, 2015 at 3:58 pm

credit: PeterGriffin/public domain photos.net

So, you went through all the blood work, sonograms, and injections for your IVF cycle and you wake up on the morning of your retrieval…if you even got any sleep the night before… ready for the big day.

 

Only problem is that blinding white glare streaming into the room.

 

“What the #@*%!” A snow storm hit overnight. Three feet down already and still falling fast. It’s gonna take all morning to dig out the car. Hey, where is the car?

 

Then your blood runs cold as you remember the biggest rule of all: “Don’t be late for your retrieval!”

 

Timing of the HcG shot and the subsequent retrieval is critical, so that the eggs are retrieved before they are ovulated. Then the next worry hits: “Even if I get there, will my doctors make it in?”

 

Fortunately, today’s meteorologists generally predict major storms enough in advance for patients and doctors to put contingency plans into place. Retrieval and transfer patients may be given special instructions and suggestions when a blizzard is expected.

 

If you anticipate a winter retrieval, in addition to allowing lots of extra time and filling the gas tank up, consider these 5 IVF Retrieval Blizzard Preparedness Tips:

 

  1. If there’s talk of snow, line up driveway plowing or shoveling extra early, or park the car down near the end of the driveway (but not in the street) so there’ll be less to shovel to get out. (Note: Ladies with swollen ovaries full of follicles should not shovel.)

 

  1. Call your town offices the day before, explain your medical situation, and beg them to have your road plowed early and often, if possible.

 

  1. If you don’t have one, line up borrowing an SUV or have a friend with an SUV drive you to the retrieval.

 

  1. Know the names of hotels near your clinic or hospital and consider staying in a hotel the night before retrieval if you live far away.

 

  1. Last resort: Call your local police department or fire department for help. Explain the situation and your need to get to the hospital or clinic immediately.

 

 

If despite the best planning, you’re running late on retrieval day, call your doctor’s office or service and tell them what’s going on and follow whatever instructions they give you.

There’s usually a small time window built into the schedule to accommodate for such an emergency, so don’t panic until you talk to them.

 

Because a retrieval can’t be postponed once the HcG shot has been given…even for a blizzard of potentially historic proportions… arrangements are made for Long Island IVF’s team of doctors, nurses and embryologists to stay local and to have reliable transportation so you can rest assured they will be there for your big day.

 

Remain positive and calm. And when it’s all over, you’ll have an interesting story to tell or excerpt to write in your fertility journal.

 

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Did you ever have a retrieval or transfer in a blizzard? How did it go and do you have any other tips to add?

 

Credit: Peter Griffin/http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=4893&picture=snowed-in&large=1

 

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Long Island IVF WINS “Best In Vitro Fertility Practice” in Best of Long Island 2015!

By admin

January 20th, 2015 at 2:28 pm

 

It is with humble yet excited hearts that we announce that Long Island IVF was voted the Best In Vitro Fertility Practice in the Best Of Long Island 2015 contest. Unlike prior years, for the 10th anniversary of the BOLI contest, there could only be one winner per category with no runners-up.

We just received word that we won. Thanks to all of you!

The doctors, nurses, embryologists, and the rest of the Long Island IVF staff are so proud of this honor and so thankful to each and every one of you who took the time to cast a vote in our favor. From the moms juggling LIIVF toddlers… to the dads coaching LIIVF teens…to the parents sending LIIVF adults off to college or down the aisles… to the LIIVF patients still on their journeys to parenthood who are confident in the care they’re receiving…we thank you all.

We love what we get to do every day…build families. And that’s all the thanks we really need. But your endorsement of us to your friends, families, and the public (by voting for us) means so much and will enable us to help even more infertile couples fulfill their dreams of building a family.

As we usher in 2015…our 27th year…we will continue to offer our unique blend of cutting-edge medical technologies and holistic, personal support… wrapped in the comfort of a private, non-hospital setting.

Thanks again. Happy New Year to all.

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“Why Don’t You Just Adopt?”

By Tracey Minella

November 15th, 2014 at 12:28 pm

 

 

credit: David castillo dominici/ freedigitalphtos.net


Someone somewhere has or will ask you this question. As if it’s that simple. As if it’s their business.

November isn’t only the month of Thanksgiving, the official kick-off to the holiday season. It’s also National Adoption Awareness Month. The photos of orphaned children awaiting their forever families tug on our hearts. Without doubt, adopting a child is one of the most generous, selfless, loving things a couple can do.

But it’s not for everyone. And even for those who are open to the possibility of adoption, it often takes some time to come around to and embrace the idea.

And that’s okay.

While plenty of people…fertile or not… choose adoption right off the bat, many infertile people want to try to have a biological child before considering adoption. It’s natural to want a baby with daddy’s eyes or mommy’s musical talent…it’s natural for a woman to want to experience the joys of pregnancy and childbirth. Asking this question not only discounts those feelings and dreams, but also throws in a heap of unwelcome guilt. How could we be so selfish to want a child “of our own” when there are already children waiting?

Don’t feel guilty for wanting to exhaust all options of having a baby genetically tied to you before considering other choices like adoption or remaining childless. Each infertility journey is different and the fantasies we initially have of how our journey will play out get molded by our experiences, and evolve with each setback, failed cycle, or loss. Marriages are tested. Financial, physical, and emotional factors must be considered. Often, time and these experiences make people realize that they want more than anything to have a baby to love, and they may soften to the idea that genetic ties are not a priority. But it takes time for many to come to that realization. And it involves working through many issues and letting go of other dreams, which can be hard. And this can’t be rushed. Again, adoption is not for everyone.

In the spirit of keeping an open mind about the process, there is an option for family-building that many couples are not aware of and it’s offered at Long Island IVF. It’s called Embryo Donation. Often mistakenly referred to as embryo adoption, Embryo Donation allows infertile couples to acquire and use the excess frozen embryos created by another couple who’ve completed their own family and prefer to donate rather than use or discard their frozen embryos.

The recipient couple then simply proceeds with the thawing and transfer of these embryos as if they were originally their own. There may even be enough embryos to have more than one pregnancy. Though these children don’t share your genes, you get to experience childbirth and are in control of the pregnancy.

The cost of Embryo Donation is a fraction of traditional IVF as the embryos are donated and there is no need for stimulation and retrieval as in traditional IVF. Medications and monitoring are minimal, keeping costs low. For more information about Long Island IVF’s Embryo Donation Program, please contact the Donor Program Coordinator, Vicky Loveland, or click here: http://bit.ly/1CaZwfS

Let your personal journey to parenthood unfold as it’s destined to. Contrary to how it may feel sometimes, the infertility journey won’t last forever. Your heart will lead you to the child you’re meant to parent, whether biological, adopted, or otherwise.  And when you arrive there, you will feel that this was exactly as it was meant to be.

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Have you adopted, or would you consider adopting if you can’t get pregnant? What do you say when someone asks “Why don’t you just adopt?”

 

 

 

 

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National Twins Days

By Tracey Minella

July 30th, 2014 at 10:22 pm

 

image courtesy of david castillo dominici/freedigitlaphotos.net


Twins. Gotta love ‘em.

For the majority of couples struggling with infertility, the idea of having two babies at once…especially in cases of a long, expensive treatment history… is a dream come true. Times two! For some, twins are a “two-fer” that helps “justify” the expense of IVF and IUIs. Twins are also a great way to quickly “catch up” in the total number of children department. After years of having none, suddenly you are the parents of two… instant “standard American family”. In fact, many call it quits after twins.

On the other hand, twins (or triplets) make others nervous. The fact is that a multiple pregnancy can be more complicated than a singleton. Many infertile couples have stressed enough over just getting pregnant and may prefer to avoid the additional worries a high risk multiple pregnancy sometimes presents. This fear, coupled with financial incentives, has driven the popularity of quality Single Embryo Transfer (SET) programs which may offer comparable success rates. For information on Long Island IVF’s SET Program success rates and incentives, click: http://www.longislandivf.com/single_embryo_transfer.cfm

But those lucky enough to have twins will agree that once they arrived safely, it’s mostly two times the pleasure and two times the fun.

This year, August 1-3 is the National Twins Days Festival. http://www.twinsdays.org/, which is billed as the largest annual gathering of twins in the world.

We are inviting all our parents of twins (or more) who are so inclined, to SHOW US YOUR TWINS! Upload your favorite photo to our Facebook page any time between August 1-3. We want to see all those cuties…the ones born this week, the ones who are leaving for college, and the ones in between!

Your success will give others hope. (But those who find viewing baby photos difficult will have advance notice to avoid viewing those posts on the page on those days.)

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If you could control it, would you prefer having twins or one baby at a time?

 

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The Dilemma of Excess Embryos

By Tracey Minella

January 25th, 2014 at 9:32 am

credit: wiki commons public domain

 

There is so much to focus on when beginning IVF. Insurance and financing issues. Learning about all the medications, as well as how to inject many of them. Understanding the processes of daily monitoring and blood work, of retrievals and transfers. Deciding how many embryos to transfer back and whether to cryopreserve the others.

Most people do cryopreserve the embryos which are not transferred back on a fresh IVF cycle. These frozen embryos are often thawed and used in a later cycle, either years later after a successful fresh cycle or sooner if the fresh cycle was unsuccessful.

Sometimes, especially in cases where patients only transfer back one embryo, like patients in Long Island IVF’s Single Embryo Transfer Program http://bit.ly/1jjvr3y patients may obtain enough embryos from their first fresh IVF cycle to satisfy all of their family-building needs through subsequent frozen embryo transfers. They may have one baby, then another a few years later, and then yet another…all from one retrieval. Yes, they are the lucky ones.

I remember… almost casually… signing off on the cryo consent, my primary focus being on all the matters that had an immediate effect on my first fresh cycle. I wanted to be pregnant now. I’d worry about what to do with any leftover frozen embryos… after I had all the children I wanted … later. It took a few cycles before I finally had any embryos left over to freeze, but the moment I did, I set in motion a decision more complicated and emotional than I initially imagined.

What to do with excess embryos is about as personal a decision as there is. If you don’t have too many, do you keep transferring them until they are gone? Do you donate them…full genetic siblings to your other children…to another couple? Do you donate them to research if your state allows? Do you just keep them in storage and pay the fees? Do you discard them?

I was reminded of the difficulty of this decision when I read about New Zealand’s law limiting the amount of time that embryos can remain in storage to ten years. http://bit.ly/1f7uypm . Fortunately, there is no such law in New York. It is stressful enough for patients to decide what to do with excess embryos without the government imposing an arbitrary time limit on them.

There is no single right answer. Just a right answer for you.

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If you cryopreserved embryos, are you comfortable with your initial decision on how they should be handled? Or are you undecided?

 

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Grieving Lost Embryo Siblings

By Tracey Minella

January 7th, 2014 at 9:51 am

 

image: anankkml/freedigitalphotos.net

 

Is it common for those born through IVF to grow up to grieve their “sibling embryos” that were not born…either because they were never transferred or because they failed to survive the transfer or at some point thereafter?

As an IVF mom, I was intrigued by an article I read this week in LifeNews.com* about a woman who grieves her lost embryo siblings. The woman complained that no one understands her overwhelming grief… including her own parents… and that there are no appropriate support groups for IVF children who feel like she does. Will my IVF children feel this way someday? Is there anything I can do to prevent that from happening?

I wonder how many IVF children suffer from this grief and guilt. If given a name, would we call it “Survivor Embryo Syndrome”? Does it occur more often in only children born through IVF…children who may be longing for a sibling? Or is it extremely rare and that’s why support groups don’t seem to exist?

There are countless grown women and men who were conceived long ago through this miracle technology and could possibly be struggling with such feelings.

These adults were conceived before today’s recommended single or double embryo transfers…probably back when four embryo transfers were the norm. Imagine being the only one out of four embryos that survived?  Wouldn’t it seem natural to often wonder “Why only me?”

Then again, sometimes all four embryos survived. In past decades, selective embryo reduction was often used in high order multiple pregnancies. A difficult and personal decision (and a controversial topic not without its own risks) selective reduction may be used to reduce the number of a high order multiple pregnancy, from quadruplets to twins or from triplets to a singleton, for example. It’s hard to imagine the conflicted feelings some of the surviving children of such cases might experience.

Why am I here and they are not?

Hopefully, IVF parents who may understandably be blinded to the plight of their lost embryos by their extreme thankfulness for the one that did survive will be mindful that their miracle may grow up with some survivor guilt issues.

If my own IVF daughter shares these feelings with me someday, I will certainly acknowledge them and help her process them in the same way we’ve always discussed how she came into this world. Age-appropriate information shared in many open discussions that always focus on our determination to have a baby and how very much we loved her even before she was born. I tell her that it was fate that she was the one we were meant to have at that given time, even if it’s sad that so many other embryos with the potential for life did not come to be. I tell her there is a reason she is here and to live her life to the fullest, use her talents, be happy, be charitable, and do good things. And if she still needed more help than I could give her, I’d encourage her to talk with a professional counselor with experience in infertility-related issues, such as Long Island IVF’s Bina Benisch, MS, RN. http://www.longislandivf.com/mind_body.cfm

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What do you think about this survivor guilt issue? How would you comfort your IVF child or what would you do to prevent them from feeling any guilt over being survivors?

 

* http://bit.ly/1dLdiHM

photo credit: anankkml/ http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=100140080

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 34: Fertility Treatment During This Economic Downturn

By David Kreiner MD

December 5th, 2013 at 7:57 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers the final chapter, Chapter Thirty-Four: Fertility Treatment During This Economic Downturn. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=149

Fertility Treatment During This Economic Downturn


Financial hardships have increased fertility challenges for many couples attempting to build their families.  In regions where patients do not have insurance coverage for their IVF procedures it is unlikely that they proceed with the treatment that is necessary for them to be able to complete their families.

In places that do provide coverage for IVF, such as Massachusetts, 5% of all babies born are as a result of IVF.  Elsewhere in the U.S., IVF accounts for only 1% of births suggesting that the financial cost of IVF denies access for approximately 80% of couples in need.

The problem of the cost of IVF is compounded by the fact that patients are driven to transfer multiple embryos to limit the cost and avoid additional fees from cryopreservation, embryo storage and frozen embryo transfers.  These multiple transfers increase the risks of multiple pregnancy and preterm delivery with subsequent complications to the babies from preterm birth.

We, at Long Island IVF, attempt to make IVF more accessible and safer by offering income based grants, free cryopreservation, storage and discounted frozen embryo transfers to patients electively transferring single embryos.  We have also offered free IVF cycles through best video/essay contests to a few needy patients over the past few years.

It is our sincere wish and hope that a bill that is presently in front of Congress offering a tax credit to patients going through IVF is passed thereby making IVF that much more affordable to our patients in need.

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about fertility treatment during this economic downturn? Are you aware of the pending proposed Family Act, which would offer a tax credit to infertile women wishing to undergo infertility treatment (similar to the current adoption credit for those wanting to pursue adoption)? Have you urged your legislators to support this important legislation?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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Infertility and National Prematurity Awareness Month

By Tracey Minella

November 19th, 2013 at 10:53 am

 

photo credit: praisaeng/freedigitalphotos.net

Infertility is a disease. Its course often follows a common progression. It often starts with the abandonment of what turns out to have been unnecessary birth control. It then progresses through a repeated series of monthly disappointments until charts, thermometers, and the “chore-mentality” move into the bedroom. ObGyn intervention becomes an RE referral. A battery of tests and invasive procedures follow. Sometimes there’s Clomid. Maybe even ovulation induction with IUIs. Possibly, there’s IVF.

It’s no wonder that most infertility patients are so caught up in the all-consuming grind of simply trying to get pregnant, that they don’t think past getting that positive pregnancy test. They don’t think that…after all that time and sacrifice…something could threaten that hard-earned pregnancy.

It’s National Prematurity Awareness Month. And there is no better time to focus on what you can do to reduce your chances of having a premature baby than before you become pregnant.

It’s not always known why babies are born prematurely, but according to the Mayo Clinic*, some risk factors can include:

  • Pregnancy with twins, triplets or other multiples
  • Problems with the uterus, cervix or placenta
  • Smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol or using illicit drugs
  • Poor nutrition
  • Some infections, particularly of the amniotic fluid and lower genital tract
  • Some chronic conditions, such as high blood pressure and diabetes
  • Being underweight or overweight before pregnancy.

 

According to the CDC**, some of the symptoms or warning signs of pre-term labor include:

  • Contractions (the abdomen tightens like a fist) every 10 minutes or more often.
  • Change in vaginal discharge (leaking fluid or bleeding from the vagina).
  • Pelvic pressure—the feeling that the baby is pushing down.
  • Low, dull backache.
  • Cramps that feel like a menstrual period.

If you are doing IVF, one of the things you may want to consider to reduce your chances of prematurity is having a single embryo transfer (“SET”), if your doctor feels you are a good candidate. Doing so virtually eliminates your chance of a multiple pregnancy. In addition to the safety considerations for mother and baby, SET at Long Island IVF offers financial incentives, including free cryopreservation and reduced rates for subsequent frozen embryo transfers. Click here for more information about Long Island IVF’s Single Embryo Transfer Program. http://bit.ly/WpzCvv

As an IVF mom of two preemies myself, let me acknowledge that very often, babies arrive early for reasons beyond our control. Sadly, the outcomes are not always happy. But knowledge is power, so control what you can, watch for the signs, and listen to that little voice if you feel something is amiss. And remember that the vast majority of these hard-earned pregnancies do turn out just fine.

*http://mayocl.in/HWaNGz

** http://1.usa.gov/IdCytZ

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Do you worry about prematurity? If so, would you consider SET to reduce the chance of a multiple pregnancy?

Photo credit: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=100141619 /praisaeng

 

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