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Archive for the ‘Fertility’ tag

Goodbye Pride Month 2018 and Looking Ahead to 2019

By Tracey Minella

July 13th, 2018 at 2:11 pm

Long Island IVF booth at Pride on the Beach

And just like that, we flipped the calendar to July and closed the door on Pride Month, 2018. Why does July 1st feel like December 26th or the day after your birthday? Why is it so hard to take the advice of that popular proverb: “Don’t cry because it’s over; smile because it happened.”?

Let’s examine how we celebrated Pride Month and what pride means to us.

Dictionary.com defines “pride” as “a feeling or deep pleasure or satisfaction derived from one’s own achievements or the achievements of those with whom one is closely associated…”

Long Island IVF is both proud of its partnership with The LGBT Network and proud of what we accomplished together throughout June and throughout the year. Specifically, we were proud to be a major sponsor of Long Island’s Pride on the Beach again and to have partnered with The LGBT Network for another “Building Families in the LGBT Community” educational seminar. Our hats are off to The LGBT Network for a month of diverse Pride activities and an amazing weekend of Pride on the Beach.

As a fertility practice that’s been building families in the LGBT community for decades, we have our own Pride experience each June. We feel immense pride reuniting with those families every year—first at Pridefest and now Pride on the Beach. We are proud to have built families that, because of biological and/or sexual orientation-based obstacles, would not otherwise exist. And nothing feels better than seeing these happy, loving families and hugging these patients at Pride on the Beach who are often moved to tears with gratitude for us helping them become parents. It’s such a feel-good moment that it makes us tear-up, too!

How do you show your pride and what does pride mean to you?

When we aren’t reuniting with former patients and their babies or interacting with visitors to our booth each year, we enjoy people-watching and observing the different ways participants experience Pride on the Beach and show their pride. Some seem tentative at what may be their first community outing. Some are just happy and free attendees—like they could be at any beach event. Still others are a bit louder about being proud—opting for maximum celebratory style. Regardless, the overwhelming sense of community is palpable.

How do you see the purpose of Pride on the Beach? Is it meant as a sacred, exclusive, annual experience of solidarity? Do you feel welcoming, unwelcoming, or indifferent towards non-community member attendees? Is pride about blending in with the heterosexual community or standing out and being noticed– or a bit of both?

What sentiments did you feel or witness during Pride Month? Was it thankfulness toward the older generation for battling for the rights enjoyed today? Was it a commitment to helping support the younger, upcoming generations as they navigate their feelings and search for safe ways to come out and live a full and open life? Was there worry or even fear about hard-won LGBT rights being threatened or even potentially reversed in the future due to recent political events?

Is Pride Month a time for the LGBT community to celebrate itself? Is it a time to come out? Is it a time of spreading LGBT awareness or encouraging acceptance? Is it a time for advocacy for LGBT rights? Is it all of that and even more?

And what happens now that Pride Month is over? Does life just go back to “normal” until next June? Should it? Are there other options?

While Pride Month is primarily a celebration– unlike National Infertility Awareness Week (“NIAW”) which is definitely not celebratory– the two nationally-recognized movements are similar in that they each have the spotlight for a relatively brief time before returning to a more “low-key” public focus for the rest of the year until the pink and blue or rainbow awareness ribbons re-emerge in 11 months.

In the infertility community, National Infertility Awareness Week (“NIAW”) is recognized in late April each year. It’s only a week—not a month—long and it is not a cause for celebration because, well, no one wants to be infertile. In fact, many sufferers keep it a secret. But Long Island IVF and support groups nationwide often host several events that week (and promote them weeks or months in advance to extend the awareness time period). The events support and educate the infertility community and raise public awareness and understanding of the physical, emotional, mental, and financial toll the disease of infertility takes on the infertile community.

The frustration over the brevity of the NIAW one-week spotlight in April –and the inspiration of the LGBT community’s National Coming Out Day in October– caused Long Island IVF to establish Coming Out Infertile Day (“COI”) several years ago. Celebrated the week before Thanksgiving each year, COI Day is a timely reminder halfway to NIAW that the winter holidays and New Year’s Day with their focus on family and children are particularly hard times for infertile, childless couples. We offer workshops to help infertile couples get through the holiday stress, reconnect emotionally with their partners, and/or come out about their infertility to friends and family if they want to but don’t know how to do it.

Maybe a halfway to Pride Month is in order in December?

NIAW is also used as a call-to-action to join in advocacy efforts to expand rights and access to infertility treatment for both heterosexual and homosexual couples.

As far as infertility advocacy goes, right now the big push in New York is to get the Fair Access to Fertility Treatment (“FAFTA”) bill passed and funded in the budget. The bill would provide insurance coverage for in vitro fertilization for infertile couples as well as provide fertility preservation treatment for cancer patients whose cancer treatment may negatively impact their fertility or render them infertile.

FAFTA has already passed the House. If you’d like to tell your Senator to support it, please click here to be taken to a simple email template where you merely input your contact info and an email letter to your senator asking him/her to support FAFTA will be auto-generated. It takes less than two minutes and may help everyone—LGBT and heterosexuals—get mandated IVF coverage.

Long Island IVF has been actively campaigning for the passage of FAFTA and reaching out to our elected officials. We strongly urge everyone to join us.

So, the question is asked again. What is Pride Month and what will you do until it rolls around again in 11 months? How will the answer to that question impact your life and that of the rest of the LGBT community? How to you envision Pride Month 2019? Imagine how much more pride you would feel next year if you did even one small thing to help raise awareness, acceptance, or advocacy efforts for the LGBT community– or even if you helped improve the life of just one community member in some small way.

As our partners at The LGBT Network say, “Pride doesn’t end in June”. Let’s continue it with Pride Night at Citi Field. Let’s continue it after that, too.

Let’s make pride unstoppable.

 

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The Potential Benefits of Fertility Acupuncture

By David Kreiner, MD

June 22nd, 2018 at 4:37 pm

 

 

A study published in May 2018 in JAMA and led by Professor Caroline Smith from Western Sydney University, Australia, compared the birth rate in women who received traditional acupuncture during their course of in-vitro fertilization (“IVF”) to those who received a sham acupuncture treatment.   The clinical trial followed over 800 women from 17 fertility centers across Australia and New Zealand as they had IVF treatment. The women were split into two groups, those receiving traditional Chinese acupuncture, and those receiving a sham treatment, where a non-invasive needle was placed on the skin away from known acupuncture points.

 

They received one session of acupuncture during the period of follicle stimulation, prior to retrieval, and two sessions on the day of the embryo transfer: before and after the transfer took place.

 

The study found a small difference in the number of live births between the groups, with 74 of 405 (18.5 percent) women receiving acupuncture going on to have a baby compared to 72 of 404 (17.8 percent) women receiving the sham treatment.

 

Acupuncture has been a popular choice for treatment of fertility for many women either as an adjunct to Western assisted reproduction or alone.  In the Australian study at 17 different centers patients underwent acupuncture treatment three times, two of which were on the day of transfer. We do not know how much patients needed to travel to their acupuncturist nor how much they needed to rush back and forth from acupuncturist to IVF center and back to acupuncturist office.  “Sham” acupuncture may be questioned as a valid control since the meridian pathways of Qi run throughout the body and though the acupuncturist may think they are choosing a point not associated with traditional acupuncture, it does not mean the “sham” point is totally ineffective.

Previous studies have shown that acupuncture limited to only the day of embryo transfer does not increase pregnancy rates unless performed on the site of the embryo transfer.  It is thought that the stress of rushing to and fro from acupuncture site to IVF site and back is counterproductive. Although one treatment during stimulation may have some benefit, studies showing treatments, especially twice a week prior to IVF give significantly higher pregnancy rates.

 

In study performed by Reproductive Medical Associates as reported in Fertility and Sterility September 2008 with follow up studies bearing the same findings, a significant increase in pregnancy rates was seen in blinded Randomized Control Trials of laser acupuncture on the day of embryo transfer.

 

It is important to note that in the laser acupuncture study, the Sham group provided a uniquely important control group. The laser acupuncture device was randomly preprogrammed per case to either fire (and provide laser Acupuncture) or to not fire and thus provide a true double-blind control group (laser sham). It was not possible for the patient or acupuncturist to know if the laser fired. No contact occurs with the patient in laser acupuncture so there is no acupressure effect or contact with meridians.

 

No differences in terms of patient demographics, cycle type, stimulation outcomes, embryo number and quality, day of embryo transfer, transferring physician, or acupuncturist were found between the study groups.  This is significant as there is no like comparison in the Australian review. Implantation rates were significantly improved with laser acupuncture. Sub analyses of patient age and embryo transfer day produced similar findings with laser acupuncture enhancing outcome rates.

 

My recommendation to my patient remains that most benefit may be achieved by a patient undergoing acupuncture by a trained reproductive acupuncturist two times a week for at least six weeks prior to IVF and pre- and post-embryo transfer on site.

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Our Pride at Long Island Pridefest

By Tracey Minella

June 13th, 2018 at 6:35 am

One of the best things about building LGBT families on Long Island and being a major sponsor of Long Island Pridefest each year is the interactions with past, current, and prospective LGBT patients. This year was no exception.

Throughout the day yesterday, the Long Island IVF booth was bursting with pride. Pride when past patients came up to us to show off the children we helped them to have. Pride when a current patient came up showing off her baby bump. But there was another kind of pride that we felt–pride for the future and the families yet to come. We were touched by so many stories, so here are a few we’d like to share.

One family was so excited to reunite with Dr. Brenner as both of their children were conceived with his help. It was touching to hear the father repeat several times “This was life-changing for us, we are so grateful.”

Got serendipity? It was a wonderful surprise that a nearby vendor couple were also prior patients who built their LGBT family through Long Island IVF. The father was actually moved to tears expressing his gratitude.

One lesbian couple, who were newlyweds, hadn’t really talked about having children yet but were noticeably excited to think about it and were surprised when we told them all the options available.

Another newly-married female couple with more of an age disparity was very interested in starting the process of having a family together because the younger partner had not yet experienced the parenting joy which the older partner with grown children has known.

A third newlywed couple—lots of newlyweds were out Sunday! — had already done a lot of homework on family-building options, but still had questions. They spoke in depth to Dr. Brenner and, since one of the women was a teacher, they were happy to learn we offer early hours to accommodate her work schedule.

And there were tons of other meaningful interactions that made us so proud to be able to help build families for the community.

Whether you were able to speak with us at Pridefest or not, we encourage any members of the LGBT community who are interested in building a family– now or maybe in the future—to come down to our free seminar on June 21st in our Melville office.

The seminar, “Building Families in the LGBT Community” is held in conjunction with our partners at The LGBT Network. Pre-registration is requested so click this link to reserve your spot.

Long Island IVF has always been a friend to the LGBT community and has been building families here on Long Island for 30 years. We hope to see you on the 21st!

 

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Celebrating Three Decades of LGBT Pride and IVF on Long Island

By Tracey Minella

June 1st, 2018 at 2:11 pm

What better way to kick off the long-awaited Long Island summer than with the spectacular three-day weekend known as Long Island Pridefest? Organized by our partner, The LGBT Network, this year marks the 28th anniversary of the event and the second year it will take place in beautiful Long Beach, New York. As a proud sponsor of Pridefest for many years, Long Island IVF is also celebrating an anniversary this summer – – our 30th year.

As the first successful IVF program on Long Island, Long Island IVF brought Long Island its first IVF baby, its first baby from a cryopreserved embryo, and its first donor egg baby. For decades, Long Island IVF has built families for Long Island’s LGBT community.

Looking back on the history of both Pridefest and IVF technology on Long Island, much has changed over the past three decades. And those changes are overwhelmingly for the better.

When the first IVF baby was born in England in 1978, the world collectively gasped at the idea of creating life outside of the womb in a “test tube”. When America’s first IVF baby was born shortly thereafter in 1981 through the ground-breaking work of Dr. Howard Jones of the Jones Institute in Virginia, the “sci-fi” label still hadn’t worn off the public’s mind.

In 1985, a young doctor accepted a fellowship position at the prestigious Jones Institute in the newly-emerging field of Reproductive Endocrinology/Infertility and IVF. In 1988, that young doctor – – Dr. David Kreiner – – co-founded Long Island IVF with Dr. Daniel Kenigsberg. Dr. Kenigsberg– who had trained at the prestigious National Institutes of Health and whose nationally-recognized, award-winning research at the time led the way to modern-day IVF stimulation protocol– left his position as Director of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at University Hospital at Stony Brook Medical School to partner with Dr. Kreiner.  Together they pioneered IVF right here on Long Island. The two doctors, along with other doctors, nurses, and staff are still together today building families on Long Island for both the heterosexual and LGBT communities.

Pridefest has also grown over its 28-year history. And while this year’s theme is “Brave. Strong. United.”, it’s really the embodiment of those same three attributes in past Pridefest participants that has brought the event to the size, scope and impact it enjoys today. How many people have “come out” in those years? How does the community support members of all ages – – from teens to the elderly through workshops, education, counseling, and programs? How have advocacy efforts over the decades resulted in gains in civil rights, marriage rights, and reproductive rights just to name a few advances? How many community members can now—in addition or as an alternative to adoption– have biologically-linked children due to rapid advancements in assisted reproductive technology?

The many fights for rights over the decades by the pioneers of the gay rights movement have resulted in greater visibility of, gradual de-sensitization to, and increased acceptance of the LGBT lifestyle. Not from all, but from many. From baby steps to big steps, the LGBT community’s “in-your-face” relentless pursuit of equality and acceptance has made a difference. But facing down potential threats to these gains requires continued vigilance and advocacy—as well as joyful noise. So, while she may have started it, today’s Pridefest is not your grandma’s Pridefest.

Last year’s Pridefest and its 30+ events, drew tens of thousands of people and this year’s event promises to be even better. From the Pride Carnival kick-off at 6 PM on Friday June 8 until the Pride Market Fair wraps up on Sunday night, the weekend is jam-packed with something for everyone including but not limited to:

  • A Taste of Long Beach- restaurant and bar specials
  • Pride Shabbat service
  • Junction kick-off party
  • Nature’s Bounty 5K Run
  • Family Fun Run
  • Pride Beach Party and Fashion Show
  • Pride Pet Parade
  • Pride Boat Parade
  • Pride Cabaret Night
  • Pride on the Tide Party
  • Pride Market Fair
  • Pride Mass
  • Pride Parade
  • Concert on the Beach
  • Memorial Paddle Out honoring Pulse Nightclub Massacre victims

 

Pridefest is a time for serious fun. “Fun” as evidenced by the laundry list of incredible activities packed into one long weekend on the beach. “Serious” because there is an important message of pride, inclusion, and unity underlying it all. It’s a Pride party with a purpose.

As a sponsor of Pridefest and as a partner to The LGBT Network year-round, Long Island IVF is committed to providing compassionate and inclusive care. We encourage all members of the LGBT community to come to our free seminar “Building Families in the LGBT Community” being held in conjunction with The LGBT Network on the evening of June 21st at our Melville office. Our doctors, nurses, staff and reproductive law attorney, Amy Demma, will address the many family-building options available to the LGBT community and will be happy to answer any of your questions. All are welcome. Pre-register here.

The Long Island IVF team loves seeing the parents and children of the LGBT families we’ve helped create each year at Pridefest so please stop by and say hello. We also look forward to meeting new friends and prospective parents, so come by our booth to connect with us and grab some freebies. We’ll be there on Sunday! Hope to see you then.

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Surviving Mother’s Day When Infertile

By Tracey Minella

May 12th, 2018 at 9:44 pm

image courtesy of witthaya phonsawat at freedigitalphotos.net

Surviving Mother’s Day when struggling with infertility is the pits. No way to sugarcoat it. Mother’s Day is the hardest day of the year for those longing to be mothers.

So, what are you going to do this year?

If you have a close relationship with your own mother and she is still living, she might be able to cheer you up a bit. But even she won’t be able to make it “all better” like she used to. It’s just not that simple. And if she’s gone, that’s a really black hole—it’s so hard to be both motherless and childless on Mother’s Day and living with the unsettled feeling of having no connection to a parent or a child.

Of course, being in the company of a mother or mother-in-law who pushes your “baby buttons” isn’t a picnic either.

And being a mother who has suffered a miscarriage, stillbirth, or other infant or child loss is an unspeakable pain only those strong women will ever understand. If you know one of them, resist the urge to avoid what feels awkward and mention her lost angel by name–it will help her in some small way to know her baby hasn’t been forgotten.

On the hardest day of the year, it’s important to do whatever you want and not to be guilted, shamed, or coerced to be in the company of people who will make the day even a drop harder on your hurting heart.

Whether you’re a mother through resolving your infertility journey, a bereaved mother, a mother-to-be, or a mother-in-waiting, you ARE a mother. The day is yours; mark the day as you see fit.

One nice idea might be to plant a tree or a garden dedicated to your child or future child. Something you could watch grow over the years. Something you could explain the significance of to any future children and use as a backdrop for those milestone pictures they grow.

Here’s a mind trick for the day, or for any day: If you are currently on an infertility journey, believe you will ultimately have a happy resolution – – not because it’s guaranteed, but because it’s very possible and positivity can only help.

This is tough advice and it isn’t meant for Mother’s Day but try not to let your sadness and frustration keep you from enjoying some moments of the present. Because the future is coming and regardless of how your journey ends, you can’t get this time back. And you may look back and have regrets on how your life was “on hold” for so long, wishing you only knew back then that it was eventually going to work out somehow. So, trust that the future will be bright and make the best of these times. Hopefully, you will be right. And hopefully, next Mother’s Day will be different.

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Happy National Nurses Week to Our Long Island IVF Nurses

By Tracey Minella

May 7th, 2018 at 7:39 am

image courtesy of imagerymajestic at freedigitalphotos.net

Oh, the nurses. As National Nurses Week begins, we should stop for a moment and ask ourselves: Where would we will be without our Long Island IVF nurses?

Our nurses do it all – – and then some. They are the liaison between you and your doctor and they are charged with keeping all the details of your treatment cycle on track. But then they go the extra mile because they know the importance of what you’re going through and want to help you get to the goal.

Our nurses understand you are more than a chart, more than a patient–you’re a person who wants to be a parent and you need their help to get there. Or you have a child, but need help to give them a sibling. Because some of our nurses were once Long Island IVF patients themselves, they really do understand the highs and lows of the infertility treatment experience. So, they have your back, they’re on your team. They’ll lend their shoulders, dry your tears, and celebrate your successes.

Long Island IVF nurses have a special calling for this mission. Playing a part big part in helping their patients’ dreams of becoming mothers and fathers come true is amazingly fulfilling work. They love what they do and it shows. Nothing makes them happier than seeing newly-pregnant patients return to their ObGyns with an ultrasound photo in hand…except when they come back to the office to show off their little miracles.

Is there a particular Long Island IVF nurse or nurse practitioner that comes to mind as you’re reading this? Are you smiling as you think of her? If so, consider a shout out to let her know she’s made a difference in your life. It would make her day.

Long Island IVF wishes all of our caring and compassionate nurses a wonderful National Nurses Week. We couldn’t do it without you—nor would we want to try.

 

 

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Flip the Script and Banish the Closets Beyond NIAW 2018

By Tracey Minella

May 4th, 2018 at 10:44 am

image: shutterstock

How do heterosexuals and LGBT members experience infertility? There are two different “scripts” for those suffering from infertility. One for heterosexual couples and the other for the LGBT community. Both can play out like horror movies for those unfortunate enough to be cast.

National Infertility Awareness Week (“NIAW”) was the brainchild of Resolve, The National Infertility Association. Each year the week– generally celebrated during the last week of April–has a different theme. The theme for 2018 was #FlipTheScript. As its name suggests, NIAW was created to recognize and support people suffering from infertility and to raise awareness of a disease that affects 1 in 8 couples.

In addition to raising awareness of infertility and supporting those suffering, NIAW is designed to mobilize forces to advocate for change and to get people talking—beyond just one week each year– so that the stigma associated with infertility can disappear and those suffering don’t need to add shame to the list of other emotions and fears that infertility already brings.

The International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ICMART) defines infertility as “a disease characterized by the failure to establish a clinical pregnancy after 12 months of regular, unprotected sexual intercourse or due to an impairment of a person’s capacity to reproduce either as an individual or with his/her partner,” (emphasis added), according to the Resolve website*. The latter part of the definition was added only after years of advocacy by the LGBT community and its allies to expand the definition so it would be relevant, beneficial, and inclusive of the LGBT community which sought medical coverage for infertility treatment.

So, if infertility is defined differently for LGBTs and heterosexuals, how is the NIAW experience similar or different for both groups?

When infertility statistics are cited, the phrase “1 in 8” is a likely reference to heterosexual couples. For the vast majority of the LGBT community—including all lesbians and all gay men– it would be “8 in 8”. That’s because they (and many transsexuals) cannot get pregnant or get someone pregnant without the use of assisted reproductive technologies like intrauterine inseminations (IUIs), in-vitro fertilization (IVF), donor sperm, donor eggs, and/or gestational carriers.

For heterosexuals, the painful infertility stigma they experience is often born from feelings of failure and inadequacy upon learning that one partner or the other (or both) has a medical condition, problem, or disease that makes them unable to achieve or maintain a pregnancy as a couple. Society expects a heterosexual couple to be able to produce a baby the “old-fashioned way” so when they can’t, they often feel shame.

Looking at it that way, LGBT couples should be free of the stigma. Society doesn’t yet place the same expectation on LGBT couples to reproduce. For most, their infertility is simply due to a need to obtain the missing biological piece – – eggs or sperm – – to create a baby within the LGBT union. Not the same shame here. Society recognizes that LGBT couples are infertile by biological necessity. So, for those LGBT couples not further burdened with a specific infertility-causing disease or condition (like male factor infertility or poor egg quality or uterine fibroids) or an unexplained infertility diagnosis, society doesn’t place the same expectation of procreation on the union or the same stigma of shame and failure.

In fact, sometimes the opposite is true. Some haters oppose the LGBT’s pursuit of biological parenthood. Instead of fighting a social stigma of shame like heterosexuals, the LGBT community fights ignorance, intolerance, and prejudice of those who fail to recognize that all people regardless of sexual orientation have the right to become parents.

Social stigmas drive guilt, shame, fear, anger, and frustration. If we truly want to “flip the script” as National Infertility Awareness Week’s theme encourages us to do in 2018, we need to acknowledge the words, emotions, and actions that have been written into our “scripts” to date and change them.

To the heterosexuals, society’s harsh script (including certain religious influences) reads that you have what it takes as a couple to make a baby. We expect you to procreate. You should be able to do this without help. What kind of a man can’t get his wife pregnant? What is your worth as a woman if you can’t be a mother? So, when you can’t get pregnant, the message is “What’s wrong with you? We don’t understand you or support you or sympathize with you.” Couples who can’t procreate often feel like failures and feel shame or guilt. So, they don’t speak. They keep their struggles secret and suffer in silence due to this stigma.

To the LGBT community, the horrible script is a different version of the cold shoulder. It sometimes reads, (including certain religious influences) that even though you have the legal right to marry, we don’t recognize your union as one meant for procreation or parenthood. Your union isn’t “natural” so you can’t and shouldn’t become biological parents. Kids need a mommy and a daddy. “What’s wrong with you? We don’t understand you, support you or sympathize with you.”  LGBT couples, accustomed to haters and frankly tired from fighting for the right to everything, just want what most people want–the same rights to have a biological child if they so choose.

To this, we say #FlipTheScript.

To this we say, banish the closets. The LGBT community didn’t come out of the closet to go back inside…and they’re not going to leave their suffering heterosexual friends in there alone.  They haven’t fought so many battles for so long just to stop now. They have the right to marry. They’ve changed the definition of infertility to include the LGBT community. And armed with a definition that includes all people, the LGBT community and its heterosexual friends will continue the fight for compassionate, quality, accessible, affordable healthcare and insurance coverage for the assisted reproductive technologies necessary to overcome this barrier to parenthood.

In order to banish closets in which infertile LGBT and heterosexuals hide, we all need to step up the advocacy efforts and show society we’re loud, we’re proud, we all have a right to be parents and we all have a right to affordably access the medical technology to get us there. That’s when acceptance may eventually happen and stigmas may end. That’s when the only thing hiding in closets will be those clothes you swear you’re going to fit in again someday.

If you are interested in LGBT family-building, Long Island IVF has decades of experience helping the community become parents.  Please contact us today for more information or to schedule an initial consultation.

We are proud to partner with the LGBT Network to provide information, education, support, and access to the most advanced traditional and holistic assisted reproductive technologies. All while understanding, respecting, and being sensitive to the unique needs of the LGBT community.

And we are excited to again be a major sponsor of Pridefest this June!

In addition to Pridefest festivities, Long Island IVF and the LGBT Network will be offering our popular Building Families in the LGBT Community seminar on Thursday June 21, 2018 from 6:00-8:00pm at the Long Island IVF Melville office. It’s a free, casual, and informative session that addresses everything you would ever need to know about how you can become a parent through assisted reproductive technologies. All are welcome. No need to be a patient. Just click the link above to preregister now.

This year, Long Island IVF is celebrating a milestone–our 30th anniversary. If you are ready for parenthood, we would love the opportunity to assist you with your own milestone. Please follow us on Facebook or Twitter for info on our upcoming free events.

 

* https://resolve.org/infertility-101/what-is-infertility/

 

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Goodbye Shame: Losing the Stigma of Infertility Workshop

By Tracey Minella

May 3rd, 2018 at 2:20 pm

Let’s talk about the stress, shame, and stigma of infertility. No, really, let’s talk about it.

When a couple cannot conceive without assisted reproductive technology, they often feel guilt and shame. Society sends a message that procreation should happen without assisted reproductive technology. And those who can’t get pregnant the old-fashioned way often feel like failures. Their shame often forces them to suffer in silence, hoping this month will be the month. Hoping no one will ever have to know they had a problem conceiving.

Overwhelmed, many infertile couples throw themselves into their treatment. They go through the hectic schedule of sonograms, lab work, and injections. They deal with the financial burdens, the insurance headaches, and the job stress. But they don’t realize that keeping the secret and the toll it places on their mind and body may be detrimental. And nobody needs another obstacle to conceiving.

The stigma of infertility is real. It is completely unwarranted, of course, but that doesn’t change the fact that it exists in society and it impacts countless infertile couples who are struggling on so many levels: physically, mentally, financially, emotionally, and socially.

Unburden yourself tonight. Long Island IVF is offering a free workshop hosted by our infertility specialist counselor Bina Benisch, MS, RN in our Melville office on “Losing the Stigma of Infertility”. All are welcome, no need to be a patient to attend. Preregister here.

Past attendees often say they were a bit hesitant to come in but were so happy they took the chance. There’s never any pressure to join the discussion.

Imagine being in a room with a small group of people who are struggling and feeling so much of what you are going through right now. The in-law pressures, juggling work and treatment, the endless baby showers, the jealousy and fear and frustration. Imagine being with others who also only have each other to confide in, but now having the chance to unload—the chance to process those emotions and unburden yourself with the help of a caring specialist. What an amazing opportunity for healing. In fact, many past attendees were so comfortable by the end of the session that they stayed connected and lasting friendships were formed.

Nobody understands. Nobody other than those who are walking in your stirrups and the skilled professionals who help you along the way.

Let’s heal tonight. Please join us for a transformative experience.

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Long Island IVF Nutrition for Fertility Workshop

By Tracey Minella

April 19th, 2018 at 8:11 am

 

Drive right past those golden arches and get yourself over to Long Island IVF for a fun, free event on “Nutrition for Fertility” on Tuesday, April 24 at 6:30 PM. Learn how nutrition impacts fertility and find out how your diet may be sabotaging your ability to conceive.

Register here for this nutrition event and several other National Infertility Awareness Week events on yoga, acupuncture, and losing the stigma of infertility. All #NIAW events are free and all are welcome–no need to be a patient to attend. But preregistration is required to claim your spot.

Infertility is hard and the stress understandably sends many toward comfort food. Unfortunately, many comfort foods aren’t healthy and a poor diet can negatively impact your fertility. In fact, some common diets may increase your likelihood of infertility by as much as 85%! So, put down that milkshake and greasy fries and learn about great-tasting, healthy-eating options that may work for– instead of against– your fertility.

Break the vicious cycle and get some control over your fertility back by learning how important good nutrition is in the infertility battle. There isn’t a lot we can control when getting pregnant requires assisted reproductive technologies like IVF or IUI, but we are in control of what and how we eat. So, let’s take advantage of it.

Why not come down to this fun and free nutrition workshop led by certified holistic health coach, Renée Barbis, and learn what to eat when you’re trying to conceive and how proper nutrition can help you maintain a healthy pregnancy and nourish your growing baby.

This event is the first in a series of four events celebrating National Infertility Awareness Week 2018 at Long Island IVF.

Register now to claim your spot for what will surely be a fun and informative evening. Bring your partner or a friend or come alone. All are welcome. Adults only. You will leave feeling inspired and empowered to enhance your own fertility through proper nutrition.

We hope to see you there!

 

 

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Safeguarding Frozen Embryos, Eggs, and Sperm at Long Island IVF

By admin

April 9th, 2018 at 3:27 pm

 

Liquid nitrogen cryogenic tank

At Long Island IVF, we understand from a clinical standpoint what you went through to create your frozen embryos. Several of us here are also IVF patients–some with our own embryos in the same freezers as yours. So, on a personal level, we really understand how worried you may have been after hearing about two recent and unprecedented storage tank incidents at fertility clinics in Ohio and California.

To point out that over the past 30 years nationwide, such tank malfunctions have been extremely rare does little to comfort those patients who were unfortunate enough to have suffered such heartbreaking losses. So, let me tell you about the measures that we employ at Long Island IVF to safeguard your frozen embryos.

Your frozen embryos (and frozen eggs and sperm) are guarded 24/7 by multi-level security systems designed to safeguard them from dangerous temperature fluctuations. Our cryopreservation tanks have double alarm systems which monitor both the temperature within the tanks as well as the level of liquid nitrogen (used as the coolant).

The alarm system is active 24/7 and if there is an issue not only sounds in the lab, but also sends alerts to our lab director or designated on-call lab personnel, so someone is always informed about the status of the cryogenic tanks. The alarm systems have both battery as well as generator back-up systems.

In addition to this high-tech, double alarm security system, each tank in our IVF Lab is also visually monitored by lab personnel (an embryologist or an andrologist) every day, including weekends. Finally, the cryopreservation tanks and their backup and monitoring systems, as well as the IVF Laboratory itself, undergo routine and rigorous inspections for third party accreditation organizations in accordance with industry standards.

If you are a patient and have any further questions or concerns, we encourage you to contact the office directly for more information.

 

 

 

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