CALL US AT: (877) 838.BABY


Archive for the ‘Men’s Health’ Category

How to Support an Infertile Man on Father’s Day

By Tracey Minella

June 17th, 2017 at 9:06 am

 

image: tminella


Infertile “dads-in-waiting” are no different when it comes to being infertile on Father’s Day than infertile wannabe moms are on Mother’s Day.

They want a baby.

A daddy’s little girl around whose little finger to be proverbially wrapped. A “mini-me” son to hang out with.

But society doesn’t seem to see his pain… because he is quiet. Maybe even to his wife or partner.

Women are more likely to chat with their sisters or closest girlfriends about their infertility—they cry on each other’s shoulders and talk about treatment—but men just don’t really do that. They don’t open up like that. Women talk. But guys’ group conversations tend to gravitate towards sports or politics—not how they injected their wife with a two-inch needle last night or held her as she cried over another negative pregnancy test.

Many men think they have to be the strong one– because if she sees him crumble, she may unravel herself. How unfair is that? Yet that’s how it is for so many guys and it’s completely understandable, and yes, a bit sexist, how they are willing to take all the pain on their shoulders if it’d shelter her.

Imagine that pressure to be strong and not cry? Imagine the totally unfounded but very real guilt he may feel if the diagnosis is male factor infertility? Or the stress he’s under if they can’t afford infertility treatment because his insurance or his salary doesn’t cover it? Or how he’s keeping the secret and hoping the guys don’t find out and rag on him about specimen collection or awkwardly joke about how they can help get her pregnant.

And don’t think for a minute he’s not aware of the children of other men at the gathering. Especially on Father’s Day. Kids playing catch with their dads. Dads showing pictures from the dance recital.

If his relationship with his own father is a good one, it may help to spend some one-on-one together on Father’s Day focusing on his role as the son. Maybe reflect on what kind of father he plans to be when the time comes for him—what he loved about his dad’s parenting style and what he might do differently.

Most importantly, let him do what he wants. See or be with who he wants and be sure to run interference for him with difficult people when you can. If he wants to be around the nieces or nephews, indulge his wish even if you feel differently. Or be alone together—or let him do his own thing–if that’s what he needs for that day.

And don’t ask him about starting a family. Just don’t. Ever. Especially on Father’s Day.

There is no substitution for a baby on Father’s Day, but you can give him hope for one next year. And if you think he’d benefit from talking it out with a caring infertility specialist, Long Island IVF offers group and individual counseling. Some couples have found a special connection to others who understand what they are going through and have even remained friends after their infertility journeys have resolved.

* * ** * * ** * * * * * * *** **

What are your plans for Father’s Day?

no comments

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About LGBT Family-Building Options at Long Island IVF

By Tracey Minella

June 16th, 2017 at 2:37 pm

 

Whether you are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer/gender-fluid, you aren’t any different than heterosexuals who want to start a family but need medical intervention to do so.

You have the same dream of becoming a parent, the same longing in your heart for a baby of your own, the same frustrations and embarrassment about needing medical intervention for such a private matter, the same worries about affording and financing the treatment, and the same paralyzing fear of it not working.

And yet, you are different from the heterosexuals who are suffering from infertility. Your treatment needs are different. Your emotional needs are different. We understand that.

Long Island IVF pioneered IVF on Long Island, bringing Long Island its first IVF baby, first baby from a cryopreserved embryo and first donor egg baby. For almost 30 years, we’ve been serving both the heterosexual and LGBT communities on Long Island. Several of our staff are members of the LGBT community as well and many staff members were former patients—so we really do understand where you are coming from.

The easiest way to illustrate the differences between heterosexual and LGBT family-building is to begin with the similarities.

In heterosexual family-building, any number of factors may be causing the couple’s infertility. It could be female factors like poor egg quality, blocked fallopian tubes, uterine issues like fibroids, endometriosis, hormonal disorders like polycystic ovarian syndrome, recurrent miscarriage, and more. It could be male factor infertility due to poor quality sperm. Or it could be a combination of male and female factors—or simply be due to the frustrating diagnosis of “unexplained infertility”. When a couple is unable to get pregnant after 6-12 months of trying (the number of months differs based on age), they are considered to be infertile. Sometimes less aggressive medical approaches—such as intrauterine insemination (“IUI”) with or without ovulation induction do result in pregnancy. Oftentimes, more aggressive Assisted Reproductive Technologies (“ART”) like in-vitro fertilization (“IVF”) are in order.

Here’s a crash course in IVF 101.

In IVF, the goal is to have the woman develop more than the one mature egg she would normally produce in a typical monthly menstrual cycle. To accomplish this a woman’s ovaries are stimulated through the use of injectable hormone medications and careful monitoring by ultrasound and bloodwork so that at just the right time, the multiple eggs that have matured are retrieved from the ovaries transvaginally through needle aspiration under sedation. Then the eggs are either frozen or are combined with the partner’s sperm to produce embryos. The resulting embryos are then either transferred back into the woman’s uterus where they will hopefully implant and result in a pregnancy, or are frozen for future use, or a combination of the two options. Because the number of embryos transferred back into the uterus is both limited and controlled, IVF minimizes and virtually eliminates the risk of a multiple pregnancy, making it a safer treatment option.

Sometimes, a heterosexual couple needs help from a third party to build their family. They may need a sperm donor or an egg donor if the couple’s own sperm or eggs are not sufficient or of good quality. Or they may need a woman to act as a gestational carrier to carry their embryo(s) and resulting pregnancy if the uterus of the woman of the couple is either absent or not otherwise suitable.

Now let’s look at how LGBT family-building is different.

Well, for starters, virtually all LGBT couples need some kind of help from a third—or even a fourth—party in order to build their family. In fact, in virtually all cases, sex alone will never result in a pregnancy for the LGBT couple without outside intervention. So, while it does happen that a LGBT patient could have a medical factor making them infertile, in the vast majority of cases, LGBT couples seek out an infertility specialist to obtain the “missing contribution” that is required to make a baby. The exception is the transitioning individual who has not begun hormonal treatment to transition from male to female or from female to male.

Here are the general treatment options and the ways “missing contributions” for LGBT couples can be obtained. They are slightly more straightforward in the cases of lesbians and gay men than in transgender cases.

Lesbian couples:

Two women will need a sperm donor. Depending on their age and the health of their eggs and uterus, they can do IVF and may even be able to do an IUI. If doing IVF, some couples decide to use one woman’s egg and have the other woman carry the pregnancy in her uterus.

Gay couples:

Two men will need an egg donor. They will also need a gestational carrier who will carry the pregnancy in her uterus for them. Gay couples may decide to divide the number of eggs retrieved from the egg donor in half and then each partner may contribute a semen specimen to fertilize half of the eggs—thereby each being a biological father to the embryos that resulted from their contribution.

Transgender couples:

Transgender family-building is relatively new in comparison to lesbian and gay family-building which the LGBT community has been able to access for decades. There are varied options for transgender family-building, but they all require knowledge and proactive steps on the part of the transgender person.

The single most important takeaway from this article for transgender folks who do (or may in the future) want to have a biological child is this: See a reproductive endocrinologist BEFORE taking any medical or surgical steps on the transgender transition or sexual reassignment journey.

In “Woman to Man” reassignment, before the woman hormonally, medically, or surgically becomes a man, she should consider having her eggs retrieved and frozen for future use. Or if she has a male partner now, her eggs can be fertilized with his sperm and the embryos either implanted in her uterus now so she can carry the baby before she transitions, or if the woman does not want to carry the pregnancy and prefers to move ahead with the transition, then the embryos can be frozen and transferred into the uterus of a gestational carrier at any time.

However, if the woman who transitions prefers a female partner, then the couple has most of the same options as any lesbian couple. They could use either woman’s eggs with donor sperm and the resulting embryos could be implanted into the partner with the uterus or into the uterus of a gestational carrier if needed. Some couples choose his eggs and her uterus so both can be involved.

Now the opposite case.

In “Man to Woman” reassignment, before the man hormonally, medically, or surgically becomes a woman, he should consider having his sperm frozen for future use. Sperm freezing is so much cheaper and easier than egg freezing. If he has a female partner now and they want to become pregnant now, his sperm can be used to impregnate her through IUI or, if she undergoes IVF, then her retrieved eggs can be fertilized with his sperm and the resulting embryos either implanted in her uterus now or frozen for later use. Some couples choose his sperm and her eggs and/or uterus so both can be involved. If his female partner’s eggs or uterus are not optimal, they will need an egg donor and/or gestational carrier.

However, if the man who transitions prefers a male partner, then the couple has the same options as a gay couple. They could use either of their sperm with the egg donor’s eggs and transfer the resulting embryos into a (gestational carrier) woman’s uterus.

If you identify as queer or gender-fluid, you can utilize donor egg, donor sperm, a gestational carrier or any combination of the above options as they fit you and your partner.

Sadly, not all physicians realize or advise transgender individuals of their fertility-preservation and family-building options before the transition process has begun, so it is up to you to initiate the discussion or take action. It is absolutely critical that egg and sperm freezing be done before the hormonal, medical or surgical transition or reassignment begins. Or it will be too late.

Despite the current and uncertain political climate, there has never been a better time for LGBT members to pursue family-building. As a result of rapidly advancing ART, today’s LGBT community has choices beyond the noble but limited options of foster parenting and adoption—choices that allow for biological children. The lesbian and gay parents of recent decades have blazed a path of slow but ever-increasing acceptance that has not only benefitted today’s lesbian and gay parents, but has helped open the door for the transgender population to come out and claim their own fertility and parenting rights.

All people of reproductive age who are considering becoming parents at some point would benefit from a fertility screening by a reproductive endocrinologist—ideally sooner rather than later. At that exam, screening tests would be conducted to identify any actual or threatened obstacles to fertility, such as diminished ovarian function or premature ovarian failure or other factors in women, or sperm issues in men. Depending on what is found, proactive steps could be taken to preserve your fertility, including egg freezing for women who just want to preserve their young and healthy eggs for use at a future date.

Also file this important bit of information away and hope you will never need to remember it: If you or a loved one are ever faced with a cancer diagnosis and time allows for it, egg-freezing and sperm freezing done prior to starting certain chemotherapy or radiation protocols for certain cancers are options to preserve your fertility. That way, your healthy eggs and sperm are waiting for you when you’re ready to build your family after your cancer battle has been won. Be sure to call a reproductive endocrinologist to discuss fertility preservation before cancer treatment.

If you would like more information on LGBT parenting options  or would like to schedule an initial consultation with a reproductive endocrinologist, the doctors and staff at Long Island IVF have been helping build LGBT families for decades and would be happy to help you. With several offices throughout Long Island and one in Brooklyn, we’re conveniently located near you.

As a partner of the LGBT Network on Long Island, Long Island IVF is committed to continuing to build families for the LGBT community through cutting-edge medical technology and sensitivity to all patients’ individual needs.

Long Island IVF, along with the LGBT Network, offers free LGBT family building seminars every June and periodically throughout the year. Click here for information and to preregister for the June 29th event.

no comments

One Year Later: Reflections on #OrlandoStrong and Hate Crimes against the LGBT Community

By Tracey Minella

June 12th, 2017 at 9:45 am

 

Image: Ryan McGuire/Gratisography.com


Today marks a somber day in LGBT history—one to reflect upon and remember.

Last June, from our sponsor table in the Family Services Pavilion at Long Island’s Pridefest 2016 celebration, the Long Island IVF team was able to witness and be a part of the pride and happiness of the LGBT community mingling peacefully and openly on a beautiful sunny afternoon.

Little did anyone know at that time that only hours after the event would end, the worst mass shooting in US history would happen in Orlando.  Fifty innocent lives would be taken and as many others would be injured. People just like those whose company we had just enjoyed. Regular people with their whole lives in front of them…targets of hatred in an increasingly ugly world. A world which in the months since then has become politically altered and alarmingly unstable for all—particularly the LGBT community.

It didn’t feel right to post Pridefest photos or talk of the positivity surrounding it in the wake of such a loss. But continued “radio silence” on Pridefest would be a disservice. It would be a lost opportunity to talk of and celebrate all that it was and, more importantly, all it must continue to be. There must be pride. There must be solidarity. In the face of hate, there must be love. And there must be real change.

There must be more than just a uniting of the LGBT community within itself –there must be support from those outside the LGBT community, too. Just as the world came together in vigils to support the LGBT community and to mourn those lost in Orlando, it must continue to look out for all people until the hatred is replaced by acceptance. Until there isn’t a need to designate “communities” anymore.

Prejudice and ignorance are frustratingly slow learners, so this change will require persistence. But despite the Orlando tragedy, we mustn’t lose sight of how far the gay rights movement has come, especially in recent years. And Pridefest is one of so many milestones of the movement. We mustn’t lose ground despite the political climate and a rising swell of previously-stifled but ever-brewing bigotry, hate, and violence.

Long Island IVF is proud to have supported the LGBT community and helped its members fulfill their dreams of parenthood for decades. None of us can undo these senseless deaths, but we can join together to create new life. If you’re ready to become parents, we can help you create your family. The next generation.

In the face of hate, there must be love.

no comments

Long Island IVF and LGBT Network Alliance

By Tracey Minella

April 7th, 2016 at 4:25 am

 

image courtesy of LGBT Network


Long Island IVF is proud to partner with the Long Island LGBT Network as the exclusive family planning service for the LGBT Network community.

On April 7, 2016, Long Island IVF physicians, Dr. David Kreiner, Dr. Steven Brenner, and Dr. Satu Kuokkanen presented a check in the sum of $17,000 to LGBT Network’s Jonathan Chenkin, Development Officer for Corporate and Business Relations and Robert Vitelli, COO – Director of Development. This donation will fund and support our mutual educational and outreach efforts here on Long Island.

Long Island IVF has been building families in the LGBT community for decades and has long practiced its belief that every person is entitle to become a parent. Not only are some staff members also members of the LGBT community, but our entire staff has been trained to be sensitive to our LGBT patients. Your needs and treatment are unique and your comfort is important to us.

Long Island IVF will again sponsor the Family Services Pavilion at the Long Island Pridefest on June 11, 2016. Be sure to come by and meet our team. Some of our patients and their little miracles often drop in, and they love to share their LIIVF family-building experience with others just starting their journeys.

If you’d like to schedule an initial consultation with one of our physicians, please call 877-838-BABY today. With six offices across Long Island and Brooklyn, there is sure to be one convenient to you.

* * ** ** * *** * **** *

Will we see you at Pridefest?

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Long Island IVF-WINNER: Best in Vitro Fertility Practice 2015 AND 2016

It is with humble yet excited hearts that we announce that Long Island IVF was voted the Best In Vitro Fertility Practice in the Best Of Long Island 2015 and 2016 contest…two years in a row!

The doctors, nurses, embryologists, and the rest of the Long Island IVF staff are so proud of this honor and so thankful to every one of you who took the time to vote. From the moms juggling LIIVF babies… to the dads coaching LIIVF teens…to the parents sending LIIVF adults off to college or down the aisles… to the LIIVF patients still on their journeys to parenthood who are confident in the care they’re receiving…we thank you all.

We love what we’ve gotten to do every day more than 28 years…build families. If you are having trouble conceiving, please call us. Many of our nurses and staff were also our patients, so we really do understand what you’re going through. And we’d like to help. 631-752-0606.

no comments

The Male Biologic Drive to Parent

By David Kreiner MD

July 7th, 2015 at 3:01 pm

Photo credit: Valentina, proud wife and mom of Devin and Danny

Fatherhood comes in many different varieties that as a reproductive endocrinologist specializing in family building I see on a regular basis.  Whether the man is involved in a traditional heterosexual relationship or is attempting to build a family with his male partner or by himself, man… like woman… feels a biologic drive to parent.  As such, although adoption is a wonderful way to create a family, surrogacy and egg donation is appealing to male-only prospective parents because it affords them the opportunity to have a biological connection to their baby.

 

There are two types of surrogates: traditional and gestational.  A traditional surrogate supplies her own eggs and carries the baby to term.  Gestational carriers do not supply their own eggs and therefore a separate egg donor is utilized.  Unlike donated sperm, donated eggs require the in vitro fertilization (“IVF”) process involving hormonal stimulation of the female egg donor, monitoring during the 2 weeks of stimulation, and transvaginal egg retrieval which is performed under anesthesia.  Typically, the intended male father supplies the sperm and the fertilized eggs or embryos are placed into the uterus of the gestational surrogate.  Surrogates carry the pregnancy to term then surrender the baby and their parental rights to the father or male couple.  The process involves the use of assisted reproduction attorneys, and/or a donor/surrogacy agency. The entire process including IVF with egg donation, surrogacy, and obstetrical care has a cost that can be insurmountable for many men desiring to start a family, estimated to cost between $125-150,000.

 

There have been a few ways some men have successfully cut this expense.  First of all, the fee agencies charge to supply the donated eggs and the surrogates ranges from $10,000-$40,000 independent of the fee the reproductive attorney charges or the cost of psychological screening.  Some IVF programs will supply these services at a much lower cost.  In addition, these IVF programs have relationships with lesbian partners who may be interested in becoming surrogates after they have completed their own families.  Also, some income-based grants exist for male couples in need of surrogates.

 

Whatever your situation, Long Island IVF has the history, the means, the skills, and the desire to assist you in your family building journey.  We can assist you in finding the best agencies/donors/surrogates, reproductive attorneys and counselors to insure that you have the greatest chance of achieving your goal for the family of your dreams.

* * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * **

How important is it to you to have a biological child and what is the greatest obstacle to you’re facing/faced in achieving that dream?

no comments

Gay Rights Taking Baby Steps Towards Family Building

By David Kreiner MD

July 3rd, 2015 at 10:13 am

 

photo credit: Sarah Allison Photography


Today, same sex marriage is a constitutional right.

It was a long time coming with much frustration, discrimination and actual blood, sweat and tears but thanks to the recent Supreme Court landmark ruling, equal rights is now protected by the law of the nation.

Now that SCOTUS has declared same sex marriage legal in every state, what affect will that decision have on alternative family building for the LGBT community? And how quickly will any changes be implemented?

Currently, insurance companies require that lesbian couples go through 6-12 cycles of inseminations without offering their insurance benefit because they “have not been proven to be infertile”…hint-you need sperm to make a baby.  Allowing lesbian partners access to their insurance for fertility treatment without first spending thousands of dollars on inseminations to “prove infertility” would seem to be a right that follows from such legislation.

And don’t get me started on the inaccessibility of insurance for fertility for gay male couples. Currently, depending on where they live, they must obtain surrogates who receive about $25,000 as compensation and pay additional $35-60,000 agency and legal fees plus the cost of obstetrical care on top of IVF fees.  This brings the overall cost to an average of approximately $125,000.  Of interest, Apple, Google and some of the other big high tech companies have offered such coverage.

It seems to me that if we recognize that all citizens are equal regardless of sexual orientation that offering equal rights to family building is merely a logical extension of the Supreme Court decision.

Today, we rejoice for the liberating decision regarding gay marriage…tomorrow we work towards equal access to care for family building. In the meantime shall we say we are taking baby steps…

* * * * ** * * * * * ** * ** * * *** * * * **

What changes, if any, in LGBT family-building access/coverage, do you hope will come from the recognition of same-sex marriage? What roadblocks have you faced and how have they affected your family-building?

 

* * * ** *  ** * ** *** * * * ** * * * **  **

Long Island IVF-WINNER: Best in Vitro Fertility Practice 2015

It is with humble yet excited hearts that we announce that Long Island IVF was voted the Best In Vitro Fertility Practice in the Best Of Long Island 2015 contest.

The doctors, nurses, embryologists, and the rest of the Long Island IVF staff are so proud of this honor and so thankful to every one of you who took the time to vote. From the moms juggling LIIVF babies… to the dads coaching LIIVF teens…to the parents sending LIIVF adults off to college or down the aisles… to the LIIVF patients still on their journeys to parenthood who are confident in the care they’re receiving…we thank you all.

We love what we’ve gotten to do every day more than 27 years…build families. If you are having trouble conceiving, please call us. Many of our nurses and staff were also our patients, so we really do understand what you’re going through. And we’d like to help.

 

no comments

What Are the Most Important Qualities in a Reproductive Endocrinologist?

By Tracey Minella

July 1st, 2015 at 8:22 am

 

credit: David Castillo Dominici/ freedigitalphotos.net


If you are having trouble getting pregnant on your own or with your gynecologist’s help and think it’s time to be evaluated by a reproductive endocrinologist… a doctor that specializes in treating infertility…what should you look for in choosing one?

First, realize that this choice may be the difference between you ultimately having a baby or not. So choose wisely. You don’t want to waste precious time and money.

No reputable doctor should guarantee that they will get you pregnant. While the vast majority of patients can and do overcome their infertility if treated by a skilled reproductive endocrinologist (even if the journey may be long), the truth is that not every patient will have a live birth. Not every medical challenge can be overcome. But the good news is that assisted reproductive technology is always changing and success rates grow more promising every day with each new development. So remain hopeful.

Having done my share of time in the stirrups, I offer these suggestions when considering a fertility specialist:

Reputation: Do your homework. How long is the doctor practicing? Where did she train? Does the practice have a good reputation? What are the success rates for live births? If they are not as high as national standards, is it because they treat (instead of refuse) patients that might negatively affect their success rates (such as older or obsese patients)? Have the doctors or the practice received any awards or other recognition by the public or their peers in the medical community? Does your OBGYN and/or family doctor recommend or know of him? Do any of your friends or family recommend her? Do they offer grants and other financing options? Do they participate in your insurance plan if you have infertility coverage? Is the practice often chosen to conduct studies of the newest breakthroughs in assisted reproductive technology? [Note: If you consider on-line review sites, realize that in any industry (not only medicine) reviews are “ranked” by readers, so negative reviews are encouraged and even rewarded. The nature of such sites results in generally more negative than positive reviews as disappointed folks can flock there anonymously to vent, while happy folks often simply don’t think to post something positive. Also, potentially unscrupulous competitors can post negative reviews as well. So consider the reviews as only a part of the picture.]

Chemistry: The right “fit” is important. And what makes it right varies. For me, I wanted a genius with a great reputation first and foremost. If he or she had a crappy personality, I’d have dealt with it (he didn’t though). But others need a doctor with a good bedside manner…more touchy-feely. Some people think straightforward doctors are too cold. Do you like to google everything and have a doctor listen to your discoveries and concerns at length or are you more the just-tell-me-what-to-do/follow-the-doctor’s-orders-without-question type? Do you feel strongly about having a doctor of a particular sex? Are they open to your particular situation (i.e. LGBT-friendly) or your challenge (i.e advanced age or obesity?) Are the office locations and hours convenient for your work or social schedule? Are the nurses and staff friendly, helpful, and professional? For me, I expected my IVF nurse to be friendly and know who I was, yet I didn’t expect her to hold my hand and talk to me at length each day. I figured that’s what my husband and friends were for. She was pretty busy ordering my meds and updating my chart and other important things like that. But I was pleasantly surprised that when I did need a bit more time and attention, she was my cheerleader when things went well and also my shoulder to cry on when they didn’t.

When I did my homework, I learned that LIIVF pioneered IVF on Long Island, with the first IVF baby, first cryo baby, and first donor egg baby. In fact, the practice founders are together today after 27 years and have added other top notch doctors. For decades, many of the doctors have been consistently recognized as Top Doctors by the public and their peers. The practice has been voted by the public as the Best In Vitro Fertility Practice 2015. The nurses are wonderful and several have been with the practice since the beginning…and many nurses and staff have been LIIVF patients themselves, so they really understand what you’re feeling. LIIVF also has LGBT staff and has a long reputation of being compassionate and supportive in treating the LGBT community. LIIVF is often chosen as a center for the studies of the newest technologies. LIIVF also offers many grant programs and participates in annual fertility fundraising events wherein it donates a free IVF cycle as a door prize to help couples afford fertility treatment.

If you do your homework, you will find the right doctor for you. Or you can just cheat off of me…

* * * * * * * * * * ** * * * * ** **

What is the most important factor(s) in choosing a reproductive endocrinologist?

 

 

no comments

Mars, Venus, Uranus, and Father’s Day: An Infertility Lesson

By Tracey Minella

June 19th, 2015 at 10:03 am

 

Credit: vectorolie/ freedigitalphotos.net


Forget “Men are from Mars; Women are from Venus”. On days like Mother’s and Father’s Day, it’s more like “Fertile folks are from… Uranus”.

What? I meant they’re cold and distant and full of gas, of course!

Well no matter what planet they’re from, most infertile folks would rather be light years away from them on such difficult days. But since you can’t strap a rocket on their backs and send them into the stratosphere, how can you stop fertile folks from making Father’s Day even harder?

First, recognize that there is some truth to the Men/Mars and Women/Venus thing. We are different. At the risk of being accused of sexism here, what pushes women’s emotional and hormonal buttons may not have the same reaction in most men. Women in groups often talk about kids and babies and family stuff—things that are like daggers in the heart to infertile women. However, men have been known to retreat to their “man caves” to talk about “manly” things like sports or business or landscaping—things far removed from baby talk. Men seemingly let more roll off their backs. That said men may also hold their pain in.

So while your hearts in the right place with that secret plan to isolate him on Father’s Day, consider that he may actually enjoy being with the right group of guys, throwing back a cold one and flipping burgers on the grill. Or having a game of wiffle ball. Or watching a ballgame. Or fishing. So you need to really ask him what he wants to do. He may want to be alone with you, or really alone– without you. Remember how you wanted your wishes respected on Mother’s Day? Well, try to understand his now. And here’s the hard part: You may get stuck in the ladies’ chat room in order to give him what he needs on Sunday.

But either way, you should spend some time alone together on Sunday night to make sure he knows he can let his feelings out to you. And to celebrate having gotten through the day. Maybe even to look up at the night sky and make a wish…on Uranus.

* * * * * * * ** * * **

What are you doing on Father’s Day this year? Share your plans to help others who aren’t decided.

no comments

Plastics, Infertility, and Paleo: A Throwback Post

By David Kreiner MD

January 10th, 2015 at 8:45 am

 

 

credit: KeattiKorn/ freedigitalphotos.net


It’s a beautiful day in Boston today.  I am here not because of the Red Sox playoffs or Sunday’s Patriots game but rather to attend our annual ASRM national fertility meeting.

I was delighted upon greeting some former colleagues of mine from my old stomping grounds, the Jones Institute, to hear compliments about how good I looked.  (Well, if you lose 55 lbs. of “baby fat” people tend to notice.)  I explained that my son, Dan, convinced me to try the Paleo Diet, modeled after the diet of Paleolithic man.

I am intrigued that so much is known about how man from the Paleolithic age ate.  I guess he left menus and recipes on the walls of his man caves.  Anyway, the focus… aside from elimination of dairy and gluten from his diet… is avoiding processed foods and chemical additives such as artificial sweeteners.

It was while eating my veggies and bun-less burger that I came upon one of the lead stories at the ASRM in the Wall Street Journal.  The chemical BPA, or Bisphenol A, found in plastic is tied to the risk of miscarriage.  BPAs can leach into the food that is heated on it such as in a microwave or in water stored in plastic and left out in the sun.  Additionally, it was recommended to limit the use of canned foods and avoid handling cash register receipts, which often are coated with resins that contains BPA.

I’m not sure “Paleo” man extended his life, avoided disease or lived any healthier with his “natural only” diet but we have some evidence of some benefits by doing so today.  Oh, and did I mention I can fit into those jeans from my college days?

For more information on the effects of BPAs on fertility as being discussed at the ASRM, see http://bit.ly/19Q28Bt

* * * * * * * * * * *

Did you know that plastics and other items made from BPAs may be harmful to your fertility or contribute to miscarriage? Do you use these products and if so, will you consider stopping now?

Photo credit: Keattikorn/freedigitalphotos.net

no comments

Long Island IVF Builds Families for GLBT Community

By Tracey Minella

November 4th, 2014 at 6:57 pm

 

credit: david castillo dominici/free digital photos.net


Long Island IVF is so excited to return to the Long Island GLBT Expo this weekend on Sunday, November 9, 2014 at the Long Island Hilton in Melville, New York. We’ll have a raffle again, too, so be sure to stop by.

Long-committed to helping the GLBT community build their families, we love being able to reach out in person in a supportive environment like the expo. It gives you a chance to get a feel for us in a casual, rather than clinical, atmosphere. Some of our staff belongs to the GLBT community, so we understand what you’re feeling. Choosing a fertility practice is one of the biggest decisions you’ll ever make, so come over to our booth and say hello and ask us some questions.

Here’s a true story: Last year, a couple of guys (let’s call them “Max” and “Larry”~ not their real names) came by our booth at the expo. We talked. We bonded. And today, Max and Larry are a couple of proud new dads!  Their beautiful baby’s birth announcement just recently arrived. And it all started with a conversation at this expo.

There are so many options available and amazing new advances in assisted reproductive technologies that can help resolve your unique family-building challenge. We offer the most cutting edge technologies, including PGS (Pre-implantation Genetic Screening), and EEVA (Early Embryo Viability Assessment), many of which are only available at a handful of fertility centers in the country. We have pre-screened, multi-ethnic anonymous donors ready to help you, if needed. And we offer personal financial representatives to help navigate insurance issues and explain our many grant programs and flexible payment options.

We look forward to welcoming you into our family as we help you build yours.

 

LONG ISLAND IVF was nominated BEST IN VITRO FERTILITY PRACTICE in the Long Island Press’s “Best of Long Island 2015″ contest. If you’d like to vote to help us win, you can vote once per day from now through Dec 15 here: http://bestof.longislandpress.com/voting-open/

 

* * * * * * * * ** * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * *

Will we be seeing you at the expo on Sunday?

 

Photo credit: David Castillo Dominici/freedigitalphotos.net http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/latin-mother-with-daughter-and-aunt-photo-p200021

 

 

 

no comments


The Fertility Daily Blog by Long Island IVF
© Copyright 2010-2012