CALL US AT: (877) 838.BABY


Archive for the ‘Chinese New Year traditions’ tag

Will You Conceive in the Chinese Year of the Sheep, Um, Goat?

By Tracey Minella

February 19th, 2015 at 8:40 pm

credit: Feelart/ free digitalphotos.net

You don’t have to be Chinese to appreciate the richness of that culture’s traditions and the mystique of the Chinese methods of enhancing fertility.

 

The Chinese zodiac consists of a cycle of 12 years, with each year being named for a different animal, and supposedly bestowing upon those born in that year certain characteristics which are similar to the traits of the featured animal.

 

It’s the celebration of Chinese New Year. The 2014 Year of the Horse is ending. Each year, the passage of one animal year to the next is clear and routine. Except for the year that follows the year of the Horse. This year. Why?

 

An apparent ambiguity in the interpretation of the term “yang” has led to a difference of opinion among Chinese people on whether the year after the horse is the year of the ram, sheep, or goat. But the Chinese zodiac symbol recognizes it as the year of the Goat, so we’re going with that.

 

Children born in the Year of the Goat will be among other things “gentle, mild-mannered, shy, stable, sympathetic, amicable, and brimming with a strong sense of kindheartedness and justice”. * How wonderful!

 

But despite these great Goat qualities, many Chinese people try hard to avoid having children born during the year of the Goat. This is due in part to a popular Chinese folk saying ‘Only one out of ten people born in a year of the Goat finds happiness’ (十羊九不全). While this may seem to be a silly superstition to many…especially to infertile couples who usually wouldn’t care what day or year their baby was born…there is a real concern among many Chinese that Goat babies will be followers, not leaders, and may be destined for failed marriages, unhappy families, and bad luck.*

 

So, in the spirit of seeking all the good luck we can get when trying to conceive, I offer these four tips taken from Chinese New Year traditions.

 

Make Dumplings: On New Year’s Eve, the Chinese often celebrate by eating dumplings called “jiaozi”, which translates literally to “sleep together and have sons” according to http://www.theholidayspot.com. If you’re not “culinarily-challenged”, consider making these challenging dumplings.

 

Sweep Away the Bad Luck: Then, sweep out the house from top to bottom with a broom and give it a good cleaning. It symbolizes the sweeping away of all the bad luck of the past year so the good luck can enter. I do this religiously every single year. It feels authentic. You must try it.

 

Wear Red: Wear something red. It’s the color of good luck and symbolic of wealth. The Chinese elders often give young ones red envelopes with money inside on Chinese New Year. Maybe you can start a new tradition and break out a red envelope and get your relatives to contribute to the IVF fund.

 

Hide the Knives: Put away the knives…this is good advice for hormonal women anyway. Using knives and scissors at this time symbolizes the “cutting off” of the good luck and is an omen of bad luck in the year to come. Remember this one at mealtime.

 

You don’t have to be Chinese to embrace some of the Chinese culture

and have some fun with Chinese New Year traditions. Wear red. If you’re feeling adventurous, try making a batch of jiaozi from an internet recipe. Or just buy some wonton soup! Try your hand at chopsticks. Surround yourself with the richness of red and gold. Sweep out that old bad luck and embrace the New Year that awaits.

 

Basically, do whatever floats your goat.

 

* * **  * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * ** * * **

 

Do you celebrate Chinese New Year or follow any other cultural traditions with fertility-related traditions? Would the characteristics associated with children born in a particular year of the Chinese zodiac impact your family-building plans in any way?

 

 

* http://www.chinahighlights.com/travelguide/chinese-zodiac/goat.asp

Photo credit: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Other_Holidays_and_E_g321-Chinese_Lanterns_p140201.html

 

 

no comments

Embracing Chinese New Year While Infertile

By Tracey Minella

January 29th, 2014 at 1:44 pm

 

credit: feelart/freedigitalphotos.net

Chinese New Year is coming on Friday, when the year of the Horse will be ushered in. But you don’t have to be Chinese to appreciate their rich culture and traditions…especially the mystique of the Chinese methods of enhancing fertility.

The Chinese zodiac consists of a cycle of 12 years, with each year being named for a different animal, and supposedly bestowing upon those born in that year certain characteristics which are similar to the traits of the featured animal.

According to Chinese beliefs, children born in the Year of the Horse have these qualities: “Very hardworking and independent. Will work on and on until a job is finished. Very intelligent, ambitious and expect to succeed. Can cope with several projects at once. Easily fall in love.”* Incidentally, my first born IVF baby, born in the last year of the Horse completely fits that bill.

In the early years of my own fertility battle, I was working near Chinatown with Mai, a friendly Chinese girl. Whenever she spoke of her family’s traditions, I listened in fascination…especially whenever anything related to good luck or fertility came up. I didn’t matter that I was Italian and Irish. I was game for almost anything to get pregnant!

Here are four tips and suggestions (along with Mai’s wisdom) for all those trying to conceive at this enchanting time in the Chinese calendar.

  1. Eat Dumplings. On New Year’s Eve, the Chinese often celebrate by eating dumplings called “jiaozi”, which translates literally to “sleep together and have sons” according to http://www.theholidayspot.com. Mai was adept at making these challenging dumplings. I, was lame and ordered wonton soup instead. (No wonder it took me so long to conceive…)
  1. Sweep out the Old. Grab a broom and sweep out the house from top to bottom and give it a good cleaning. It symbolizes the sweeping away of all the bad luck of the past year so the good luck can enter. I do this religiously every single year. It feels empowering. So much easier than jiaozi, too. You must try it.
  1. Wear Red. On New Year’s Day, wear something red… the color of good luck and symbol of wealth. Mai’s older relatives used to give her and her siblings red envelopes with money inside on Chinese New Year. Maybe you can break out a red envelope, start a new tradition, and get your relatives to contribute to the IVF fund! (Wish I’d thought of that one sooner…)
  1. Avoid Knives. Put away the knives…this is good advice for hormonal women anyway. Using knives and scissors at this time symbolizes the “cutting off” of the good luck and is an omen of bad luck in the year to come. Remember this one at mealtime and go for finger foods or use chopsticks.

Remember, you don’t have to be Chinese to embrace some of the Chinese culture and have some fun. Wear red. If you’re feeling adventurous, try making a batch of jiaozi from an internet recipe. Or do the wonton soup thing.  Try your hand at chopsticks. Surround yourself with the richness of red and gold. Sweep out that old bad luck and embrace the New Year that awaits.

Allow hope to take root.

* * * * * * * * * * * ** ***

Do you celebrate Chinese New Year or follow any other cultural traditions with fertility-related traditions?

* http://bit.ly/1k7eRSq

Photo credit: Feelart http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=100140204

no comments


The Fertility Daily Blog by Long Island IVF
© Copyright 2010-2012