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Archive for the ‘Health’ tag

The Dream of Motherhood Never Dies

By Tracey Minella

December 15th, 2013 at 8:09 pm

 

image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici/freedigital photos.net


There are women who have babies with ease…they pick the month they’d like the baby to be born, conceive effortlessly, and often enjoy care-free pregnancies and deliveries. Others have unplanned pregnancies and sometimes complain or give up the baby. And some women choose to never have children at all.

And then there is us. The infertile ones.

We began our quest as innocent planners of big families and summertime babies. And as the journey wore on we somehow morphed into women who’d settle for just one healthy baby born on any day of the year. We altered the dream to our reality. And we prayed it would come true.

For many of us with access to quality reproductive medical care, the dream will come true. The statistics for IVF success are rapidly rising as technology improves daily. Single embryo transfers (SETs), already popular at Long Island IVF, are helping to reduce risky multiple pregnancies. And Early Embryo Viability Assessment (EEVA) Testing, which is part of a clinical trial at Long Island IVF, is helping embryologists choose the embryos most likely to result in a pregnancy.

But what about those who don’t have access for financial or other reasons? What about their dreams? If faced with no other options, these women resolve to live child-free. Many end their infertility journeys after having suffered devastating losses or repeated disappointments and are emotionally, physically, and financially exhausted. For most of them, living child-free may not really be a choice, but rather, the only option available.

I don’t think the dream of motherhood ever dies. Certainly not for women who wanted it badly enough to endure the sacrifices and demands of repeated IUIs and IVFs. The journey may end, but the longing remains. Even if the woman stops talking about it. Even if she says she’s okay with living child-free. That’s just self-preservation talking.

This week that theory was validated as a 64 year old woman gave birth after a 41 year infertility journey. She got married six years before the first IVF baby was even born. She tried IVF only once, in 1988, without success and thereafter gave up treatment…for 23 years. But the dream hadn’t died. She went back for another IVF procedure and is finally a mother at 64. Her daughter is named Durga, which means “invincible”. For the full story, clickhttp://bit.ly/INs6ua

This story is offered not to spark debate on how old is too old to become a mother, but as testament to the unwavering power of the dream of motherhood and the miracles capable from modern reproductive medical technology.

What may feel like the impossible dream today may be the invincible dream tomorrow. Dare to dream it.

* * * * * ** * ***

photo credit: David Castillo Dominici/free digital photos.net

 

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 32: Octomom

By David Kreiner MD

December 1st, 2013 at 8:26 am

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Thirty-Two: Octomom. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=146


A year ago, the Medical Board of California revoked the license of Dr. Michael Kamrava, finding he “did not exercise sound judgment” in transferring 12 embryos to Nadya Suleman, who already had six children at home. The ruling, while not surprising, was illuminating, and it’s worth reflecting on the five things we learned from Octomom:

 

1.      Know How to Say “No”: There is a point where physicians have to make a judgment call. Pregnancies with triplets – let alone eight infants – put the mother at high risk of serious medical complications and put unborn children at risk for developmental disabilities. Physicians need to rely on their professional expertise and experience to know when to turn down a patient request no matter how vehemently it is made.

 

2.      Beware the Patient with Tunnel Vision: Often when a patient comes to a fertility doctor, unsuccessful pregnancy attempts have made her anxious and determined. She might want to get pregnant regardless of the risks that pregnancy may present.

3.      Less is More: In 1999, 35 percent of all transfers involved four or more embryos. In 2009, only 10 percent had four or more. And those high-number transfers are generally reserved for patients with significant fertility challenges. In contrast, Octomom already underwent multiple successful IVF (in vitro fertilization) procedures and had given birth to six children when she had her 12-embryo transfer.

 

4.      Know When to Deviate: While Dr. Kamrava’s deviation from guidelines was an extreme departure, deviations do occur for specific reasons, such as repeated IVF failure, age-related infertility and poor egg quality. It is important to know when implanting several embryos is appropriate.

5.      “Reduce” Risk: Dr. Kamrava complained that Octomom refused to undergo “selective reduction,” which would have reduced the number of embryos she carried to term. Here, again, is an argument for fewer transfers. Had he transferred fewer embryos, Octomom would not have had to face such a difficult decision.

 

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about what could have been done differently to prevent the Octomom case? How much weight do you give your doctor’s recommendation on the number of embryos to transfer?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 31: When Are You Too Old to be a Mother?

By David Kreiner MD

November 24th, 2013 at 9:44 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Thirty-One: When Are You Too Old to be a Mother? You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=143

When Are You Too Old to be a Mother?

 

Over the years, there have been reports of women as old as in their 70′s having babies as a result of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) performed using donated eggs from a young fertile donor.  Immediately after these reports appear, I am bombarded with questions and criticisms about how wrong it is that we (somehow I am included as part of the responsible party as an IVF practitioner) allow women to have children beyond that which is not just natural but also reasonable. Those of us in IVF have had many experiences with making the news as this medical technology pushes to the edges of what society views as acceptable.

 

We are often put in the position of making decisions with our patients that have even larger implications to society than the individual patient.  I do my best to look at each patient and each situation as unique and treat them accordingly.  Regarding the age of a prospective egg recipient however we are dependent on the patient’s honestly reporting such to us.  Unfortunately, there are circumstances where patients have misled their doctors and in the case of one 70 year old mother, she had reported to the clinic that she was in fact 53.

 

Even so, it is the responsibility of the IVF provider to ensure that a woman is healthy and capable of bearing the pregnancy, giving birth and being a mother.  There is not an absolute age cutoff at which point a woman is universally unfit to undergo IVF and become pregnant.

 

My personal oldest woman I helped achieve a pregnancy was a 53 year old who delivered at age 54.  She had a normal stress test, EKG and was cleared by an internist, perinatologist and psychologist.

 

Some point out that beyond a certain age, it is unnatural to become a mother and that it puts the family at risk that she may not be around to help raise the child or that perhaps the woman lacks the energy and stamina to raise the child properly.  I personally struggle to separate my own feelings about the proper age to have a child which may be inappropriate for others who have a different perspective.  My responsibility as the physician is to the health of my patients, the well-being of the child and for the good of society.

 

Many women in their 50′s have the health and energy to carry a pregnancy and bear a child with no more risk than many women 10-20 years younger.  That being said, what about the risk that the mother may not be around to raise the child to maturity?   There is no question that a young healthy couple with sufficient financial support and emotional maturity is ideal to raise a family.  But, happy, successful families can take on many different faces.  Single parent families exist, survive and often thrive.  One can never be certain that the condition of the couple at the time of conception will continue through the child’s birth or for that matter until the child has reached maturity.  In addition, at least 50% of couples in the U.S. become divorced.  One can argue that couples at risk of divorce should not get pregnant.

 

I apologize that I cannot offer an answer to this question, when are you too old to be a mother.  For me personally, it is more a question of health …for the mother and baby… which needs to be evaluated individually for each case utilizing testing and experts to make the best assessment.  Otherwise, I feel it is an individual’s right to choose as long as society is unaffected or supports the individual in those cases where the pregnancy has a significant impact beyond the immediate family.

 

 

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about what fertility doctors might consider when questioning if an older woman may be able to conceive and carry a pregnancy?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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Long Island IVF Now Recruiting Patients for Exciting Research Study

By admin

November 14th, 2013 at 11:01 pm

 

 

The MultiCenter Registry with Eeva (MERGE) Research Study is currently recruiting patients at Long Island IVF.

Eeva: The Early Embryo Viability Assessment Test is a test to be used by IVF laboratories to analyze early embryo development and to aid in the selection of the best embryo for transfer. At the heart of Eeva is software that was designed to assess critical difference in early embryo growth and determine an embryo’s viability and the potential for further development.

The Eeva Test was developed based on landmark research conducted at Stanford University[1] which discovered that early embryo growth events can predict embryo development and reflect the underlying health of the embryo.

Auxogyn Inc. recently completed a multi-center clinical trial using Eeva with 54 patients and 758 embryos. The results from the trial supported that when embryologists used Eeva in conjunction with their traditional techniques they were able to correctly identify non-viable embryos 86% of the time vs. only 58% of the time without using Eeva[2].

The goal of the MERGE study is to record and evaluate the use of traditional embryo grading techniques combined with Eeva in the treatment of in vitro fertilization.

If you are interested in participating in this research, please contact Long Island IVF at 631-752-0606 or info@longislandivf.com and ask for the Auxogyn study coordinator for more information.

_______________________________________________________________________

1. Wong et al. in Nature Biotechnology, 2010.

2 Conaghan et al. Fertility & Sterility, May 2013.

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Infertility and ObamaCare

By David Kreiner MD

October 21st, 2013 at 7:07 pm

 

 

photo credit: David Wagner/publicdomainpictures.net

Have no fear ObamaCare is here!

For those of us hoping to increase accessibility to health care for the uninsured, the passage of ObamaCare…the administration’s own term for the Affordable Care Act… provides us with hope that this much sought after right to obtain health care for all Americans might soon become a reality.

Well, unfortunately, we are not quite there yet especially as it relates to fertility care. There still remains concern about the out-of-pocket expenses for fertility medications and treatments.

Apparently, on January 1, 2016, the federal government is withdrawing support for mandated fertility coverage in the six states where such coverage does exist… including in New York.  That day, Uncle Sam says “you’re on your own” to those mandated states.  It will be up to the states to foot the bill or else eliminate the mandated coverage.  I think we know how that will go.

On other fronts, we have more bad news.  Medications covered by the new state- supported exchanges require much higher co-pays.  Fertility medications are estimated by some to cost as much as $1,300 per covered cycle under these exchanges.   Considering the goal of ObamaCare was to make health care more accessible, I understand why the administration has stopped referring to the new law as the Affordable Care Act.

The exchanges can be purchased at different levels with increasing cost correlating with a lower percentage of out-of-pocket expense.  Those interested in fertility treatment (or for that matter anyone with a preexisting condition) should and presumably will purchase the better coverage, if able. If one can afford the coverage of the Gold plan, the 10% co-payment, and the enormous co-pay for the medications, then IVF will be a possible option.  Unfortunately, these costs may be prohibitive for many who otherwise, under the current insurance system, are financially able to afford IVF.

So you may ask what the ramifications of ObamaCare are to the infertile seeking treatment.   As it stands now, for most it will prove to be the Unaffordable Care Act which will prevent access to care which could otherwise allow them to build their family; a right that is denied them due to their infertile medical condition and ObamaCare.

 

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What impact, if any, do you think ObamaCare will have on your fertility insurance and care?

 

Photo credit: David Wagner/ http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=11517&picture=barack-obama-11

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Is Your Reproductive Endocrinologist or Fertility Practice On Top of Their Game?

By Tracey Minella

October 10th, 2013 at 7:22 pm

 

photo credit: jscreationzs/freedigitlaphotos.net

Did you research your reproductive endocrinologist’s background before your initial appointment or did you just trust the recommendation of a friend who had success with him? Has your investigation gone no further than a quick glance at those diplomas on the office wall?

Does it matter that your doctor graduated first in his class at Harvard Medical School in 1980 if he hasn’t kept abreast of the rapidly changing advances in the assisted reproductive technology (ART) field, or hasn’t surrounded himself with a team of top-rate embryologists? Or hasn’t conducted any research studies?

Certainly, education matters. But so does something else…continuing education.

Is your doctor on top of his or her game? Is he involved in ground-breaking research? Is she recognized as a leader in the field?

The biggest annual conference on Assisted Reproductive Technology is the Conjoint Meeting of the International Federation of Fertility Societies and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine…more simply referred to as the ASRM… and it kicks off in Boston this Saturday. Fertility doctors, embryologists, IVF nurses, and others working in the field come from all over the world to attend the 5 day conference to learn the latest, cutting edge developments in reproductive technology.

The information to be presented at the ASRM each year is chosen by the committee based on research studies and abstracts submitted by fertility professionals across the globe. Having an abstract chosen for presentation at the ASRM is a great honor to a fertility practice.

Although Long Island IVF always sends several doctors and key support staff, this year is extra special… 

This year, not only one… but two… abstracts from Long Island IVF have been accepted for presentation at the ASRM.

The first abstract is titled: “Minimal Stimulation (Micro-IVF) Achieves Similar Clinical Outcomes in Patients Under 35 years of age compared to those undergoing conventional controlled ovarian hyperstimulation.” For more information about the Long Island IVF Micro-IVF Program see http://bit.ly/12ZjvaD or speak to your Long Island IVF doctor.

The second abstract is titled:  “eSET vs DET: Its Clinical Effectiveness in the Real World”. This abstract compared the effectiveness of Single Embryo Transfers (SET) against that of Double Embryo Transfers (DET). For more information about the Long Island IVF Single Embryo Transfer Program, including the financial incentives offered to SET program patients, see http://bit.ly/WpzCvv or speak to your Long Island IVF doctor.

Through these two ground-breaking studies, Long Island IVF has addressed two important issues for today’s infertility patients… lowering the costs of treatment and minimizing the chance of potentially risky multiple pregnancies…all while maintaining competitive pregnancy success rates.

If you have any questions, including whether you might be a candidate for either of these well-established Long Island IVF programs, please contact your Long Island IVF doctor.

* * * * * * * * *

Have you participated in (or would you consider) the SET or Micro-IVF program? What would your primary reason be for doing so, or not doing so?

 

Photos credit: jscreationzs/ http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=10018651

 

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 31: When Are You Too Old to be a Mother?

By David Kreiner, MD

September 24th, 2013 at 11:08 am

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Thirty-One: When Are You Too Old to be a Mother? You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=143

When Are You Too Old to be a Mother?

Over the years, there have been reports of women as old as in their 70′s having babies as a result of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) performed using donated eggs from a young fertile donor.  Immediately after these reports appear, I am bombarded with questions and criticisms about how wrong it is that we (somehow I am included as part of the responsible party as an IVF practitioner) allow women to have children beyond that which is not just natural but also reasonable. Those of us in IVF have had many experiences with making the news as this medical technology pushes to the edges of what society views as acceptable.

We are often put in the position of making decisions with our patients that have even larger implications to society than the individual patient.  I do my best to look at each patient and each situation as unique and treat them accordingly.  Regarding the age of a prospective egg recipient however we are dependent on the patient’s honestly reporting such to us.  Unfortunately, there are circumstances where patients have misled their doctors and in the case of one 70 year old mother, she had reported to the clinic that she was in fact 53.

Even so, it is the responsibility of the IVF provider to ensure that a woman is healthy and capable of bearing the pregnancy, giving birth and being a mother.  There is not an absolute age cutoff at which point a woman is universally unfit to undergo IVF and become pregnant.

My personal oldest woman I helped achieve a pregnancy was a 53 year old who delivered at age 54.  She had a normal stress test, EKG and was cleared by an internist, perinatologist and psychologist.

Some point out that beyond a certain age, it is unnatural to become a mother and that it puts the family at risk that she may not be around to help raise the child or that perhaps the woman lacks the energy and stamina to raise the child properly.  I personally struggle to separate my own feelings about the proper age to have a child which may be inappropriate for others who have a different perspective.  My responsibility as the physician is to the health of my patients, the well-being of the child and for the good of society.

Many women in their 50′s have the health and energy to carry a pregnancy and bear a child with no more risk than many women 10-20 years younger.  That being said, what about the risk that the mother may not be around to raise the child to maturity?   There is no question that a young healthy couple with sufficient financial support and emotional maturity is ideal to raise a family.  But, happy, successful families can take on many different faces.  Single parent families exist, survive and often thrive.  One can never be certain that the condition of the couple at the time of conception will continue through the child’s birth or for that matter until the child has reached maturity.  In addition, at least 50% of couples in the U.S. become divorced.  One can argue that couples at risk of divorce should not get pregnant.

I apologize that I cannot offer an answer to this question, when are you too old to be a mother.  For me personally, it is more a question of health …for the mother and baby… which needs to be evaluated individually for each case utilizing testing and experts to make the best assessment.  Otherwise, I feel it is an individual’s right to choose as long as society is unaffected or supports the individual in those cases where the pregnancy has a significant impact beyond the immediate family.

 

* * * * * * **  * * * *

Was this helpful in answering your questions about what fertility doctors might consider when questioning if an older woman may be able to conceive and carry a pregnancy?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 27: A Dozen Embryos, Who Will Stop This Madness?

By David Kreiner MD

August 12th, 2013 at 9:44 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Twenty-Seven: A Dozen Embryos, Who Will Stop This Madness? You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=133

A Dozen Embryos, Who Will Stop This Madness?

When I wrote this chapter, the news of the day was that an IVF clinic had transferred 12 embryos.  In fact, it was learned weeks later that this was a hoax.  However, in the wake of Octomom, where 8 embryos were transferred, I felt there was still an important lesson to be learned especially since insurance companies often insist that a patient try multiple cycles of intrauterine insemination (IUI) before covering IVF… if they cover it at all. 

 

In fact, gonadotropin hormones in conjunction with IUI offers a 35% risk of multiple pregnancy including a 5% risk of triplets or more.  After obtaining six fetuses after one such cycle, I became very wary of offering gonadotropin IUI cycles to my patients.

 

Yet, this is what our insurance companies are covering rather than the safer IVF where only 1 or 2 embryos can be transferred at a time.

 

When we do an IUI, as many eggs that ovulate can implant resulting in a high risk multiple pregnancy.  I believe that it is not until we discourage the use of gonadotropins without IVF by offering a regulated covered alternative will we eliminate these risky multiples.

 

Until then, all of us including society, the government, insurance companies and employers are to blame for letting these dangerous multiple pregnancies occur.

 

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about multiple pregnancy risks in IUIs and IVF?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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Fertile Food Friday– Red Meat

By Tracey Minella

July 12th, 2013 at 10:24 pm

 

recipe and photo courtesy of primally-inspired.com


Fertile Food Friday– Red Meat

Welcome back to Long Island IVF’s “Fertile Food Fridays”*! This is our third week of focusing on foods that can potentially boost male or female fertility. If you missed them, be sure to check out our first two featured foods…avocados and blueberries…covered the past two Fridays.

Next up to the plate…Red Meat.

Step outside at dinnertime most summer evenings and you can smell something good on the neighbor’s grill. And chances are it’s some kind of red meat.

Red meat is a great source of iron. Iron deficiency is common in women of bearing age and also can contribute to ovulatory infertility. In fact, a large study found that “women who consumed iron supplements had a significantly lower risk of ovulatory infertility than women who did not use iron supplements” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17077236 . More precisely, they had a 40% less risk of ovulatory infertility than those who did not use supplements. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/14/health/14fert.html

If you are trying to conceive, and suspect you may be iron deficient, ask your doctor to check your iron level. This is done with a simple CBC blood test to see if your red blood cell count is adequate. Red blood cells deliver oxygen to all the cells and tissues of your body, including your ovaries and uterus**. If your red blood cell count is too low, you may be anemic, and may be instructed to take iron supplements or make dietary changes. Never take any supplements without your doctor’s approval since too much iron can be harmful.

Symptoms of anemia** may include:

mild to severe fatigue
• chronic headaches
• dizziness
• brittle or weak nails
• decreased appetite
• low blood pressure

According to the Mayo Clinic, some iron-rich foods include red meat, leafy green vegetables like spinach, beans, eggs, dried fruit, and other items. In addition, eating foods rich in Vitamin C, like peppers, helps your body absorb iron. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/iron-deficiency-anemia/DS00323/DSECTION=prevention.

So this week’s recipe is a winner because it provides iron from steak and spinach, plus Vitamin C from the peppers to help you absorb the iron. Give yourself a break from those boring old burgers and try this amazing Stuffed Flank Steak, courtesy of Kelly over at Primally-Inspired. http://www.primallyinspired.com/stuffed-flank-steak/. <<<Get the recipe here. And while you are over there, check out Kelly’s other great recipes for those with a primal palette. Or here it is below:

STUFFED FLANK STEAK

4 or more servings

Ingredients:

1 ½ – 2 lb flank or skirt steak

2 – 4 T olive or coconut oil

4 – 6 oz mushrooms, sliced thin

1 shallot, diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

5 – 6 pieces prosciutto

2 roasted red peppers (from a jar or make your own), cut into thin strips

1 bunch of fresh spinach

1/3 cup blue cheese crumbles (omit if you cannot eat dairy)

salt and pepper, to taste

½ tsp smoked paprika

kitchen twine

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 350.

Starting with the long side of your flank steak, cut it in half carefully, but don’t cut all the way through to the other end (butterfly it). You want to cut it and open it like a book. Once it’s cut and open like a book, place a piece of plastic or parchment over it and pound it to uniform thickness – about ¼ of an inch thick.

In the largest skillet you have (must fit the rolled up steak), pour 1 – 2 T oil in the pan over medium low heat. Add your shallot, garlic, and mushrooms and cook for 5 minutes. Season them with salt and pepper.

Add the mushroom mixture to the flank steak, leaving 2 to 3 inches of open space on one of the long ends.

Add the red peppers on top of the mushrooms. Then add the prosciutto slices all over the red peppers. Then add your spinach all over the prosciutto. Next sprinkle the blue cheese all over the spinach.

Starting with the long end (not the end that you left 2-3 inches of space), roll up carefully.

Now tie kitchen twine around your roll about every 2 inches. Salt and pepper and sprinkle the smoked paprika all over the outside of the roll.

Pour 1- 2 T oil back in the skillet and turn the heat to medium high.

Sear your roll on all sides until browned – it takes about a minute each side.

Transfer your skillet to the oven and cook for 20 minutes (for medium).

After the 20 minutes is up, take it out and tent your steak with aluminum foil. Let rest for 10 minutes. For steak done more than medium: cook in the oven for 30 minutes, tent steak and let rest for 10 minutes.

To serve: cut off the twine and slice in ½ – 1 inch slices and enjoy!

 

Once you make it, come back and tell me how great it was!

*Disclaimer:Any recipe we offer is only meant for those who aren’t sensitive or allergic to the ingredients. Recipes are shared simply for fun only and nothing contained herein constitutes medical advice or a guarantee that eating any particular food will have any affect on your fertility.

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Do you know your iron level? Have any recipes high in iron-rich foods that you’d like to share? If so, please share it here. And if you try this one, let us know what you thought.

 

 

** http://natural-fertility-info.com/iron-fertility-anemia.html

Photo credit: Primally-inspired

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 19: Fertility Drugs Do Not Increase Risk for Ovarian Cancer

By David Kreiner MD

June 17th, 2013 at 10:22 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Nineteen: Fertility Drugs Do Not Increase Risk for Ovarian Cancer. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.long islandivf.com/?p=109

Fertility Drugs Do Not Increase Risk for Ovarian Cancer

I am often asked whether the medications we use in our fertility treatments can cause ovarian cancer.  In 2009, the largest study to date concluded that they do not.  Instead the data suggests that factors related to the diagnosis of infertility such as genetic or biological factors and not the use of fertility medications can increase the overall risk of ovarian cancer.

The study was reported in the British Medical Journal online February 5, 2009.  These data are reassuring but cannot absolutely rule out a very small increase in ovarian cancer that could perhaps occur much later in life, at an age beyond that which was studied.

A review of the specifics are in the chapter but the bottom line appears to be that fertility medications either do not increase the risk whatsoever of ovarian cancer but if they do perhaps at a much later stage than was studied and/or the effect is so slight that it still has not been detected.  Now that these medications as they are currently given or in their earlier form have been used for 50 years it is reassuring that data fail to demonstrate an increased risk for ovarian cancer.

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about fertility medications and ovarian cancer?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer.

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