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Archive for the ‘infertility podcast’ tag

Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 30: The Gift of Life and Its Price

By David Kreiner MD

November 9th, 2013 at 11:56 am

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Thirty: The Gift of Life and Its Price. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=141

The Gift of Life and Its Price

 

IVF has been responsible for over 1 million babies born worldwide who otherwise without the benefit of IVF may never have been.  This gift of life comes with a steep price tag that according to a newspaper article in the New York Times in 2009 was $1 Billion per year for the cost of premature IVF babies.

 

According to the CDC reported in the same NY Times issue, thousands of premature babies would be prevented resulting in a $1.1 Billion savings if elective single embryo transfer (SET) was performed on good prognosis patients. 

 

The argument often given by a patient who wants to transfer multiple embryos is that to do SET would lessen their chances and to go for additional frozen embryo transfers is costly.

 

In fact, if one considers the combined success rate of the fresh and frozen embryo transfers that are available from a single stimulation and retrieval, the success rate is at least as high if not higher in the cases of fresh single embryo transfers. 

 

At Long Island IVF, in an effort to eliminate the financial motivation for multiple embryo transfers, we offer free cryopreservation and embryo storage for a year to our single embryo transfer patients.  In addition, we offer them three (3) frozen embryo transfers for the price of one for up to a year after their retrieval.

 

IVF offered with single embryo transfer is safer, less costly and probably the most effective fertility treatment available for good prognosis patients.                     

 

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about single embryo transfers?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 32: Octomom

By David Kreiner, MD

October 3rd, 2013 at 6:57 pm

 

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Thirty-Two: Octomom. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=146

Octomom

 

A year ago, the Medical Board of California revoked the license of Dr. Michael Kamrava, finding he “did not exercise sound judgment” in transferring 12 embryos to Nadya Suleman, who already had six children at home. The ruling, while not surprising, was illuminating, and it’s worth reflecting on the five things we learned from Octomom:

 

1.      Know How to Say “No”: There is a point where physicians have to make a judgment call. Pregnancies with triplets – let alone eight infants – put the mother at high risk of serious medical complications and put unborn children at risk for developmental disabilities. Physicians need to rely on their professional expertise and experience to know when to turn down a patient request no matter how vehemently it is made.

 

2.      Beware the Patient with Tunnel Vision: Often when a patient comes to a fertility doctor, unsuccessful pregnancy attempts have made her anxious and determined. She might want to get pregnant regardless of the risks that pregnancy may present.

3.      Less is More: In 1999, 35 percent of all transfers involved four or more embryos. In 2009, only 10 percent had four or more. And those high-number transfers are generally reserved for patients with significant fertility challenges. In contrast, Octomom already underwent multiple successful IVF (in vitro fertilization) procedures and had given birth to six children when she had her 12-embryo transfer.

 

4.      Know When to Deviate: While Dr. Kamrava’s deviation from guidelines was an extreme departure, deviations do occur for specific reasons, such as repeated IVF failure, age-related infertility and poor egg quality. It is important to know when implanting several embryos is appropriate.

5.      “Reduce” Risk: Dr. Kamrava complained that Octomom refused to undergo “selective reduction,” which would have reduced the number of embryos she carried to term. Here, again, is an argument for fewer transfers. Had he transferred fewer embryos, Octomom would not have had to face such a difficult decision.

 

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Was this helpful in answering your questions about what could have been done differently to prevent the Octomom case? How much weight do you give your doctor’s recommendation on the number of embryos to transfer?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

no comments

Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 4

By David Kreiner MD

March 4th, 2013 at 9:59 pm

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Four: Where Do You Go? You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=34

 

Where Do You Go?

 

I try to help the reader understand the published statistics offered online by SART, the national organization of IVF programs that provides a registry of IVF programs who submit their data for audit by SART.  Rates are offered with a numerator and a denominator with the critical goal of a live baby per retrieval or transfer being the most crucial statistic.

 

The benefits and disadvantages of large programs are discussed basically offering that larger programs tend to have more experienced and often skilled personnel albeit with more waiting time for monitoring.  Some programs may provide more personalized care, some more psychological or emotional support and some offer adjunctive therapies such as acupuncture and mind body programs.

 

I emphasize the importance of the embryology lab as well as the skill of the physician performing the embryo transfer.  The technique of the transfer is described including factors that I believe may affect success rates.

 

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Please share your thoughts about this podcast here.

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Long Island IVF Podcast: Journey to the Crib Ch.1: Welcome

By David Kreiner MD

February 11th, 2013 at 10:24 pm

Welcome to the Journey To the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  You, the viewer, are invited to ask questions and make comments. You can access the podcast for this Chapter 1 here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=16

The first chapter introduces the reader to the writer, me, and my early experiences in the field of reproductive endocrinology, infertility and IVF.  This was during the early years of IVF and I was a new doctor driven by a passion for fertility; the science, the surgery and the new technology of in vitro fertilization.

I dedicated the book to my parents who were still alive when it was published.  They taught me the importance of family as it was the most precious commodity they owned.  My father recently passed but he was excited and proud of the work his son did even if he suggested making more revisions to my original drafts than I wanted to hear.  My mother, who suffered a ruptured cerebral aneurysm twenty five years ago and as a result has significant cognitive issues, remains my biggest fan.

It was with great anticipation that I sent to my mentor, Dr. Howard W. Jones Jr., this first chapter as much of it describes my impressions of him and his wife, Georgeanna Seegar Jones, the American pioneers in In vitro fertilization.  Today, he is 101 years old and remains the sharpest individual I have ever met.  I am proud to say that he was touched and impressed with my memories as I recorded them.

If you have not had the opportunity to hear him speak, please do yourself a favor and listen to any one of many videos recorded of him.  “Dr. Howard” describes how he initiated his efforts to develop the first IVF program in the U.S. on http://vimeo.com/asrm/howardjones .

I have a YouTube video discussing this pioneering couple at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b790aiFLzJI&feature=related

If you have time, Dr. Howard gives an exceptional speech on the future of fertility on http://vimeo.com/17418251 .  He starts speaking about 19 minutes into the video.

The reproductive endocrinologist who had the greatest impact on my career was Dr. Zev Rosenwaks.  I unfortunately did not sufficiently credit him with the huge influence he had on my career and in shaping the physician that I have become.  As Zev was a fellow of both Joneses at Johns Hopkins and I was a fellow of his, it is this family of Reproductive Endocrinology from which my career was born.  There is not a thing that I do in practice today that cannot be traced back to Zev or Drs. Howard and Georgeanna or to any of the other fertility giants that were in Norfolk in those days including Suheil Muasher, Mason Andrews, Annibal Acosta, Gary Hodgen, Sergio Oehninger and Richard Scott.

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Do you have any questions about this podcast? Dr. Kreiner would be happy to answer them. Please tune in weekly as we continue to cover Dr. Kreiner’s  book, Journey to the Crib, chapter by chapter. Back by popular demand.

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 32: Octomom

By David Kreiner, MD

October 18th, 2012 at 6:47 pm

Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Thirty-Two: Octomom. You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.longislandivf.com/?p=146

Octomom 

A year ago, the Medical Board of California revoked the license of Dr. Michael Kamrava, finding he “did not exercise sound judgment” in transferring 12 embryos to Nadya Suleman, who already had six children at home. The ruling, while not surprising, was illuminating, and it’s worth reflecting on the five things we learned from Octomom: 

 

  • Know How to Say “No”: There is a point where physicians have to make a judgment call. Pregnancies with triplets – let alone eight infants – put the mother at high risk of serious medical complications and put unborn children at risk for developmental disabilities. Physicians need to rely on their professional expertise and experience to know when to turn down a patient request no matter how vehemently it is made.

 

  • Beware the Patient with Tunnel Vision: Often when a patient comes to a fertility doctor, unsuccessful pregnancy attempts have made her anxious and determined. She might want to get pregnant regardless of the risks that pregnancy may present.

 

  • Less is More: In 1999, 35 percent of all transfers involved four or more embryos. In 2009, only 10 percent had four or more. And those high-number transfers are generally reserved for patients with significant fertility challenges. In contrast, Octomom already underwent multiple successful IVF (in vitro fertilization) procedures and had given birth to six children when she had her 12-embryo transfer.

 

  • Know When to Deviate: While Dr. Kamrava’s deviation from guidelines was an extreme departure, deviations do occur for specific reasons, such as repeated IVF failure, age-related infertility and poor egg quality. It is important to know when implanting several embryos is appropriate.

 

  • “Reduce” Risk: Dr. Kamrava complained that Octomom refused to undergo “selective reduction,” which would have reduced the number of embryos she carried to term. Here, again, is an argument for fewer transfers. Had he transferred fewer embryos, Octomom would not have had to face such a difficult decision.

 * * * * * * **  * * * *

Was this helpful in answering your questions about what could have been done differently to prevent the Octomom case? How much weight do you give your doctor’s recommendation on the number of embryos to transfer?

Please share your thoughts about this podcast here. And ask any questions and Dr. Kreiner will answer them.

 

no comments

There’s Something BIG Coming Next Week…

By Tracey Minella

April 19th, 2012 at 9:19 pm

If you’re here for the podcast, waiting with baited breath to hear Dr. Kreiner’s fifth and latest chapter of his book, Journey to the Crib, you’ll have to check back tomorrow…sorry! But it’ll be worth the wait. I promise.

And speaking of things that are worth the wait…

We’ve got something HUGE planned for National Infertility Awareness Week next week.

You are not going to want to miss it, so be sure to check in here next week at The Fertility Daily. But it’d be mean of me not to at least hint about what’s coming. So, here’s the hint: It’s a contest. Its grand prize, worth almost $4,000.00, could be a life-changing dream come true.

That’s all I’m saying for now.

And to those of you checking in for April’s ICLW…WELCOME!!

So glad you stopped by and hope you like it here and come back often. We’ve got a mix of doctor and patient posts. You’ll find patient perspective pieces from me, a veteran IVF mom, with “battle scars” and stories to share. As they say, no one can understand what you’re going through unless they’ve walked a mile in your shoes. (Of course I’m paraphrasing.) Well, I’ve walked a thousand miles in them. In fact, I’ve worn them out. I’ve even crawled a few hundred miles. So I “get it”. If you comment, I will follow you back.

We’re here to make you laugh with our weekly Wednesday photo caption contests, to cry with you, to help guide you with tips and new information, wherever you are on your infertility journey. You’ll also have access to our doctors’ informative posts on the latest medical fertility news. Feel free to ask them your questions! Check out Dr. Kreiner’s weekly podcasts on Thursdays. Want to read a post on a certain topic? Just tell us and we’ll deliver. We also post links to our blog on the Long Island IVF Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/longislandivf

So, mark those calendars to check back next week when we celebrate National Infertility Awareness Week with the kick-off of an amazing contest!

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Anyone have any suggestions for the smaller prizes/gift cards we’ll be giving away in addition to the big mystery Grand Prize? (And, no, Paris is not an option…)

photo credit: http://www.wpclipart.com/cartoon/assorted/xtra_cartoons/telling_a_secret.jpg

 

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