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Archive for the ‘Parenting’ Category

Our Pride at Long Island Pridefest

By Tracey Minella

June 13th, 2018 at 6:35 am

One of the best things about building LGBT families on Long Island and being a major sponsor of Long Island Pridefest each year is the interactions with past, current, and prospective LGBT patients. This year was no exception.

Throughout the day yesterday, the Long Island IVF booth was bursting with pride. Pride when past patients came up to us to show off the children we helped them to have. Pride when a current patient came up showing off her baby bump. But there was another kind of pride that we felt–pride for the future and the families yet to come. We were touched by so many stories, so here are a few we’d like to share.

One family was so excited to reunite with Dr. Brenner as both of their children were conceived with his help. It was touching to hear the father repeat several times “This was life-changing for us, we are so grateful.”

Got serendipity? It was a wonderful surprise that a nearby vendor couple were also prior patients who built their LGBT family through Long Island IVF. The father was actually moved to tears expressing his gratitude.

One lesbian couple, who were newlyweds, hadn’t really talked about having children yet but were noticeably excited to think about it and were surprised when we told them all the options available.

Another newly-married female couple with more of an age disparity was very interested in starting the process of having a family together because the younger partner had not yet experienced the parenting joy which the older partner with grown children has known.

A third newlywed couple—lots of newlyweds were out Sunday! — had already done a lot of homework on family-building options, but still had questions. They spoke in depth to Dr. Brenner and, since one of the women was a teacher, they were happy to learn we offer early hours to accommodate her work schedule.

And there were tons of other meaningful interactions that made us so proud to be able to help build families for the community.

Whether you were able to speak with us at Pridefest or not, we encourage any members of the LGBT community who are interested in building a family– now or maybe in the future—to come down to our free seminar on June 21st in our Melville office.

The seminar, “Building Families in the LGBT Community” is held in conjunction with our partners at The LGBT Network. Pre-registration is requested so click this link to reserve your spot.

Long Island IVF has always been a friend to the LGBT community and has been building families here on Long Island for 30 years. We hope to see you on the 21st!

 

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Click to Support IVF Insurance Coverage in NY

By Tracey Minella

June 8th, 2018 at 7:08 am

photo by rawpixel.com from pexels

If I told you to click this link now to receive a value worth over $10,000, would you do it?

If I told you to click this link now and you’d have IVF insurance coverage, would you do it?

If I told you to click this link now and it may lead you to parenthood, would you do it?

What would it take for you recognize the potential value of clicking the link?

If you or someone you know cannot access IVF for financial reasons, clicking this link could be the answer for you and other infertile couples.

If you’re reading this, the chances are that your life has been touched directly or indirectly the diseases of infertility and/or cancer. The biggest obstacle for most infertility patients is financial. Lack of insurance coverage for in vitro fertilization IVF means that many New Yorkers are unable to access the assisted reproductive technologies necessary for them to start a family. Many people cannot afford to self-pay for IVF and those who do often take on significant debt to finance their infertility treatment.

All that is poised to change. Finally. With your help. Today.

You’ve heard us mention this legislation and we are finally at a turning point! On May 15th The New York State Assembly passed the bill and it has now moved on for consideration by the New York Senate. The time to act is right now—before the Senate breaks this month. Your senators want and need to know where you stand on this important issue and that you expect their support.

One click is all it takes to tell your senator to support the Fair Access to Fertility Treatment Act (“FAFTA”) S.8841/S.3148A–legislation that will help New Yorkers build their families if they are diagnosed with infertility or with cancer or other conditions that may cause infertility.

FAFTA would update New York’s insurance law to include coverage for in vitro fertilization (“IVF”) and for fertility preservation (like egg-freezing) for those diagnosed with cancer.

One click takes you to a pre-written email letter created by our friends and infertility advocates at The Coalition to Help Families Struggling with Infertility, which represents a broad range of individuals and groups including Resolve, The National Infertility Association and the Long Island Breast Cancer Coalition. All you do is input your name and address. Click send and it will automatically be sent to your senator based on your address. Nothing to look up. Just two clicks. Two minutes and you’re done. You’ll be part of the movement. And you will feel proud and empowered.

But if you’re feeling like a super advocate after that and you’d like more information on what additional actions you can take to further push FAFTA through, Resolve has more information here. There is a similarly streamlined way to call your senator—including his/her phone number and a phone script of exactly what to say!

Encourage your senator to support this important, life-changing legislation before the session adjourns this month.

Seriously, please do it now. Because lack of money and lack of insurance coverage shouldn’t stand in the way of anyone’s dream of having a family.

Thank you for joining us in supporting legislation that will remove financial obstacles to infertility and fertility-preservation treatment so we can help you– and future generations of infertile couples—fulfill your dreams of becoming parents.

*Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels

 

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Safeguarding Frozen Embryos, Eggs, and Sperm at Long Island IVF

By admin

April 9th, 2018 at 3:27 pm

 

Liquid nitrogen cryogenic tank

At Long Island IVF, we understand from a clinical standpoint what you went through to create your frozen embryos. Several of us here are also IVF patients–some with our own embryos in the same freezers as yours. So, on a personal level, we really understand how worried you may have been after hearing about two recent and unprecedented storage tank incidents at fertility clinics in Ohio and California.

To point out that over the past 30 years nationwide, such tank malfunctions have been extremely rare does little to comfort those patients who were unfortunate enough to have suffered such heartbreaking losses. So, let me tell you about the measures that we employ at Long Island IVF to safeguard your frozen embryos.

Your frozen embryos (and frozen eggs and sperm) are guarded 24/7 by multi-level security systems designed to safeguard them from dangerous temperature fluctuations. Our cryopreservation tanks have double alarm systems which monitor both the temperature within the tanks as well as the level of liquid nitrogen (used as the coolant).

The alarm system is active 24/7 and if there is an issue not only sounds in the lab, but also sends alerts to our lab director or designated on-call lab personnel, so someone is always informed about the status of the cryogenic tanks. The alarm systems have both battery as well as generator back-up systems.

In addition to this high-tech, double alarm security system, each tank in our IVF Lab is also visually monitored by lab personnel (an embryologist or an andrologist) every day, including weekends. Finally, the cryopreservation tanks and their backup and monitoring systems, as well as the IVF Laboratory itself, undergo routine and rigorous inspections for third party accreditation organizations in accordance with industry standards.

If you are a patient and have any further questions or concerns, we encourage you to contact the office directly for more information.

 

 

 

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Infertility and Anti-Valentine’s Day

By Tracey Minella

February 14th, 2018 at 5:30 pm

image: gratisography.com-ryan mcguire

Ugh. Valentine’s Day…another rough day for many infertile couples.

Sure you can have a romantic night alone. But there’s all kinds of stress with tonight’s “expectations”. Don’t you want to scream “I really just want a snotty, crying, feverish baby to keep me up all night!”?

Frankly, there’s been enough alone time—maybe years of it. It’s time for a bunch of kids to ruin all that. Hello, universe? We’re still waiting!

Then there’s your friends. The ones with kids (which is basically ALL of them, right?) who complain how they don’t want to stay home with their little ones and can’t wait until the sitter arrives tonight so they can toast each other over a peaceful candlelight meal. That’s rough–especially when you’d give anything to have a baby hanging on your neck as you pay the Dominos delivery guy.

You can’t win. You don’t have the kids– yet. And the emotional and financial stresses of infertility take the romance out of your time alone.

So, what do you do if you don’t want to do the traditional Valentine’s Day stuff?

Why not take VD to the extreme and get all silly about it? Over-do it. Do the candy, the flowers, the candles, the rose petals, the satin sheets…the whole, cheesy cliché of it. And then laugh at yourselves. You know the laugh I’m talking about. “Your” laugh. It’s that special thing between you where one can just look at the other and you laugh uncontrollably. You could both use it.

Or do the opposite. Anti-Valentine’s Day. Defy it. No card or gift. No succumbing to the pressure of Hallmark’s holiday. Save a rose garden somewhere by rejecting flowers.

Need inspiration on how to practice extreme defiance of all things traditionally Valentine-y?

  • Skip the primp and be the low-key version of yourself.
  • Run 80 errands for the benefit of people other than yourself.
  • Have that annual GYN exam that’s overdue. It’s the easiest day to get an appointment. Who needs a card when you can have a prescription for a mammogram and a sonogram?
  • Hit the golden arches for lunch. Because nothing says Valentine’s like a Big Mac meal. Go on, supersize it.
  • The Finale: Invite your mother-in-law for dinner.

Bet your day’s looking better already. No need to thank me.

Seriously, just make it whatever you and your partner need it to be today. Don’t succumb to society’s pressures about how you should look, act, or behave. Play it up– or down. But do take a moment to be thankful for each other to lean on during these hard days. Don’t ever downplay that.

And have faith.

Because maybe next year, you’ll be greeting that Dominos guy with a baby hanging on your neck. (How’s that for extra cheese?)

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So, what are YOUR Valentine’s Day plans?

 

 

 

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Hanukkah Wishes for the Infertile

By Tracey Minella

December 12th, 2017 at 9:52 am

 

image: digitalart at freedigitalphotos.net


With the festival of lights now underway, everyone at Long Island IVF wishes all those who celebrate it a very Happy Hanukkah.

 

Like many holidays throughout the year, Hanukkah and its traditions can bring both peace and stress to those suffering from infertility.

 

Seeing the little ones squealing as they spin dreidels can be hard to take when all you want is a child of your own. Same thing goes for the gelt collection—chocolate-covered or otherwise. Of course, many of you are anxiously awaiting the day you can pass these rich traditions on to your own children.

 

The stress can even make you over-indulge in the fried-food favorites of the holiday. And no one would blame you if you did. Especially if having a mouthful of latkes is your way to avoid answering Aunt Muriel’s nosy baby questions.

 

For those who are frustrated or losing faith due to the delay in your family-building plan, I hope you’ll draw strength from the Hanukkah story and embrace the light from the candles as they are lit each evening.

 

When you feel you have only enough left in you to go on for one more day, you can.. and will… somehow inexplicably, go on for much longer than you ever thought possible. So, keep the faith.

 

And for many, you will witness a miracle.

 

 

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Could You Use $13,570 to Build Your Family?

By Tracey Minella

November 16th, 2017 at 2:07 pm

 

shutterstock


You wouldn’t want to lose $13,570, would you? Well, if you are even remotely considering adopting a child someday, you need to read on.

Both LGBT and heterosexual couples often turn to adoption to create their families. Some may go straight to adoption. Others may first try Assisted Reproductive Technologies (“ART”) like in vitro fertilization (“IVF”) and then pursue adoption if those attempts fail. And some try both adoption and ART simultaneously, ready to accept whichever brings them a child first.

For ages, adoption was the primary route many LGBT couples took to become parents. Gay men (having no eggs or uterus to work with) had little choice before the advent of donor egg and gestational carriers. Unfortunately, private newborn adoptions historically favored placement with heterosexual couples, often leaving LGBT wannabe parents to seek adoption through the foster care system. Sometimes, to reduce the wait time for placement, they’d be encouraged to consider older or special needs children.

While more open-minded than in the past, some of today’s birth parents still cling to those old prejudices when choosing adoptive parents, holding out for the so-called “traditional” parental unit–a married heterosexual couple– rather than an LGBT couple or single parent.

At Long Island IVF, rapidly-advancing assisted reproductive medical technology has opened many avenues to family-building for LGBT couples who want to have a biological child. Depending on the particular circumstances, these options may include using donor egg, donor sperm, gestational carriers, or reciprocal IVF. These advancements, coupled with hard-fought legal victories for LGBT marital and parental rights, did—and continue to– change the parenting options landscape for members of the LGBT community.

In spite of these the medical and legal developments, adoption is still the choice of many couples. The idea of giving a stable home to a foster child that is waiting for love is preferable to many couples, even those who could pursue or had success with medical options.

But whether you choose adoption or ART to build a family, there are financial concerns and the costs of either option can pose a barrier to many couples. Every financial family-building resource, benefit, insurance, or credit that exists must remain accessible to all who need it. For those who choose to adopt, that means preserving the federal Adoption Tax Credit.

There’s a lot going on in the political and infertile world—some front-burner and other back-burner movements. One of the hottest items in the news right now is the fate of the federal Adoption Tax Credit.

The federal Adoption Tax Credit is available to American families to help off-set the costs of adoption. It applies to all adoptions– private domestic, international, and through foster care.

In a nutshell, it’s a federal tax credit currently capped at $13,570 for qualified adoption expenses, though it is affected by the family’s income and tax liability. According to Resolve, the National Infertility Organization’s website:

  • Families earning over $203,540 may only claim a partial credit
  • Families earning over $243,540 are not entitled to any credit
  • Families adopting a special needs foster child may claim the maximum credit
  • The credit may be used for up to five additional years if there is not enough tax liability to apply the full amount of the credit in the first year, and it’s non-refundable.
  • The government saves an estimated $65,000-$127,000 per child that’s adopted out of long-term foster care.

The federal Adoption Tax Credit made headlines after appearing to be on the chopping block as part of the current administration’s upcoming Tax Reform proposal. This caused adoption and infertility rights advocates and religious organizations to leap into action to save the tax credit. Without it, countless children will remain in foster care because those who want to adopt them will not be able to afford to do so. Further, those pursuing private domestic or international adoptions may not be able to afford to those options without the credit.

Fortunately, the most recent reports from last week indicate that the political tide is turning in favor of saving the Adoption Tax Credit, but all those who believe it should be saved need to step up and support it. Do it for yourself or someone you love. Or just do it for the good of orphans and kind-hearted strangers. If you were adopting a child today, wouldn’t you want that tax credit?

If you’d like to lend your voice to the effort, you can contact your local representatives or join the efforts of RESOLVE–the group that fights tirelessly for the rights of all members of the infertile community. You can check out the political initiative here.

1/1/18 UPDATE: The Federal Adoption Tax Credit has been saved in the Final Tax Reform Bill! https://adoptiontaxcredit.org/

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Are you or would you consider adopting a child? Would losing the Adoption Tax Credit impact your ability or choice to adopt?

 

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You WILL Survive Your IVF Baby Leaving for College or Kindergarten

By Tracey Minella

September 6th, 2017 at 4:52 pm

 

T. Minella


By now, just about all college kids have checked in for the new school year. And the little ones started school yesterday and today on Long Island. So, all across the country there are moms and dads feeling the sting…or rather, the devastation…of saying good-bye to their babies.

But IVF parents have it worse. We love harder.

There, I said it.

It’s not that we are better parents (okay I’m lying because I think we kind of are better), but we love differently. That’s entirely because we faced the frightening reality of never becoming parents. We don’t take parenthood for granted. We worked for it. It’s something the fertile folks won’t ever understand and it doesn’t just disappear after the infertility battle is won. It’s a part of us and is always there. It often manifests itself in over-protectiveness and over-involvement. From triple-checking the baby is still breathing, to fearing sleepovers or letting others watch or drive our kids, to tracking their iPhones and monitoring their social media, the vigilant watch unfolds until one day…poof…they are gone.

First, it’s kindergarten, where you are handing them off to another adult for the better part of the day. It’s not all unicorns, rainbows, and “ready confetti”. Stressing over things like whether they will do well academically, make friends, eat alone, be included at recess, or get bullied is normal. Major stuff.

Blink and you will be dropping them off at the dorm—maybe in another state—and wondering where the heck all the years went? Wasn’t it just yesterday that life was all blood work and sonograms? How did it all fly by so fast? Did I do a good enough job? Is my job over? Are they prepared? How will I make until Parent’s Weekend or Thanksgiving without seeing my baby? I want a do-over!

So, here is the deal…

To the kindergarten parents: You will adjust. And you will be amazed at how your baby learns and grows and makes friends. They are ready, even if you are not. It will be fine. They will come home and tell you about their day at school and you will sit in wonder at this little person you created. And there will still be plenty of hours in the day to hover over them and teach them to navigate their new wonderful world. It’s going to be okay. I promise. (Still need to feel better? Read on for the college version.)

To the college freshman parents: You will adjust. True, when someone told me that a year ago as I sent my first IVF baby off to college in Virginia, I admit that I smiled and nodded politely but I secretly thought to myself “Nope, you’re an idiot.” (Look, those moments of “mom desperation” when your baby is moving 8 hours away can bring out the worst in us. Am I right?)

But really, somehow, life does go on without them home. I know it is unimaginable (and that you’re thinking I’m an idiot). It’s truly unthinkable. And the hole in your heart and life is so big, raw, and real right now. I get that completely. But as they start this next big phase on their own, you will marvel at their ability to juggle it all. Watch in pride as they begin “adulting” based on the foundation you gave them. The schoolwork, activities, eating, even the occasional laundry. All mostly on their own now. They will thrive in the place they feel they belong—which will become a second home to them in time as new friendships bloom.

But they will still need you and they will reach out for advice–and money– so look forward to those moments to come. And with your heart in your throat, keep on them (gently but firmly) about the parties and your expectations of them as they adjust to their newfound freedom. They’ll make the friends who will be their friends for life, and maybe even meet their soulmate. Look forward to seeing them at Parent’s Weekend. You will be amazed at how they’ve grown. And Thanksgiving will have a whole new meaning this year.

I’ve been in your shoes and I know you can do this. You are going to make it. Things are different and sad. Change is hard, but it can be good. And it will be good. Just maybe not today.

So, let them fly. (Really, let go of their foot.)

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With decades of miracles behind us, Long Island IVF parents have sent countless numbers of babies off to school (and some down the aisle!). Feel free to pics of your baby’s back-to-school pics.

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4 Reasons Why Infertiles Are Conflicted About the Solar Eclipse

By Tracey Minella

August 21st, 2017 at 11:19 am

credit: pixabay by hypnoart

There is an uncomfortableness– a conflict– in the hearts of the infertile community when it comes to the solar eclipse. Anything from a nagging fear to a raging paranoia. Why? What is driving these emotions? What is it about the solar eclipse that makes us uneasy?

1.      FOMO: Fear of Missing Out.

If anyone knows FOMO, it’s infertile people. Actually, it’s really the “Missing Out” part that we’re experts in. Regardless, FOMO is driving countless Americans to potentially risk permanent eye damage to view the eclipse.

We are used to missing out, but we don’t like it. So, the conflict over being part of the fun or feeling like an outsider and feeling deprived (yet again) is unsettling.

2.      “Just Relax”

What could go wrong? When we say we’re considering skipping the eclipse-viewing fun, many are met with “the look”. The one that says we’re over-reacting. Oh, it’s safe. Oh, those reports of counterfeit, defective, scratched glasses aren’t true.

Just relax…

Just as we hate to hear those two words with respect to our fertility, we don’t need that lame advice about our eyesight.

What are the odds your safety glasses are unsafe? Hmm. Seeing as we are the 1 in 8 suffering from infertility, do we feel particularly lucky? Yeah, I didn’t think so.

3.      Conflicting opinions are stressing us out.

Do we view it or not? What’s the best or safest way? The so-called safety eclipse glasses from Amazon or the homemade cereal box viewer from You Tube? Or the completely safe but totally boring TV viewing option? We infertiles have enough stressful decisions to filter through about our safety and health, so this eclipse thing doesn’t help.

It’s like us deciding on what’s the right infertility protocol. Clomid, IUI, or IVF? If IVF, what do we add to it? Donor egg? Gestational carrier? Add complementary holistic therapies like acupuncture? Then we have to decide which doctor to use. The wrong decision could have life-altering consequences. No wonder the magnitude of the eclipse-viewing decision makes us uncomfortable.

4.      Bonus stress for IVF parents:

You’re making decisions about your eyes and theirs.

It took so much to have that kid. You dreamed for years of doing cool stuff like this with them. And now it’s here. But you’re worried. Should you be out there with a cereal box viewer with the rest of the neighborhood or outside taking selfie’s donning so-called safety glasses? Or do you cave to your overprotective side and institute a full-blown lock down in the basement playroom for the duration?

The solar eclipse presents tough personal decisions. But regardless of whether you are a concerned parent or still on your infertility journey, or whether you choose to view it or not, here’s a tip to solar eclipse day –make it an outta sight party with moon pies and Sun chips.

How are you spending it?

 

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How to Support an Infertile Man on Father’s Day

By Tracey Minella

June 17th, 2017 at 9:06 am

 

image: tminella


Infertile “dads-in-waiting” are no different when it comes to being infertile on Father’s Day than infertile wannabe moms are on Mother’s Day.

They want a baby.

A daddy’s little girl around whose little finger to be proverbially wrapped. A “mini-me” son to hang out with.

But society doesn’t seem to see his pain… because he is quiet. Maybe even to his wife or partner.

Women are more likely to chat with their sisters or closest girlfriends about their infertility—they cry on each other’s shoulders and talk about treatment—but men just don’t really do that. They don’t open up like that. Women talk. But guys’ group conversations tend to gravitate towards sports or politics—not how they injected their wife with a two-inch needle last night or held her as she cried over another negative pregnancy test.

Many men think they have to be the strong one– because if she sees him crumble, she may unravel herself. How unfair is that? Yet that’s how it is for so many guys and it’s completely understandable, and yes, a bit sexist, how they are willing to take all the pain on their shoulders if it’d shelter her.

Imagine that pressure to be strong and not cry? Imagine the totally unfounded but very real guilt he may feel if the diagnosis is male factor infertility? Or the stress he’s under if they can’t afford infertility treatment because his insurance or his salary doesn’t cover it? Or how he’s keeping the secret and hoping the guys don’t find out and rag on him about specimen collection or awkwardly joke about how they can help get her pregnant.

And don’t think for a minute he’s not aware of the children of other men at the gathering. Especially on Father’s Day. Kids playing catch with their dads. Dads showing pictures from the dance recital.

If his relationship with his own father is a good one, it may help to spend some one-on-one together on Father’s Day focusing on his role as the son. Maybe reflect on what kind of father he plans to be when the time comes for him—what he loved about his dad’s parenting style and what he might do differently.

Most importantly, let him do what he wants. See or be with who he wants and be sure to run interference for him with difficult people when you can. If he wants to be around the nieces or nephews, indulge his wish even if you feel differently. Or be alone together—or let him do his own thing–if that’s what he needs for that day.

And don’t ask him about starting a family. Just don’t. Ever. Especially on Father’s Day.

There is no substitution for a baby on Father’s Day, but you can give him hope for one next year. And if you think he’d benefit from talking it out with a caring infertility specialist, Long Island IVF offers group and individual counseling. Some couples have found a special connection to others who understand what they are going through and have even remained friends after their infertility journeys have resolved.

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What are your plans for Father’s Day?

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Long Island IVF Symposium: How Acupuncture Can Improve IVF Success

By Tracey Minella

January 13th, 2017 at 11:54 pm


With so much riding on the outcome of an IVF cycle—emotionally and financially—savvy patients weigh all their options before jumping into such an important undertaking. There are several options that might be applicable, depending on a patient’s particular case, to “customize” a traditional IVF cycle, including ICSI, PGS/PGD, and other cutting edge medical procedures.

And now, there is something new—and old—that shows promise as well.

It’s an exclusive, yet very affordable, natural therapy that might help increase your chances of conceiving with IVF –even if you’ve had prior unsuccessful cycles. And this ancient, complementary therapy costs less than $200 per IVF cycle.

Long Island IVF… the practice that brought Long Island its first IVF baby, first Donor Egg baby and First baby from a cryopreserved embryo… is pleased to announce another major “first” on Long Island:

We are the first infertility practice with a Reproductive Endocrinologist who is also a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioner and a NYS certified medical acupuncturist.

Motivated by a desire to find complementary holistic approaches to enhance today’s best Western medical technologies, Long Island IVF co-founder and REI, Dr. David Kreiner, went back to school to study TCM after over 30 years of making babies.

Dr. Kreiner is now applying that acupuncture training in the IVF procedure room, both pre- and post-IVF transfer–exclusively to all interested Long Island IVF patients. IVF patients… especially those for whom Western medicine alone has not yet produced a baby…may benefit from adding this ancient therapy.

Long Island IVF’s Acupuncture Program is hosting a free symposium with a panel of some of the region’s experts on fertility acupuncture to discuss topics related to improving IVF success with acupuncture.

Start the New Year off right by educating yourself on this topic and the difference it may make in IVF outcomes.

Don’t miss this special program on Thursday, January 19, 2017 from 7:00-8:30 pm at our Melville office at 8 Corporate Center Drive, Melville, New York. The seminar is free, but seating is limited, so pre-registration is required. Preregister here.

Topics:

1- Western Medicine Approach to Infertility – Dr. David Kreiner, MD REI and NYS Certified Medical Acupuncturist, Long Island IVF

2- Improving IVF Success with Acupuncture – James Vitale, LAc,

3- Fertility Acupuncture to Improve Pregnancy Success with Western Fertility Treatments-Theresa Dragotto, Lac

4- Acupuncture, Herbs and Moxibustion to Increase IVF Success- Haoyue Lu, LAc

 

We look forward to seeing you there. Please contact Lindsay Montello, Patient Services, at 631-752-0606 or LMontello@liivf.com with any questions.

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Are you coming to the Acupuncture Symposium?

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Long Island IVF-WINNER: Best in Vitro Fertility Practice 2015 AND 2016

It is with humble yet excited hearts that we announce that Long Island IVF was voted the Best In Vitro Fertility Practice in the Best Of Long Island 2015 and 2016 contest…two years in a row!

The doctors, nurses, embryologists, and the rest of the Long Island IVF staff are so proud of this honor and so thankful to every one of you who took the time to vote. From the moms juggling LIIVF babies… to the dads coaching LIIVF teens…to the parents sending LIIVF adults off to college or down the aisles… to the LIIVF patients still on their journeys to parenthood who are confident in the care they’re receiving…we thank you all.

We love what we’ve gotten to do every day more than 28 years…build families. If you are having trouble conceiving, please call us. Many of our nurses and staff were also our patients, so we really do understand what you’re going through. And we’d like to help. 631-752-0606.

 

 

 

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