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Archive for the ‘embryo co-culture’ tag

Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 20: Co-Culture of Embryos

By David Kreiner, MD

June 24th, 2013 at 9:34 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter twenty: Co-culture of Embryos. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=114

Co-Culture of Embryos

Co-Culture is a procedure whereby “helper” cells are grown along with the developing embryo.  The most popular cell lines include endometrial cells (from the endometrium or uterine lining) and cumulus cells from a woman’s ovaries.  Both cell lines are derived from patients.  Endometrial cells are more difficult to obtain and process, while cumulus cells are routinely removed along with the oocytes during the IVF retrieval.

Cumulus cells play an important role on the maturation and development of oocytes.  They produce hyaluronan which is normally involved in cell adhesion, growth and development in the body and is found in the uterus during implantation.

Co-culture of cumulus cells provides an opportunity to detoxify the embryo’s culture medium that the embryos are grown in and produce growth factors important for cell development.

Performing co-culture of embryos has improved implantation and pregnancy rates as presented by us at the national meeting of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine in 2007.

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 3: What Are My Odds?

By David Kreiner MD

February 26th, 2013 at 4:59 pm

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Three: What Are My Odds? You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=24

 

What are my odds?

 

This chapter is dedicated to informing patients regarding the potential for success with fertility therapy.  Success, in particular with IVF has been increasing significantly over the years as physicians and embryologists became more experienced.   The tools we use are more accurate and effective today and the protocols, media and laboratory conditions are all far superior to that which was standard not so many years ago.

 

This improved efficiency of the process has allowed physicians to transfer fewer embryos thereby avoiding the higher risk multiple pregnancies that IVF was known for in the 1990’s.  Still pressure exists to transfer multiple embryos to minimize expenses for the patient and maximize success rates for the IVF programs.  I have instituted a single embryo transfer incentive (SET) program at Long Island IVF eliminating the cost of cryopreservation and storage for a year for patients transferring a single embryo.  These patients are also offered three frozen embryo transfers within a year of their retrieval for the cost of one in an effort to eliminate the financial motivation some patients express to put “all their eggs in one basket”.  Experience tells us that the take home baby rate for patients transferring a single embryo at the fresh transfer is equal to that for patients transferring multiple embryos when including the frozen embryo transfers. For information on the SET program, go to: http://bit.ly/WpzCvv

 

Since the merger of East Coast Fertility and Long Island IVF, we have seen clinical IVF pregnancy rates at 66% (35/53) for women <35, 60% (18/30) for women 35-37, 54.1% (20/37) for women 38-40 and 8/28 (28.6%) for women 41-42 from Oct 1- Dec 31, 2011.  MicroIVF has been running better than 40% for women <35.

 

Different factors are discussed that can affect pregnancy rates at different programs.  The use of Embryo Glue and co-culture at Long Island IVF are discussed as laboratory adjunctive treatments that appear to improve our success rates.

 

For the most recent success rates, speak to your Long Island IVF physician or visit our website at http://bit.ly/XYZrSC

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Please share your thoughts about this podcast or ask any questions of Dr. Kreiner here.

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 20: Co-culture of Embryos

By David Kreiner MD

August 2nd, 2012 at 1:23 pm

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Twenty: Co-culture of Embryos. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.eastcoastfertility.com/?p=114

 Co-culture of Embryos

Co-culture is a procedure whereby “helper” cells are grown along with the developing embryo.  The most popular cell lines include endometrial cells (from the endometrium or uterine lining) and cumulus cells from a woman’s ovaries.  Both cell lines are derived from patients.  Endometrial cells are more difficult to obtain and process, while cumulus cells are routinely removed along with the oocytes during the IVF retrieval. 

Cumulus cells play an important role on the maturation and development of oocytes.  They produce hyaluronan which is normally involved in cell adhesion, growth and development in the body and is found in the uterus during implantation. 

Co-culture of cumulus cells provides an opportunity to detoxify the embryo’s culture medium that the embryos are grown in and produce growth factors important for cell development. 

Performing co-culture of embryos has improved implantation and pregnancy rates as presented by us at the national meeting of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine in 2007. 

* * * * * * **  * * * *

Was this helpful in answering your questions about co-culture of embryos?

Are you aware that Long Island IVF is giving away a free basic Micro-IVF cycle, valued at $3,900.00? Check out the contest here: http://bit.ly/LHbmQR

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions.

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