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Archive for the ‘David Kreiner’ tag

IVF: The Chances of Success

By Dr. David Kreiner

November 19th, 2010 at 10:44 am

What everyone wants to know when they decide to look into invitro ferilization (IVF) as a treatment option is "what is my chance for success?"  It’s a complicated question and the answer varies from  patient to patient. But let me try to break down a little bit for you.

In 2002 about 28% of cycles in the United States in which women underwent IVF and embryo transfer with their own eggs resulted in the live birth of at least one infant. This rate has been improving slowly but steadily over the years.  Patients should be aware, however, that some clinics define "success" as any positive pregnancy test or any pregnancy, even if miscarried or ectopic. These "successes" are irrelevant to patients desiring a baby. To put these figures into perspective, studies have shown that the rate of pregnancy in couples with proven fertility in the past is only about 20% per cycle. Therefore, although a figure of 28% may sound low, it is greater than the chance that a fertile couple will conceive in any given cycle.

Success varies with many factors. The age of the woman is the most important factor, when women are using their own eggs. Success rates decline as women age, and success rates drop off even more dramatically after about age 37. Part of this decline is due to a lower chance of getting pregnant from ART, and part is due to a higher risk of miscarriage with increasing age, especially over age 40. There is, however, no evidence that the risk of birth defects or chromosome abnormalities (such as Down’s syndrome) is any different with ART than with natural conception.

Success rates vary with the number of embryos transferred. However, transferring more embryos at one time not only increases the chance of success with that transfer, but will also increase the risk of a multiple pregnancy, which are much more complicated than a singleton pregnancy. The impact of the number of embryos that are transferred on success rates also varies with the age of the woman.

Pregnancy complications, such as premature birth and low birth weight, tend to be higher with ART pregnancies, primarily because of the much higher rate of multiple pregnancies. Nationally, in 2002-2003 about 30% of ART deliveries were twin deliveries, versus 1-2% of spontaneous pregnancies. The risk of pregnancy containing triplets or more was 6% in 2003.

As women get older, the likelihood of a successful response to ovarian stimulation and progression to egg retrieval decreases. These cycles in older women that have progressed to egg retrieval are also slightly less likely to reach transfer.  The percentage of cycles that progress from transfer to pregnancy significantly decreases as women get older.  As women get older, cycles that have progressed to pregnancy are less likely to result in a live birth because the risk for miscarriage is greater.  This age related decrease in success accelerates after age 35 and even more so after age 40.  Overall, 37% of cycles started in 2003 among women younger than 35 resulted in live births. This percentage decreased to 30% among women 35–37 years of age, 20% among women 38–40, 11% among women 41–42, and 4% among women older than 42.  The proportion of cycles that resulted in singleton live births is even lower for each age group.

The success rates vary in different programs in part because of quality, skill and experience but also based on the above factors of age, number of embryos transferred and patient population.  Patients may also differ by diagnosis and intrinsic fertility which may relate to the number of eggs a patient may be able to stimulate reflected by baseline FSH and antral follicle count as well as the genetics of their gametes.  These differences make it impossible to compare programs.

Another factor often overlooked when considering one’s odds of conceiving and having a healthy baby from an IVF procedure is the success with cryopreserved embryos.

Thus, a program which may have a lower success rate with a fresh transfer but much higher success with a frozen embryo transfer will result in a better chance of conceiving with only a single IVF stimulation and retrieval.  Success with frozen embryos transferred in a subsequent cycle also allows the program to transfer fewer embryos in the fresh cycle minimizing the risk of a riskier multiple pregnancy.  It may be more revealing to examine a program’s success with a combination of the fresh embryo transfer and frozen embryo transfers resulting from a single IVF stimulation and transfer.  For example, at East Coast Fertility, the combined number of fresh and frozen embryo transfers that resulted in pregnancies for women under 35.from January 1, 2002 to December 2008 was 396.  The number of retrievals during that time was 821.  The success rate combining the fresh and frozen pregnancies divided by the number of retrievals was 61%.  The high frozen embryo transfer pregnancy rate allowed us to transfer fewer embryos so that there were 0 triplets from fresh transfers during this time.

What can I do to increase my odds?

Patients often ask if there are any additional procedures we can do in the lab that may improve the odds of conception.  Assisted hatching is the oldest and most commonly added procedure aimed at improving an embryo’s ability to implant.  Embryos must break out or hatch from their shell that has enclosed them since fertilization prior to implanting into the uterine lining.  This can be performed mechanically, chemically and most recently by utilizing a laser microscopically aimed at the zona pellucidum, the shell surrounding the embryo.  Assisted hatching appears to benefit patients who are older than 38 years of age and those with thick zonae.

Recently a protein additive called “Embryo glue” was shown to improve implantation rates in some patients whose embryos were transferred in media containing “Embryo glue”.  Time will tell if the adhesive effect of this supplement is truly increasing success rates and warrants wide scale use in IVF programs.

Embryo co culture is the growth of developing embryos is the same Petri dish as another cell line.  Programs utilize either the woman’s endometrial cells obtained from a previous endometrial biopsy or granulosa cells obtained at the time of the egg retrieval from the same follicles aspirated as the eggs.  Growth factors produced by these endometrial and granulosa cell lines diffuse to the developing embryo and are thought to aid in the growth and development of the embryo.  It appears to help patients who have had previous IVF failures and poor embryo development.

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Join The Team At East Coast Fertility For A Special Event: The Path To Parenthood

By East Coast Fertility

November 12th, 2010 at 10:12 am

Please Join East Coast Fertility For a Special Evening of Education and Support!

We will be discussing:

What’s New in Infertility Treatment 

The Importance of Getting The Support You Need

How To Finance Infertility Treatment

How Holistic Medicine Can Support Your Fertility Treatment

Our panel of experts will include Dr. David Kreiner, Founder of East Coast Fertility,  Rosa Fernandez, B.S.N., RN, Nurse Coordinator, John Moschella,MS, ELD, Lab Director, Bina Benisch, R.N., M.S., Support Group Coordinator, Maryanne Abramowitz, Billing Administrator, and Mike Berkley Director of The Berkley Center for Reproductive Medicine at East Coast Fertility

The panel will be moderated by Pamela Madsen, The Founder of The American Fertility Association

When: November 18, 2010

Time:   6:30 to 8:00 pm

Where: East Coast Fertility
            Plainview Office
            245 Newtown Road
            Plainview, NY  11803
            Click here for directions

RSVP Please to Lindsay, lmontello@eastcoastfertility.com or call 516 939 2229

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Understanding Fibroids

By David Kreiner, Md

October 29th, 2010 at 2:11 am

Fertility is dependent upon so many things!

We must have healthy gametes (eggs and sperm) capable of fertilizing and implanting in a uterus with a normal endometrial lining unimpeded by any uterine or endometrial pathology. The sperm need be in sufficient number and capable of swimming up through a cervix which is not inflamed and provides a mucous medium that promotes sperm motility. The eggs need to ovulate and be picked up by normal healthy fimbriated ends (finger like projections) of the fallopian tubes. The tubes need to be covered with normal micro hairs called cilia that help transport the egg one third of the way down the tube where one of the sperm will fertilize it.

The united egg and sperm (the “conceptus”) then needs to undergo cell division, growth and development as it traverses the tube and makes its way to the uterine cavity by the embryo’s fifth day of life at which point it is a blastocyst. The blastocyst hatches out of its shell (“zona pellucidum”) and implants into the endometrial lining requiring adequate blood flow.

And you wonder why getting pregnant is so hard?

All too often patients, in some groups as many as 30% of women, are told that they have fibroids that may be contributing to their infertility. Fibroids or leiomyomata are non malignant smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. They can vary in number, size and location in the uterus including; the outside facing the pelvic cavity (subserosal), the inside facing the uterine cavity (submucosal) and in between inside the uterine wall (intramural). Fortunately, most fibroids have minimal or no effect on fertility and may be ignored.

The subserosal myoma will rarely cause fertility issues. If it were distorting the tubo- ovarian anatomy so that eggs could not get picked up by the fimbria then it can cause infertility. Otherwise, the subserosal fibroid does not cause problems conceiving.

Occasionally, an intramural myoma may obstruct adequate blood flow to the endometrial lining. The likelihood of this being significant increases with the number and size of the fibroids. The more space occupied by the fibroids, the greater the likelihood of intruding on blood vessels traveling to the endometrium. Diminished blood flow to the uterine lining can prevent implantation or increase the risk of miscarriage. Surgery may be recommended when it is feared that the number and size of fibroids is great enough to have such an impact.
However, it is the submucosal myoma, inside the uterine cavity, that can irritate the endometrium and have the greatest effect on the implanting embryo.

To determine if your fertility is being hindered by these growths you may have a hydrosonogram. A hydrosonogram is a procedure where your doctor or a radiologist injects water through your cervix while performing a transvaginal ultrasound of your uterus. On the ultrasound, the water shows up as black against a white endometrial border. A defect in the smooth edges of the uterine cavity caused by an endometrial polyp or fibroid may be easily seen.

Submucosal as well as intramural myomata can also cause abnormal vaginal bleeding and occasionally cramping. Intramural myomata will usually cause heavy but regular menses that can create fairly severe anemias. Submucosal myomata can cause bleeding throughout the cycle.

Though these submucosal fibroids are almost always benign they need to be removed to allow implantation. A submucosal myoma may be removed by hysteroscopy through cutting, chopping or vaporizing the tissue. A hysteroscopy is performed vaginally, while a patient is asleep under anesthesia. A scope is placed through the cervix into the uterus in order to look inside the uterine cavity. This procedure can be performed as an outpatient in an ambulatory or office based surgery unit. The risk of bleeding, infection or injury to the uterus or pelvic organs is small.

Resection of the submucosal myoma can be difficult especially when the fibroid is large and can sometimes take longer than is safe to be performed in a single procedure. It is not uncommon that when the fibroid is large, it will take multiple procedures in order to remove the fibroid in its entirety. It will be necessary to repeat the hydrosonogram after the fibroid resection to make sure the cavity is satisfactory for implantation.

The good news is, when no other causes of infertility are found, removal of a submucosal fibroid is often successful in allowing conception to occur naturally or at least with assisted reproduction.

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How Does Holistic Medicine Help Infertility Treatments? Come and Find Out!

By Pamela Madsen

October 12th, 2010 at 7:56 am

One of the things that I care about the most in health care – is taking care of the whole person.  When we struggle with our bodies – we are not simply one troublesome part – we are the sum of our parts. And bringing complementary medicine into our health care plan often  helps complete the package when it comes to a positive outcome .

The Berkley Center for Reproductive Wellness, the first complementary medicine Center in the U.S. to specialize in the care and treatment of those faced with fertility challenges, will open a brand new center in association with East Coast Fertility.  This will give patients on Long Island  access to an “East meets West” approach to fertility treatment.  There is current research which shows that by combining holistic medicine with traditional Western medical approaches, outcomes for many may be improved. 

ECF’s fertility clinics will continue to provide innovative assisted reproductive technologies, while The Berkley Center will focus on such holistic treatments as acupuncture, herbal medicine, massage, and clinical counseling.  Mike Berkley, the Director of Complementary Medicine Services, is the first acupuncturist in the U.S. to devote his practice solely to fertility care.

It is believed that combining these holistic treatments with advanced medical care can enhance the experience for many patients and help them achieve success.

The Center will be called The Berkley Center for Reproductive Wellness at East Coast Fertility, and will hold its grand opening presentation on October 13, 2010 at 7pm.  All are welcome to come and see the new facility and stay for a special presentation titled “Understanding How an East meets West Approach to Care Can Increase Your Odds!’.

Mike Berkley will discuss his thoughts about the benefits of holistic fertility care, and  Dr. David Kreiner, Medical Director and Founder of East Coast Fertility, will share his insights.

Reserve your seat at this special event by calling:  516.204.7149.

Dr. Kreiner is eager to offer patients holistic services to compliment their fertility treatments.  “Anything we can offer patients to enhance their experience or make them more comfortable during cycles can contribute to a successful outcome,” says Kreiner.  “It’s also about giving our patients options.  We want them to know they can come to ECF for comprehensive treatment, and holistic therapies are a part of that.”

Mike Berkley adds, “Many patients that use natural fertility techniques during IVF cycles have success.  It’s our job to offer them every possible resource to make their dreams of having a family a reality.”

It is past time that a patient on Long Island should have access to fertility treatments in association with holistic medicine. I am personally thrilled to be a part of the team that is bringing this to Long Island.  East Coast Fertility has always focused on giving patients high quality care, and offering them holistic options along with their state-of-the-art medical care will surely be a benefit to all.

I hope that you come to the seminar to learn more! I am looking forward to meeting you!

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A Donors Thanks Professor Robert Edwards

By Amy Demma, Jd

October 8th, 2010 at 8:09 am

A few days ago, Dr. Kreiner was inspired to write a blog based on a letter from a recipient mom of donor eggs. At my office, we love it when recipient parents write to us and while it is less frequent that a donor sends a note, when we do hear from donors, my staff and I are especially delighted. This week, I heard from both prospective parents and colleagues about the announcement of Dr. Robert Edwards receiving the Nobel Prize. And I also received the below e-mail from a three-time experienced (and very fertile) donor expressing her gratitude for IVF, as well.

“Dear Amy,

I have been lurking, as I think many anonymous egg donors do, on some of the e-community boards as they discuss the news of Dr. Robert Edwards and the Nobel Prize for perfecting the in-vitro process. What is being said by experienced egg donors on some of the boards would probably interest the people who contact your office needing a donor.

I would imagine that many patients are talking about what IVF offers them in terms of ways to manage their infertility; I wanted to share with you that donors are also grateful to Dr. Edwards. So many people in the media talk about donors who do this for the money. Well, I say, I am one of those women who sees it less as selling my eggs for cash and so much more as a really unique and special way that I can do some good.

As you and I have worked together, you know that it has been important for me to know a little bit about the couple I am cycling for. I need this to be more than a clinical process; I need to have some characteristics of the recipients that I can relate to while doing the shots and everything else. I am doing this from my heart and I need to have the recipients in my heart too.

Since my cycles have been successful, you know the joy and happiness that this news has brought me. This is why I and so many other donors are also thankful not only for Dr. Edwards and his hard work but also that the Nobel Committee has granted him this honor. Of course, the end result of your hard work with the parents and the reason that donors go through all that they do is so that a baby will be born. But if you think about it and trace it back from the delivery date to the match date, even though all of the people involved all wanted to create a baby, without Dr. Edwards, this form of charity could not be.

It seems that I am very fertile; I know that I want to be able to give that fertility to a couple who needs me to have their baby. I thank Dr. Edwards for giving me the opportunity to help someone who has not been able to have a family; there are so many more people who are better off for your in-vitro discovery. And I especially thank the Nobel Committee for giving this award and for saying to the world that IVF is deserving of this level of recognition.”

The letter quoted in the latest blog by Dr. Kreiner was about disclosure of donor conception. As I was reading the above e-mail, basically a thank-you note sent from a donor who appreciates that IVF made it possible for her to help others, I wondered if the recipients who worked with this donor would be more inclined to disclose about donor conception if they understood just how deeply motivated, from the heart, their donor was. I just may pass along the above.

 To learn more about Amy Demma, JD please visit:

www.lawofficesofamydemma.com

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Join Us For A Special Seminar on How Holistic Medicine Can Help You On Your Family Building Journey!

By East Coast Fertility

October 7th, 2010 at 8:58 am

The Berkley Center for Reproductive Wellness at East Coast Fertility invites
you to join us on October 13, 2010 at 7pm for our grand opening, light refreshments and a special presentation.

Featuring:

Dr. David Kreiner, Medical Director and Founder of East Coast Fertility

Mike Berkley – The first acupuncturist in the U.S. to devote his practice solely to the care of those faced with fertility challenges

With a welcome by: Pamela Madsen, Founder of The American Fertility Association and Patient Advocate for East Coast Fertility

East Coast Fertility provides state-of-the-art, high tech fertility care and
The Berkley Center for Reproductive Wellness provides holistic modalities including acupuncture, herbal medicine, and massage. With their proven track records, there is no doubt this team will improve your fertility outcomes,
helping to transform you from patient to parent.

Please join us for our grand opening presentation at our Plainview
office, 245 Newtown Road. After the presentation, we invite you to
take a brief tour of our new holistic center at 1074 Old Country Rd.
Come learn how we can make your dream of family a reality

To reserve your seat at this special presentation or to make an appointment please call (516) 204-7149

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Should Doctors Talk About Money?

By David Kreiner, MD

September 29th, 2010 at 7:14 am

One of the most distressing things I face in practice is when I get negative feedback from a referring physician.  Fortunately, it happens rarely but recently I was shocked about the complaint.  Apparently, his patient was offended that I discussed the finances involved with her treatment.  Her Ob Gyn agreed with her that it was inappropriate for me to discuss the cost of her options.  He told me, “I like you and think East Coast Fertility is an excellent program but I never talk about money directly to patients!  It’s not – I don’t know…seemly!”   “Money issues are discussed with the business office, the doctor only discusses the medicine”.

Perhaps it’s unfortunate that fertility doctors have to be so concerned about their patient’s pocket books unlike other fields of medicine that are usually covered by some measure of insurance.  But in the case of infertility with only a handful of states having some kind of mandated coverage – not everybody in the United States -  mandate or no mandate for infertility  -even has health insurance!  Many fertility patients are in some form or another “cash pay” patients.  One of the most popular places that patients visit when they go to any fertility clinic’s website is the finance page.  This is simply a fact of life.

For this reason I have developed many programs that will create access to fertility care for as many people as possible.  But here is the catch! One program does not fit all. These are simply not over sized tee shirts – each of these programs represent a certain course of  medical care – and each individual and couple needs the assistance of a caring doctor to help them choose the right program that will fit their own particular medical history.  In addition to the NY State DOH Grant Program and our own East Coast Fertility Grant Program, we have the Micro-IVF Program, The Money Back Guarantee Program,  and The Single Embryo Transfer Program.  The most effective treatment and the most efficient is always a full stimulation IVF. However, if someone has insurance coverage for IUI and meds but not IVF then they may prefer to do IUI. If they do not have coverage for IUI either then it may be more cost effective to do the Micro-IVF Program or minimal stimulation IVF at 2-3 x the success of IUI with less risk than gonadotropin IUI and less cost per pregnancy. Yet at a price of $3900 it may be more attractive than a full stimulated IVF. There is also The Single Embryo Transfer Program where we reward patients transferring one embryo at a time by making their cryo, embryo storage and unlimited frozen embryo transfers for free.  Others prefer the insurance of The Money Back Guarantee Program where patients are offered six IVF retrievals and frozen embryo transfers for a fixed fee that is refunded if they do not result in a live birth.   In order to inform patients about our success and programs that make IVF more available to them we offer free consultations.

In today’s world of fertility care – a good doctor will help a patient find not only the right treatment but how to access that care.  In order to do that – a doctor may have to do what some may think is unseemly – and that is to talk about money.

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Understanding How Holistic Medicine Can Support Your Journey to Family

By East Coast Fertility

September 28th, 2010 at 8:50 am

The Berkley Center for Reproductive Wellness at East Coast Fertility invites
you to join us on October 13, 2010 at 7pm for our grand opening, light refreshments and a special presentation.

Featuring:

Dr. David Kreiner, Medical Director and Founder of East Coast Fertility

Mike Berkley – The first acupuncturist in the U.S. to devote his practice solely to the care of those faced with fertility challenges

With a welcome by: Pamela Madsen, Founder of The American Fertility Association and Patient Advocate for East Coast Fertility

East Coast Fertility provides state-of-the-art, high tech fertility care and
The Berkley Center for Reproductive Wellness provides holistic modalities including acupuncture, herbal medicine, and massage. With their proven track records, there is no doubt this team will improve your fertility outcomes,
helping to transform you from patient to parent.

Please join us for our grand opening presentation at our Plainview
office, 245 Newtown Road. After the presentation, we invite you to
take a brief tour of our new holistic center at 1074 Old Country Rd.
Come learn how we can make your dream of family a reality

To reserve your seat at this special presentation or to make an appointment please call (516) 204-7149

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When Will You Be in Menopause? Do You Even Want to Know?

By Pamela Madsen

September 27th, 2010 at 8:22 am

As a peri-menopausal woman – the answer is yes. In fact I would like to know in advance that the period I am getting is my last one – so I can celebrate it. But the way things stand now – I won’t know that I am getting my last period until a year passes.  Kind of takes a lot of the ritual possibilities out of it. My girlfriend has a "Goddess Party" for her daughters when each of the got their first period – why shouldn’t we celebrate the last?

Now a new study released during 26th annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Rome  states that researchers  have developed an  accurate way to predict the age when women will hit the menopause using a simple blood test.

The average difference between the predicted age and the actual age that the women in their study reached the menopause was only a third of a year, and the maximum margin of error was between three and four years.

The  implications of this test for women and their doctors; if the results of the research are supported by larger studies,  means that women will be able to discover early on in their reproductive life what their expected age at menopause will be, so that they can plan when to start a family.

Knowing you fertility life span – is huge for women. That’s why Dr. David Kreiner at East Coast Fertility and I have been trying to get the word out about "Fertility Evaluations". Right now we can’t predict when a woman will hit menopause but technology does exist right now for women to get a reading on where they are now in their own biological clock.

In this new study – they are taking blood samples from 266 women, aged 20-49, who had been enrolled in the much larger Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study, Dr Ramezani Tehrani and her colleagues were able to measure the concentrations of a hormone that is produced by cells in women’s ovaries – anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH). AMH controls the development of follicles in the ovaries, from which oocytes (eggs) develop and it has been suggested that AMH could be used for measuring ovarian function. The researchers took two further blood samples at three yearly intervals, and they also collected information on the women’s socioeconomic background and reproductive history. In addition, the women had physical examinations every three years. The Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study is a prospective study that started in 1998 and is still continuing.

Dr Ramezani Tehrani, who is President of the Reproductive Endocrinology Department of the Endocrine Research Centre and a faculty member and Associate Professor of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran, said: "We developed a statistical model for estimating the age at menopause from a single measurement of AMH concentration in serum from blood samples. Using this model, we estimated mean average ages at menopause for women at different time points in their reproductive life span from varying levels of serum AMH concentration. We were able to show that there was a good level of agreement between ages at menopause estimated by our model and the actual age at menopause for a subgroup of 63 women who reached menopause during the study. The average difference between the predicted age at menopause using our model and the women’s actual age was only a third of a year and the maximum margin of error for our model was only three to four years.

"The results from our study could enable us to make a more realistic assessment of women’s reproductive status many years before they reach menopause. For example, if a 20-year-old woman has a concentration of serum AMH of 2.8 ng/ml [nanograms per millilitre], we estimate that she will become menopausal between 35-38 years old. To the best of our knowledge this is the first prediction of age at menopause that has resulted from a population-based cohort study. We believe that our estimates of ages at menopause based on AMH levels are of sufficient validity to guide medical practitioners in their day-to-day practice, so that they can help women with their family planning."

Dr Ramezani Tehrani was able to use the statistical model to identify AMH levels at different ages that would predict if women were likely to have an early menopause (before the age of 45). She found that, for instance, AMH levels of 4.1 ng/ml or less predicted early menopause in 20-year-olds, AMH levels of 3.3 ng/ml predicted it in 25-year-olds, and AMH levels of 2.4 ng/ml predicted it in 30-year-olds.

In contrast, AMH levels of at least 4.5 ng/ml at the age of 20, 3.8 ngl/ml at 25 and 2.9 ng/ml at 30 all predicted an age at menopause of over 50 years old. The researchers found that the average age at menopause for the women in their study was approximately 52.

Dr Ramezani Tehrani concluded: "Our findings indicate that AMH is capable of specifying a woman’s reproductive status more realistically than chronological age per se. Considering that this is a small study that has looked at women over a period of time, larger studies starting with women in their twenties and following them for several years are needed to validate the accuracy of serum AMH concentration for the prediction of menopause in young women."
Who knows – maybe one day we will be able to celebrate our last period – just as some people celebrate the first.

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East Coast Fertility to Open the First Holistic Fertility Center on Long Island

By East Coast Fertility

September 22nd, 2010 at 6:32 am

In association with The Berkley Center for Reproductive Wellness, the first complementary medicine Center in the U.S. to specialize in the care and treatment of those faced with fertility challenges, ECF will offer an “East meets West” approach to fertility treatment.  There is current research which shows that by combining holistic medicine with traditional Western medical approaches, outcomes for many may be improved.  The new Center is scheduled to open October 15th, 2010 in Plainview, New York.

ECF’s fertility clinics will continue to provide innovative assisted reproductive technologies, while The Berkley Center will focus on such holistic treatments as acupuncture, herbal medicine, massage, and clinical counseling.  Mike Berkley, the Director of Complementary Medicine Services, is the first acupuncturist in the U.S. to devote his practice solely to fertility care.  It is believed that combining these holistic treatments with advanced medical care can enhance the experience for many patients and help them achieve success.

 

The Center will be called The Berkley Center for Reproductive Wellness at East Coast Fertility, and will hold its grand opening presentation on October 13, 2010 at 7pm.  All are welcome to come and see the new facility and stay for a special presentation titled “Understanding How an East meets West Approach to Care Can Increase Your Odds!’.

Pamela Madsen, Founder of The American Fertility Association and Patient Advocate for East Coast Fertility will welcome you, your partner, and any friend you wish to bring. Mike Berkley will discuss his thoughts about the benefits of holistic fertility care, and  Dr. David Kreiner, Medical Director and Founder of East Coast Fertility, will share his insights.  

Reserve your seat at this special event by calling:  516.204.7149.

 
Dr. Kreiner is eager to offer patients holistic services to compliment their fertility treatments.  “Anything we can offer patients to enhance their experience or make them more comfortable during cycles can contribute to a successful outcome,” says Kreiner.  “It’s also about giving our patients options.  We want them to know they can come to ECF for comprehensive treatment, and holistic therapies are a part of that.”

Mike Berkley adds, “Many patients that use natural fertility techniques during IVF cycles have success.  It’s our job to offer them every possible resource to make their dreams of having a family a reality.”

East Coast Fertility has always focused on giving patients high quality care, and offering them holistic options along with their state-of-the-art medical care will surely be a benefit to all.

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