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Archive for the ‘Egg Donation’ tag

Donor Egg Recipient Seminar at Long Island IVF

By Tracey Minella

October 6th, 2015 at 12:11 pm

Do you think you might need an egg donor in order to build your family…but have a lot of questions about the process? Then you won’t want to miss this exciting event!

On Tuesday, October 13, 2015, at 7:00 pm, Long Island IVF will host a free event that could potentially change the course of your family-building journey. Everything you could ever need to know about egg donation will be covered. It should last about 2 and a half hours.

There are many reasons women ultimately choose to use donor eggs to build their families. Women whose eggs have been compromised by advanced age, cancer treatment, poor general quality, or other factors, have many ways to build a family through the donor egg and donor embryo programs at Long Island IVF. For many of these women, a healthy egg is their only obstacle to pregnancy. Gay men wanting biological children also need donor eggs.

Admittedly, conceiving with donor eggs or embryos is rarely the first choice, but often is an acceptable alternative after weighing many personal physical, emotional, psychological, and financial considerations. Decades of happy moms agree that using donor eggs was the best decision they ever made. In fact, you can ask one yourself at the seminar as one of our successful recipient moms will be on hand to share her experience!

It’s okay if you may not be ready to act on all the information you’ll receive. You won’t be pressured in any way. We’re just here to offer information… and emotional support. So why not come out and just listen to our team discuss the many different egg and embryo donation options?  Victoria Loveland, RN & Donor Egg Nursing Coordinator, Aviva Zigelman, LCSW & Donor Egg Program Director, Steven Brenner, MD, and other key members of our Donor Egg team will all be there to answer your questions, privately if you prefer.

You’ll be pleasantly surprised when we tell you about how affordable and stream-lined our programs can be, especially our embryo donation program. And how competitive the success rates can be, as well.

Long Island IVF offers several different egg donation options, including Sole Recipient Fresh Egg Donation, Shared Recipient Fresh Egg Donation, Frozen Egg Donation, and Frozen Embryo Donation cycles. Each option offers its own unique benefits, costs, and other considerations. We have young, healthy, pre-screened egg donors representing multiple ethnicities ready to help you build your family.

Take that first step, even if you’re hesitant. We look forward to seeing you and answering your questions about the exciting option of egg donation. Light refreshments will be served. Bring a friend.

Please RSVP to Debra Mathys at dmathys@longislandivf.com and say you’ll be there, but walk-ins are always welcome. There is no cost to attend.

Location: Long Island IVF 8 Corporate Center Drive, Suite 101, Melville, NY

Date: Tuesday October 13, 2015

Time: 7:00 pm

 

LONG ISLAND IVF: WINNER “BEST IN VITRO FERTILITY PRACTICE” in the Long Island Press’s “Best of Long Island 2015″ contest. We are humbled and excited by the honor! Can we help you build your family as well?

 

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Will you be there? If you’d like to attend but can’t, please call anyway so we can make other arrangements.

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The Male Biologic Drive to Parent

By David Kreiner MD

July 7th, 2015 at 3:01 pm

Photo credit: Valentina, proud wife and mom of Devin and Danny

Fatherhood comes in many different varieties that as a reproductive endocrinologist specializing in family building I see on a regular basis.  Whether the man is involved in a traditional heterosexual relationship or is attempting to build a family with his male partner or by himself, man… like woman… feels a biologic drive to parent.  As such, although adoption is a wonderful way to create a family, surrogacy and egg donation is appealing to male-only prospective parents because it affords them the opportunity to have a biological connection to their baby.

 

There are two types of surrogates: traditional and gestational.  A traditional surrogate supplies her own eggs and carries the baby to term.  Gestational carriers do not supply their own eggs and therefore a separate egg donor is utilized.  Unlike donated sperm, donated eggs require the in vitro fertilization (“IVF”) process involving hormonal stimulation of the female egg donor, monitoring during the 2 weeks of stimulation, and transvaginal egg retrieval which is performed under anesthesia.  Typically, the intended male father supplies the sperm and the fertilized eggs or embryos are placed into the uterus of the gestational surrogate.  Surrogates carry the pregnancy to term then surrender the baby and their parental rights to the father or male couple.  The process involves the use of assisted reproduction attorneys, and/or a donor/surrogacy agency. The entire process including IVF with egg donation, surrogacy, and obstetrical care has a cost that can be insurmountable for many men desiring to start a family, estimated to cost between $125-150,000.

 

There have been a few ways some men have successfully cut this expense.  First of all, the fee agencies charge to supply the donated eggs and the surrogates ranges from $10,000-$40,000 independent of the fee the reproductive attorney charges or the cost of psychological screening.  Some IVF programs will supply these services at a much lower cost.  In addition, these IVF programs have relationships with lesbian partners who may be interested in becoming surrogates after they have completed their own families.  Also, some income-based grants exist for male couples in need of surrogates.

 

Whatever your situation, Long Island IVF has the history, the means, the skills, and the desire to assist you in your family building journey.  We can assist you in finding the best agencies/donors/surrogates, reproductive attorneys and counselors to insure that you have the greatest chance of achieving your goal for the family of your dreams.

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How important is it to you to have a biological child and what is the greatest obstacle to you’re facing/faced in achieving that dream?

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The Fertility Awareness Opportunities Angelina Jolie Missed

By Tracey Minella

March 27th, 2015 at 11:57 am

 

 

credit: Paul Sherman/ wpclipart


Actress, director, humanitarian, ambassador, mom of twins, adoptive mom, wife of Brad Pitt. And she’s gorgeous.

What’s not to hate?

Oh, I’m just sort of  kidding. No, really. But despite all the good she does, there will always be haters. People who want her money, her talent, her babies, or her man. Jealousy can do that.

I don’t necessarily admire many celebrities… and that’s fine, because their only job is to entertain me, not impress me. But I am impressed with Angelina Jolie. She’s charitable with her time and money and seems pretty grounded for a megastar. And she uses her celebrity for good.

It’s been only two years since Jolie made headlines for undergoing a preventative double mastectomy after testing positive for the BRCA gene mutation… a mutation that significantly increases the lifetime risk of getting breast cancer. At that time, she was open about her decision and used her celebrity to increase breast cancer awareness.

Now Angelina revealed that she took those preventative measures to the next level. This time, she had both of her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed in the hope of avoiding ovarian cancer…another deadly cancer linked to the same gene mutation. Jolie lost her mom to ovarian cancer and said in a recent New York Times Op Ed piece that she doesn’t want her children to experience the same loss. Her openness is raising awareness of ovarian cancer.

But there is another untold story here, too…a fertility awareness story…and it needs to be heard.

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock, you know Jolie has six children. She adopted three children internationally and gave birth to a singleton and a pair of twins. Practically eliminating her risk of getting ovarian cancer is not the only result of her surgery.

The media is reporting that she can no longer have biological children. And Jolie acknowledged how hard her decision would be for a woman who has not completed her family-building. Perhaps because of the size of her family, this point seemed lost on the general public. But it’s not lost on you, is it? This surgery is a big deal. And before others who may not be done with their family-building journeys emulate Jolie and follow her path, some crucial missing information needs to be shared.

In fact, there are three opportunities here to increase fertility awareness and educate the public about advances in the field of reproductive technologies, namely PGD, Egg donation, and Egg-freezing.

First, there’s pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (“PGD”). PGD enables couples who are concerned about passing a life-threatening genetic disease on to their children to have their embryos pre-screened for gene mutations. This screening can only be done in conjunction with an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure, where eggs are retrieved and fertilized in a lab and the resulting embryos can be tested. Then, only those embryos that did not test positive for the mutated gene would be transferred into the uterus…virtually eliminating the chance of passing on that hereditary disease. BRCA is one of the many genes that can be screened through PGD. Long Island IVF offers PGD.

Second, there’s egg donation. If a woman has her ovaries and tubes removed, she cannot thereafter have a biological child…one created using her own eggs… however she may still experience childbirth. If she still has a healthy uterus, it may be possible for her, through IVF, to use eggs from an egg donor and the sperm of her partner or a donor, and have the resulting embryos transferred into her uterus where a pregnancy can implant and grow to term. Long Island IVF’s Donor Egg Program brought Long Island its First donor egg baby decades ago.

Finally, there’s the latest breakthrough in women’s fertility preservation technology: egg freezing. Egg-freezing offers an exception to the egg donor statement above. If… prior to removing her ovaries… a woman undergoes IVF for the purpose of either freezing her retrieved eggs (or freezing the embryos resulting from the fertilization of her retrieved eggs), then instead of needing donor eggs, she would be able to later have her own frozen eggs (or embryos) thawed and transferred into her uterus in the hope of becoming pregnant with her own biological child. Or if her uterus was unsuitable or absent, she could still have a biological child by having someone else carry a pregnancy for her. (Note: Surrogacy and gestational carrier laws vary from state to state.) Long Island IVF has an Egg Freezing Program.

These three fertility awareness opportunities, when coupled with Jolie’s breast cancer and ovarian cancer awareness, will further empower women everywhere to make better medical choices and take charge of their fertility and general health.

Shame on the haters. It’s wonderful that Jolie is open about her health in a way that raises awareness for others. She is a just a mom. A selfless mom who just wants to be there to see her children and future grandchildren grow up.

Is there something wrong with being proactive after tests show you carry a gene that could one day take your life, like it took your mother’s? Are the haters just jealous of her? Is she a hero?

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What do you think? What would you do?

 

 

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Long Island IVF Celebrates National Infertility Awareness Week (NIAW) 2015

By Tracey Minella

March 11th, 2015 at 7:19 pm

NIAW is April 19-25 this year and Long Island IVF has several fun and educational events planned. Egg Donation, Fertile Yoga, Stress reduction techniques, Acupuncture and more! All events are FREE…and you don’t have to be a patient to attend. It’s our part in the movement to increase Infertility Awareness.

Here’s what’s going on all week long:

Tuesday 4/21: Donor Egg Recipient Program Night:

Thinking about using an egg donor to build your family? Then we’ve got the night for you. Learn everything you ever wanted need to know about the Donor Egg process. Learn why some women can benefit from donor eggs, how egg donors are thoroughly screened, how the process works, the competitive success rates of our program, and so much more. Meet the Donor Egg Team and hear a testimonial from one of our many successful and happy moms.

When you’re ready to move forward with egg donation, we have pre-screened egg donors of many ethnicities just waiting to help you! Come see what it’s all about. Light refreshments.

 

Wednesday 4/22: Fertile Yoga Night:

Yoga with a Baby Goal!

Created for both newbies and yoga devotes, this is your chance to participate in a yoga session specifically geared to potentially enhance your fertility. Bring your mat or a towel (and yoga pants or gym wear) and experience meditation, breathing and stretching designed to reduce stress, lessen muscle tension and increase blood flow to the pelvis.

You’ll be guided by Lisa Pineda, of Yoga For Fertility, an instructor experienced in yoga for fertility who will leave you relaxed and wanting more. Light refreshments.

 

Thursday 4/23: Alternative Medicine & Holistic Approaches to Fertility Enhancement Night:

Stress reduction is the name of the game tonight!

This interactive evening will highlight Mind-Body and holistic medicine practices including meditation techniques, breath work, Reiki, massage therapy and a live demonstration of fertility-focused acupuncture. Learn how fertility-focused alternative medicine options  may complement traditional medical fertility protocols.

LIIVF’s own Dr. David Kreiner will discuss acupuncture and Bina Benisch, MS RN and other affiliated local practitioners will lead the other discussions/demos. Additionally, Rachel Liberatore, LMT, from Nu Touch Therapy will be providing free chair massages. And Jim Vitale, licensed acupuncturist and owner of Suffolk County Acupuncture will fascinate you with a live fertility acupuncture demonstration!

Don’t miss this chance to learn how to help yourself reduce stress and improve your own fertility. Light refreshments.

You’ll leave all these events feeling more empowered and relaxed, knowing ways you can optimize your chances of conceiving. Take back some control over your fertility.

 

Please join us from 7:00- 9:00 each evening at:

Long Island IVF

8 Corporate Center Drive, Suite 101

Melville, NY

 

All events are FREE, but pre-registration is required. Events will fill up quickly. Attendance is limited. If you’ve been trying to conceive without success, please RSVP immediately to reserve your spot by contacting our Patient Services Coordinator, Lindsay Montello at 631-386-5509 or lmontello@liivf.com. You do not have to be a Long Island IVF patient to attend. Please feel free to bring your partner or a friend. Come to any or all of these great events.

We’re looking forward to seeing you!

 

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Which of these events do you find interesting? What other kinds of events would you like to see us host?

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Long Island IVF Hosts Free Donor Egg Recipient Seminar

By Tracey Minella

October 9th, 2014 at 10:47 am

 

On October 21, 2014, Long Island IVF is hosting free event that could potentially change the course of your family-building journey. The topic is egg donation.

There are many reasons women ultimately choose to use donor eggs to build their families. Women whose eggs have been compromised by advanced age, cancer treatment, poor general quality, or other factors, have many ways to build a family through the donor egg and donor embryo programs at Long Island IVF. For many of these women, a healthy egg is their only obstacle to pregnancy.

Admittedly, conceiving with donor eggs or embryos is rarely the first choice, but often is chosen after weighing many personal physical, emotional, psychological, and financial considerations. Decades of happy moms would surely agree that using donor eggs was the best decision they ever made. In fact, you can ask one yourself at the seminar as one or two often stop by to share their experience!

You may or may not yet be ready to act on the information you’ll hear. But it’s never too early to become informed about your options… and knowledge is power, right? So why not come out and just listen to our team discuss the many different egg and embryo donation options?  Victoria Loveland, RN & Donor Egg Nursing Coordinator, Aviva Zigelman, LCSW & Donor Egg Program Director, and Steven Brenner, MD will all be there to answer your questions, privately if you prefer.

You’ll be pleasantly surprised when we tell you about how affordable and stream-lined our programs can be, especially our embryo donation program. And how competitive the success rates can be, as well.

Long Island IVF offers several different egg donation options, including Sole Recipient Fresh Egg Donation, Shared Recipient Fresh Egg Donation, Frozen Egg Donation, and Frozen Embryo Donation cycles. Each option offers its own unique benefits, costs, and other considerations. We have young, healthy, pre-screened egg donors representing multiple ethnicities ready to help you build your family.

Take that first step, even if you’re hesitant. We look forward to seeing you and answering your questions about the exciting option of egg donation. Light refreshments will be served. Bring a friend. Please RSVP to Debra Mathys at dmathys@longislandivf.com and say you’ll be there, but walk-ins are always welcome.

Location: Long Island IVF 8 Corporate Center Drive, Suite 101, Melville, NY

Date: October 21, 2014

Time: 7:00 pm

 

LONG ISLAND IVF was nominated BEST IN VITRO FERTILITY PRACTICE in the Long Island Press’s “Best of Long Island 2015″ contest. If you’d like to vote to help us win, you can vote once per day from now through Dec 15 here: http://bestof.longislandpress.com/voting-open/

 

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Will we be seeing you there?

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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

By Tracey Minella

October 3rd, 2014 at 6:01 pm

 

 

image: wpcliptart.com


Those desperate to have a baby may feel that nothing is more devastating than suffering from infertility. But if anything can trump infertility on the list of unfair hands dealt, it would most certainly be cancer.

So, in the spirit of raising breast cancer awareness this month, there are two important messages to share.

First, is to echo the bandwagon message about staying current with preventative measures like vigilant, routine breast self-exams between equally-vigilant annual exams at the gynecologist’s office. Also keep current with your annual mammogram. If you are still walking around with that tattered mammogram prescription in your bag, pick up the phone today and schedule that appointment. Go on, now.

This is particularly true for infertility patients who have understandably had enough of daily paper gowns and stirrups, and mistakenly assume that the constant medical “activity” down there takes the place of a GYN exam. The stirrups at the RE’s office are not the same as those at the GYN’s office. Staying current with your pap, mammo, and other GYN matters is especially important when trying to conceive. The last thing you want is to find yourself finally pregnant and then facing what might have been a preventable GYN issue.

The second message is spread awareness of fertility preservation to those facing a cancer diagnosis. Men and women, and teens, too. Fertility preservation through egg/sperm/or embryo freezing… when done prior to certain cancer treatments that may impair future fertility… is an important but often over-looked part of the cancer patient’s experience.

Understandably, newly-diagnosed cancer patients (breast or otherwise) are grappling with so much and are focused on saving their lives. When the patient is only a teen, the last thing worried parents may think of is the child’s future fertility. But fertility preservation must be considered early in the treatment plan.

Here’s how you can help others. If your friends or family are diagnosed with cancer during fertile years (including young teens), gently and quickly remind them to ask their doctor if the cancer treatment being recommended will affect or destroy their fertility and, if so, whether fertility preservation prior to cancer treatment is an option.  (Yes, it may be uncomfortable treading in such a personal area, but they will thank you when they can think clearly.) Fertility preservation can usually be done very quickly and the cancer treatment may be able to accommodate it. That way, when the cancer battle is won, the survivor will have more options when they’re ready to move forward with any family-building plans.

Fertility preservation offers a great window of opportunity for many cancer patients, but it sadly is not open indefinitely. Sharing this information may be the difference between a cancer survivor being able to have his or her own genetic offspring one day…or not.

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Did you know that fertility preservation was an option for cancer patients?

LONG ISLAND IVF was nominated BEST IN VITRO FERTILITY PRACTICE in the Long Island Press’s “Best of Long Island 2015″ contest. If you’d like to vote to help us win, you can vote once per day from now through Dec 15 in the Health and Wellness category, here: http://bestof.longislandpress.com/voting-open/

 

Photo credit: public domain image provided courtesy of wpclipart.com

http://www.wpclipart.com/medical/breast_cancer_awareness/breast_cancer_ribbon_black_bg.png.html

 

 

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Infertility and The Greatest Gift

By Tracey Minella

April 12th, 2014 at 7:02 am

 

credit: artur84/freedigitalphotos.net


Ever wish you could make a real difference in someone’s life? A life-altering difference?  Well, you can, and you just may improve your own life in the process.

Egg donation is a gift you can give to a friend, family member, or stranger who desperately wants to conceive, but for any number of reasons, is unable to do so with her own eggs. She needs the eggs of a young, healthy, generous woman. Possibly you.

Donor egg recipients are often women who have struggled with infertility for years. Many have exhausted all other medical options to conceive using their own eggs or may have suffered the pain of repeated miscarriage along their journey. Sadly, some women battle cancer only to find that chemotherapy and/or radiation robbed them of the ability to use their own eggs to start a family afterwards.  

Egg donors are special, empathetic people.

Although they are financially compensated in the sum of $8,000, most women donate their eggs simply because they want to help someone else.

Some donors have had children and know how much motherhood means. Others may be students who aren’t ready to have their own families just yet, but want to help someone else do so. Most healthy, young women under the age of 31 can be candidates.

Long Island IVF gave Long Island its first donor egg baby. For more than two decades our Donor Egg Program has been helping donor egg recipients find the right egg donor and build their families.

If you’re interested in giving someone the ultimate gift…the chance to become a mother…and want to learn more about becoming an egg donor, including details regarding compensation for participation in the program, please contact the Donor Egg Coordinator, Vicky Loveland, RN, at (631) 752-0606 and view our website at http://www.longislandivf.com/egg_donor.cfm

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Are you, or do you know anyone who would be, interested in this opportunity? If so, please call or forward this information to others.

If you have donated… or received… eggs would you share your experience?           

 

Photo credit: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=100169597 artur84

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Is Your Biological Clock Running Out?

By David Kreiner, MD

January 10th, 2014 at 10:35 pm

 

image courtesy of photo stock/freedigital photos.net

Tears start to course down the cheeks of my patient, her immediate response to the message I just conveyed to her. Minutes before, with great angst anticipating the depressing effect my words will have on her, I proceeded to explain how her FSH was slightly elevated and her antral follicle count was a disappointing 3-6 follicles. I was careful to say that though this is a screen that correlates with a woman’s fertility, sometimes a woman may be more fertile than suspected based on the hormone tests and ovarian ultrasound. I also said that even when the tests accurately show diminishing ovarian reserve (follicle number), we are often successful in achieving a pregnancy and obtaining a baby through in vitro fertilization especially when age is not a significant factor.

These encounters I have with patients are more frequent than they should be. Unfortunately, many women delay seeking help in their efforts to conceive until their age has become significant both because they have fewer healthy genetically normal eggs and because their ability to respond to fertility drugs with numerous mature eggs is depressed. Women often do not realize that fertility drops as they age starting in their 20s but at an increasing rate in their 30s and to a point that may often be barely treatable in their 40s.

A common reason women delay seeking help is the trend in society to have children at an older age. In the 1960’s it was much less common that women would go to college and seek a career as is typical of women today. The delayed childbearing increases the exposure of women to more sexual partners and a consequent increased risk of developing pelvic inflammatory disease with resulting fallopian tube adhesions.

When patients have endometriosis, delaying pregnancy allows the endometriosis to develop further and cause damage to a woman’s ovaries and fallopian tubes. They are more likely to develop diminished ovarian reserve at a younger age due to the destruction of normal ovarian tissue by the endometriosis.

Even more important is that aging results in natural depletion of the number of follicles and eggs with an increase in the percentage of these residual eggs that are unhealthy and/or genetically abnormal.

Diminished ovarian reserve is associated with decreased inhibin levels which decreases the negative feedback on the pituitary gland. FSH produced by the pituitary is elevated in response to the diminished ovarian reserve and inhibin levels unless a woman has a cyst producing high estradiol levels which also lowers FSH. This is why we assess estradiol levels at the same time as FSH. Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH) can be tested throughout a woman’s menstrual cycle and levels correlate with ovarian reserve. Early follicular ultrasound can be performed to evaluate a woman’s antral follicle count. The antral follicle count also correlates with ovarian reserve.

By screening women annually with hormone tests and ultrasounds a physician may assess whether a woman is at high risk of developing diminished ovarian reserve in the subsequent year. Alerting a woman to her individual fertility status would allow women to adjust their family planning to fit their individual needs.

Aggressive fertility therapy may be the best option when it appears that one is running out of time. Ovulation induction with intrauterine insemination, MicroIVF and IVF are all considerations that speed up the process and allow a patient to take advantage of her residual fertility.

With fertility screening of day 3 estradiol and FSH, AMH and early follicular ultrasound antral follicle counts, the biological clock may still be ticking but at least one may keep an eye on it and know what time it is and act accordingly.

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Did you realize that aging is not the only factor in the biological clock race? Did you know that certain conditions, like endometriosis, can play a part, too?

 

Photo credit: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=10049499

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 31: When Are You Too Old to be a Mother?

By David Kreiner MD

November 24th, 2013 at 9:44 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Thirty-One: When Are You Too Old to be a Mother? You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=143

When Are You Too Old to be a Mother?

 

Over the years, there have been reports of women as old as in their 70′s having babies as a result of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) performed using donated eggs from a young fertile donor.  Immediately after these reports appear, I am bombarded with questions and criticisms about how wrong it is that we (somehow I am included as part of the responsible party as an IVF practitioner) allow women to have children beyond that which is not just natural but also reasonable. Those of us in IVF have had many experiences with making the news as this medical technology pushes to the edges of what society views as acceptable.

 

We are often put in the position of making decisions with our patients that have even larger implications to society than the individual patient.  I do my best to look at each patient and each situation as unique and treat them accordingly.  Regarding the age of a prospective egg recipient however we are dependent on the patient’s honestly reporting such to us.  Unfortunately, there are circumstances where patients have misled their doctors and in the case of one 70 year old mother, she had reported to the clinic that she was in fact 53.

 

Even so, it is the responsibility of the IVF provider to ensure that a woman is healthy and capable of bearing the pregnancy, giving birth and being a mother.  There is not an absolute age cutoff at which point a woman is universally unfit to undergo IVF and become pregnant.

 

My personal oldest woman I helped achieve a pregnancy was a 53 year old who delivered at age 54.  She had a normal stress test, EKG and was cleared by an internist, perinatologist and psychologist.

 

Some point out that beyond a certain age, it is unnatural to become a mother and that it puts the family at risk that she may not be around to help raise the child or that perhaps the woman lacks the energy and stamina to raise the child properly.  I personally struggle to separate my own feelings about the proper age to have a child which may be inappropriate for others who have a different perspective.  My responsibility as the physician is to the health of my patients, the well-being of the child and for the good of society.

 

Many women in their 50′s have the health and energy to carry a pregnancy and bear a child with no more risk than many women 10-20 years younger.  That being said, what about the risk that the mother may not be around to raise the child to maturity?   There is no question that a young healthy couple with sufficient financial support and emotional maturity is ideal to raise a family.  But, happy, successful families can take on many different faces.  Single parent families exist, survive and often thrive.  One can never be certain that the condition of the couple at the time of conception will continue through the child’s birth or for that matter until the child has reached maturity.  In addition, at least 50% of couples in the U.S. become divorced.  One can argue that couples at risk of divorce should not get pregnant.

 

I apologize that I cannot offer an answer to this question, when are you too old to be a mother.  For me personally, it is more a question of health …for the mother and baby… which needs to be evaluated individually for each case utilizing testing and experts to make the best assessment.  Otherwise, I feel it is an individual’s right to choose as long as society is unaffected or supports the individual in those cases where the pregnancy has a significant impact beyond the immediate family.

 

 

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about what fertility doctors might consider when questioning if an older woman may be able to conceive and carry a pregnancy?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 31: When Are You Too Old to be a Mother?

By David Kreiner, MD

September 24th, 2013 at 11:08 am

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Thirty-One: When Are You Too Old to be a Mother? You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=143

When Are You Too Old to be a Mother?

Over the years, there have been reports of women as old as in their 70′s having babies as a result of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) performed using donated eggs from a young fertile donor.  Immediately after these reports appear, I am bombarded with questions and criticisms about how wrong it is that we (somehow I am included as part of the responsible party as an IVF practitioner) allow women to have children beyond that which is not just natural but also reasonable. Those of us in IVF have had many experiences with making the news as this medical technology pushes to the edges of what society views as acceptable.

We are often put in the position of making decisions with our patients that have even larger implications to society than the individual patient.  I do my best to look at each patient and each situation as unique and treat them accordingly.  Regarding the age of a prospective egg recipient however we are dependent on the patient’s honestly reporting such to us.  Unfortunately, there are circumstances where patients have misled their doctors and in the case of one 70 year old mother, she had reported to the clinic that she was in fact 53.

Even so, it is the responsibility of the IVF provider to ensure that a woman is healthy and capable of bearing the pregnancy, giving birth and being a mother.  There is not an absolute age cutoff at which point a woman is universally unfit to undergo IVF and become pregnant.

My personal oldest woman I helped achieve a pregnancy was a 53 year old who delivered at age 54.  She had a normal stress test, EKG and was cleared by an internist, perinatologist and psychologist.

Some point out that beyond a certain age, it is unnatural to become a mother and that it puts the family at risk that she may not be around to help raise the child or that perhaps the woman lacks the energy and stamina to raise the child properly.  I personally struggle to separate my own feelings about the proper age to have a child which may be inappropriate for others who have a different perspective.  My responsibility as the physician is to the health of my patients, the well-being of the child and for the good of society.

Many women in their 50′s have the health and energy to carry a pregnancy and bear a child with no more risk than many women 10-20 years younger.  That being said, what about the risk that the mother may not be around to raise the child to maturity?   There is no question that a young healthy couple with sufficient financial support and emotional maturity is ideal to raise a family.  But, happy, successful families can take on many different faces.  Single parent families exist, survive and often thrive.  One can never be certain that the condition of the couple at the time of conception will continue through the child’s birth or for that matter until the child has reached maturity.  In addition, at least 50% of couples in the U.S. become divorced.  One can argue that couples at risk of divorce should not get pregnant.

I apologize that I cannot offer an answer to this question, when are you too old to be a mother.  For me personally, it is more a question of health …for the mother and baby… which needs to be evaluated individually for each case utilizing testing and experts to make the best assessment.  Otherwise, I feel it is an individual’s right to choose as long as society is unaffected or supports the individual in those cases where the pregnancy has a significant impact beyond the immediate family.

 

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