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Archive for the ‘frozen embryo transfer’ tag

Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 29: Why the Wyden Bill Does Not Support Fertility Patients

By David Kreiner MD

November 3rd, 2013 at 11:20 am

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Twenty-Nine: Why the Wyden Bill Does Not Support Fertility Patients. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=138

Why “The Wyden Bill” Does Not Support Infertility Patients

 

IVF results subjected to government audit were mandated to be reported with the passage of the “Wyden bill”.   The intent of the CDC and national reproductive society (SART) was to assist infertility patients by informing them of the relative success of all IVF programs in the country. 

 

Unfortunately, what sometimes creates the best statistical results is not always in the best interest of the mother, child, family and society.  Now that prospective parents are comparing pregnancy rates between programs there is a competitive pressure on these programs to reports the best possible rates.   Sounds good…unfortunately it doesn’t always work out that way for the following reasons.

 

Patients with diminished ovarian reserve, who are older or for any number of reasons have a reduced chance for success, have a hard time convincing some programs to let them go for a retrieval.  In 2008, we reported our success, 15% with patients who stimulated with three or fewer follicles.  Sounds low and in fact many of these patients were turned away by other IVF programs in our area.  However, for those families created as a result of their IVF, these “miracle” babies are a treasure that they otherwise… if not for our program giving them their chance… would never have been born.

 

Another unfortunate circumstance of featuring live birth rate per transfer as the gold standard for comparison is that it pressures programs to transfer multiple embryos thereby increasing the number of high risk multiple pregnancies created.  This is not just a burden placed on the patient for their own medical and social reasons but these multiple pregnancies add additional financial costs that are covered by society by increasing costs of health insurance as well as the cost of raising an increased number of handicapped children.

 

William Petok, the Chair of the American Fertility Association’s Education Committee reported on the alternative Single-Embryo Transfer (SET) “Single Embryo Transfer:  Why Not Put All of Your Eggs in One Basket?”.  He stated in November 2008, that although multiple rather than single-embryo transfer for IVF is less expensive in the short run, the risk of costly complications is much greater.  Universal adaptation of SET cost patients an extra $100 million to achieve the same pregnancy rates as multiple transfers, but this approach would save a total of $1 billion in healthcare costs.

 

We have offered SET since 2006 with the incentive of free cryopreservation, storage for a year and now a three for one deal for the frozen embryo transfers within the year in an effort to drive patients to the safer SET alternative. 

 

If we are going to report pregnancy rates with IVF as is required by the Wyden Bill, let us put all programs on the same playing field by enforcing the number of embryos to be transferred and even promoting minimal stimulation IVF for good prognosis patients.  The Wyden Bill without the teeth to regulate such things as the number of embryos transferred and reporting success per embryo transfer does more harm than good.  Let us promote safer alternatives and report in terms of live birth rate per stimulation and retrieval, including frozen embryo transfers, so that there is a better understanding of the success of a cycle without increasing risks and costs from multiples.

 

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about the Wyden Bill, IVF success rates and reporting requirements, and SET?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 22: Cryopreservation of Embryos

By David Kreiner, MD

July 15th, 2013 at 11:09 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Twenty-Two: Cryopreservation of Embryos. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=119

 Cryopreservation of Embryos

 In 1985, my mentors, Drs. Howard W. Jones Jr and his wife Georgeanna Seegar Jones, the two pioneers of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) in the Western Hemisphere, proposed the potential benefits of cryopreserving embryos for future transfers.  They predicted that doing so would increase the overall success rate of IVF and make the procedure safer, more efficient and cost effective. 

One fresh IVF cycle might yield enough embryos so that in addition to performing a fresh embryo transfer in the same cycle as the stimulation and retrieval that additional embryos may be preserved for use in future cycles.  This helps to limit the exposure to certain risks confronted in a fresh cycle such as the use of injectable stimulation hormones, the egg retrieval and general anesthesia.  It also allows patients to minimize their risk for a multiple pregnancy since embryos can be divided for multiple transfers.

At Long Island IVF, we are realizing the Jones’ dream of safer, more efficient and cost- effective IVF, as well as increasing the overall success of IVF. 

Today, an estimated 25% of all assisted reproductive technology babies worldwide are now born after freezing.  Studies performed in Sweden revealed that babies born after being frozen had at least as good obstetric outcome and malformation rates as with fresh IVF.  Slow freezing of embryos has been utilized for 25 years and data concerning infant outcome appear reassuring relative to fresh IVF. 

I personally have pushed to promote the concept of removing the financial pressure to put all your eggs in one basket by eliminating the cost of cryopreservation and storage for those patients transferring a single embryo.  Furthermore, such a patient may go through three frozen embryo transfers to conceive for the price of one at our program.  We truly believe we are practicing the most successful, safe and cost effective IVF utilizing cryopreservation.

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about cryopreservation of embryos?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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