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Archive for the ‘IVF’ tag

Secondary Infertility and “Kindergarten Empty Nest”

By Tracey Minella

September 8th, 2015 at 9:03 am

 

credit: khunaspix/Freedigitalphotos.net


Maybe that first pregnancy came easy. Maybe it didn’t. But, boy did you want that baby.

Your first-born.

She made you a mom. Or a dad. He was the answer to prayers and the realization of dreams that began decades ago. You always expected to become a parent. If you struggled with infertility or losses beforehand, that angel’s birth was the sweet reward for your pain and perseverance.

But you wanted… more. And it hasn’t happened.

For years, you’ve wrestled with the thought of wanting a bigger family. Afraid to speak it aloud. Afraid to be judged ungrateful for the one child you do have. The one child you may’ve bargained with the Universe to have….the one you’d have sold your soul for. The single child that fertile folks and those struggling with infertility believe you should happily settle for.

But why can’t I have another, you often wondered as you savored every single minute of parenthood. Onesies and late-night feedings. First words and steps. Doctor visits. Bedtime stories and snuggles. Happy Mother’s Day and Father’s Day and happy every other holiday. Happy every single ordinary day, as well.

Until last week.

One minute you were at the bus-stop taking Facebook pictures and chatting up the other moms, as your firstborn …sporting a Minions backpack… giggled nervously with the other kids. The next minute a yellow bus whisked your baby away. And ran over your heart in the process.

How did this happen?

You returned to your empty house while the others pushed strollers home… your routine somehow disrupted. For the first time in five years, you may have all the time in the world. And hate it. What will you do to fill the 8 weeks hours until your baby comes home…or the 6 hours for those hovering “helicopter-parents” who covertly followed the bus?  How will you adjust to the new void in your life?

You suddenly realize that you really aren’t so different from the freshman college mom you pitied at Bed Bath & Beyond last month.

You’ve got kindergarten empty nest.

It is the price of secondary infertility. At best, it forces you to face the frustration over the ever-widening age gap between your first and potential second child. At worst, it makes you confront the possibility that what was supposed to be your firstborn may actually be your only child.

Kindergarten can also be tough on “lonely only-s”. Brace yourself for the inevitable plea, prompted by one of those early “All About Me” assignments: “When are you going to give me a little brother or sister?”

Just think…there are only 276 days until summer vacation. Not like anyone’s counting.

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Has anyone experienced Kindergarten Empty Nest? If so, what are your thoughts on coping with the adjustments it brings to you as parents and to your child? How have you handled it? Any tips?

 

 

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Infertility and the Irony of Birth Control

By Tracey Minella

August 18th, 2015 at 9:14 am

 

Photo credit: Ambro/ freedigitalphotos.net


What better day than National Birth Control Day to look back at the time when we used to use birth control? Can you even remember?

The embarrassment of buying condoms, the gynecologist visits for prescriptions. Oh, what we went through just to be sure we would not get pregnant. Because really, that would be the worst thing that could ever, ever happen.

Maybe you even experienced a time or two of sheer hysterical panic worry over a birth control “lapse”. Isn’t it amazing how totally opposite surviving that “two week wait” is from surviving today’s two week wait?

And the money wasted!!! Why, if we only knew then that we didn’t even need birth control because some sinister infertile force was lurking within, we could have dumped all that money into the future fertility treatment savings account instead. Heck, we could have steamed up all the car windows with reckless abandon.

When I think of the years on birth control, the irony kills me. I imagine the fertility gods laughing at me behind my back. Well, not really, but you know what I mean. I feel a little stupid, like life made a fool of me, and I resent feeling that way. Here I was the responsible one. We used birth control until we were ready to start a family. We had a plan.

Ha! A plan.

If we only knew.

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Do you ever feel resentful about the time and money you spent on birth control?

 

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Long Island IVF Announces Office Hours in the Hamptons

By Tracey Minella

July 22nd, 2015 at 9:41 am

Forget the beautiful beaches and trendy shops. There’s a bigger draw to the Hamptons. And it will last year ‘round.

Long Island IVF is happy to announce that two of its reproductive endocrinologists, Dr. Daniel Kenigsberg and Dr. Kathleen Droesch are seeing patients in the Hamptons. Until now, infertile couples in Eastern Suffolk County had to travel exceptionally long distances to reach us for fertility treatment. Now, those in the Hamptons area… for the summer and year round… will have the convenience of expert care closer to home!

For more information on the days and hours of doctor availability and to schedule an appointment with Dr. Kenigsberg or Dr. Droesch in the Hamptons, please contact our Stony Brook office at (631) 331-7575.

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How long do/would you travel for fertility care?

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Long Island IVF Hosts Seminar: “Family-Building the LGBT Way”

By Tracey Minella

June 15th, 2015 at 11:42 am

If you’d like information on family-building from a practice that’s been helping the LGBT community become parents for decades, we’ve got the event for you!

We’ve partnered up with the LGBT Network to bring you a very special seminar on June 25, 2015 from 7-9 pm at the LGBT Network Community Center in Woodbury, NY. http://lgbtnetwork.org/the-center

Long Island IVF’s “Family-Building the LGBT Way” seminar will answer everything you ever wanted to know about today’s LGBT Family-Building options. Two of our reproductive endocrinologists, Dr. Steven Brenner, and Dr. Satu Kuokkanen, along with other key LIIVF team members will introduce you to the fascinating world of assisted reproductive technology and how it’s used to help the LGBT community become parents. In addition, Vicky Loveland, our Donor Egg Coordinator and Melissa Brisman, Esq. owner and founder of Reproductive Possibilities http://www.reproductivepossibilities.com/ will be there. Ms. Brisman is a nationally known reproductive attorney.

LGBT family-building is different in many ways from so-called “traditional” family-building. As a practice made up of both LGBT and non-LGBT employees, we truly understand the nuances that make your family-building adventure unique to you.

Whether you met us briefly at LI Pridefest 2015 and you’d like to learn more about our LGBT Family Building program at Long Island IVF, or this is the first time you’ll be meeting us, we hope you’ll join us at the LGBT Network Community Center to learn about the many ways we can help you achieve your dream of parenthood.

Please pre-register for this free event by emailing lmontello@liivf.com. Light refreshments will be served.

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Will you be attending the “Family-Building the LGBT Way” seminar? Do you have any specific questions or particular topics you want to see covered?

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Long Island IVF-WINNER: Best in Vitro Fertility Practice 2015

It is with humble yet excited hearts that we announce that Long Island IVF was voted the Best In Vitro Fertility Practice in the Best Of Long Island 2015 contest.

The doctors, nurses, embryologists, and the rest of the Long Island IVF staff are so proud of this honor and so thankful to every one of you who took the time to vote. From the moms juggling LIIVF babies… to the dads coaching LIIVF teens…to the parents sending LIIVF adults off to college or down the aisles… to the LIIVF patients still on their journeys to parenthood who are confident in the care they’re receiving…we thank you all.

We love what we’ve gotten to do every day more than 27 years…build families. If you are having trouble conceiving, please call us. Many of our nurses and staff were also our patients, so we really do understand what you’re going through. And we’d like to help.

 

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Long Island IVF Brew for the Family Event Wrap-Up

By Tracey Minella

June 11th, 2015 at 12:20 pm

We’ve hosted some fun gatherings in the past, but the Long Island Brew for the Family 2015 ranks right up there among the all-time best. It was a SOLD-OUT event!

Last Thursday, over a hundred hopeful infertile folks… many joined by their friends and families… kicked back at the Great South Bay Brewery and enjoyed a night full of music, tons of delicious food, multiple samplings of craft beers, a brewery tour, vendor giveaways, souvenir glasses, and a silent auction. Many of the LIIVF doctors  were mingling with the crowd.  There was so much going on in this hip, relaxed setting that it may even have distracted the attendees’ attention—briefly– from the prize most of them came hoping to win… the free IVF cycle door prize donated by Long Island IVF.

The event was co-sponsored by the Tinina Q. Cade Foundation, a nationally-recognized charitable organization dedicated to helping people overcome infertility. The Cade Foundation fundraising events raise money for infertility education as well as for grants of up to $10,000 to off-set the costs of infertility treatment or adoption expenses. Many other regional sponsors also contributed, including Kings Pharmacy. Kraupner Pharmacy, EMD Serono, Enzo, South Shore Acupuncture and Fertility Wellness, Morgan Stanley, Acupuncture for Fertility, Counsyl, Damianos Realty Group, Suffolk County Acupuncture and more.

The event venue and theme was appealing to local infertile couples, who live with the stress of infertility. It offered them a chance to relax for a few hours and reconnect with each other or the friends who came to support them and help increase their chances to win the transferable free IVF cycle door prize. In fact, it was a brother-sister team who won the prize this year. The sister needed IVF and her brother attended to give her a second chance at the prize. Their shrieking, hugging and high-fiving celebration upon winning won’t soon be forgotten.

As happy as we are to offer this door prize to a lucky winner, our hearts did break along with those of the other hopefuls who came out that night. If you were one of them, we’d like you to know that there is still hope. We strongly encourage you to apply for one of the Cade Foundation’s Family Building Grants, which are awarded twice per year and allow you to use your choice of fertility practice. Because the grants are for up to $10,000 each and they don’t have to be repaid, it’s like a second chance to win that free IVF cycle. The deadline for the current fall grant program cycle ends on July 1, 2015 so please go check that out and apply today. All you need is to be a legal permanent US resident with a medical diagnosis of infertility. It’s easy. http://bit.ly/1GwCvXk

There are also several grants available at Long Island IVF, including the exclusive, new Jade IVF Grant, so please call the office and speak to a financial services rep for more details.

The doctors and staff of Long Island IVF thank everyone who attended or was in any way involved in the Brew for the Family event for supporting this worthy fundraiser designed to help overcome infertility. See you at the next big event!

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Were you at Brew For the Family? What was your favorite part?

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Why Kimye’s Conception May Have Pushed Your Button

By admin

June 2nd, 2015 at 8:07 am

 

image credit: Frame Angel/ freedigitalphotos.net


Are you an emotional mess this week? I think the top news stories have helped to stir the emotional pot for the infertile community.

In addition to Mother Nature serving up a cold, miserable Monday, the week opened with Kim and Kanye’s news of a second pregnancy. And their “struggles” with IVF.  News flash Kimye: Nobody likes a whiner. Especially one who already has one healthy baby, who hasn’t done IVF as long as many average couples need to, and who presumably has enough money to pursue IVF or any other family-building option they may have needed…if they didn’t get lucky to conceive so fast.

Seems many in the infertility community feel the same way. Why is it we’re not embracing this celebrity couple as the poster couple of IVF? Why can’t we get past the usual benign level of envy that others’ pregnancies bring and say, “Well at least they’re raising awareness of infertility”?

When talking to your average infertile couples, many will tell you that finances are the main obstacle to having a family through assisted reproductive technologies like IVF. So it’s natural to be jealous of those with unlimited funds. But why does this couple’s news push our proverbial button so hard? Do you think it possibly comes from a simple dislike of or a lack of respect for them, perhaps as a result of how they gained their celebrity or for their public behavior since becoming famous? Did that all make their brief “struggle” less sympathetic to us? Should we be more understanding?

Maybe it’s the impression that they don’t seem to realize how truly lucky they are to have conceived. Yes, that could be it. The apparent lack of appreciation for their good fortune and the miracle that is IVF. It may also be the feeling that, if history repeats itself, at any moment now we may hear complaints about what pregnancy does to one’s appearance. And that’s just too hard to bear. In fact, just the anticipation of those complaints induces a slow burn in the infertile gut.

Who among us long suffering infertiles wouldn’t care if we packed on 50 pounds, spent nine months on bed rest, and sprouted hemorrhoids just to be pregnant? Those who really appreciate the gift of pregnancy…who struggled for it… don’t complain about it. Ever. At least not out loud. It’s like that moment when Linus says to Sally “If the Great Pumpkin comes..” then gasps and desperately self-corrects “I mean WHEN he comes…” You just don’t speak of certain things. You don’t tempt fate.

Despite all the jealousy. Despite what will feel like the longest pregnancy ever being in our faces for nine months. Despite whatever else you may feel about the parents or the situation, any baby is a blessing. And we all know that deep, deep down.

That said, it’s okay to feel that life is simply unfair. Especially on weeks like this one.

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How, if at all, has the news of Kim and Kanye’s IVF pregnancy affected you?

 

Photo credit: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=10071616

 

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Is Clomid Right for You?

By David Kreiner MD

May 22nd, 2015 at 12:27 pm

 

Photo: imagery magestic/ freedigitalphotos.net


It has become commonplace for women who have been frustrated with repeated unsuccessful attempts to conceive naturally on their own to see their gynecologist who often times will try clomid therapy on them.

Clomid, the traditional brand name for clomiphene citrate, is a competitive inhibitor of estrogen. It stimulates the pituitary gland to produce follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) which in turn will stimulate the ovaries to mature follicle(s) containing eggs. Estrogen normally has a negative effect on the pituitary: Clomid blocks estrogen and leads to pituitary FSH production and ovarian stimulation.

Infertility patients — those under 35 having one year of unprotected intercourse without a resulting pregnancy and those over 35 having six months without pregnancy — have a two to five percent pregnancy rate each month trying on their own without treatment.

Clomid therapy increases a couple’s fertility by increasing the number of eggs matured in a cycle and by producing a healthier egg and follicle. The pregnancy rate with clomid therapy alone is approximately ten percent per cycle and 12 -15 percent when combined with intrauterine insemination (IUI). Women who are unable to ovulate on their own experience a 20 percent pregnancy rate per cycle with clomid, the equivalent to that of a fertile couple trying on their own.

Clomid and Your Cervical Mucus

Women who are likely to conceive with clomid usually do so in the first three months of therapy, with very few conceiving after six months. As clomid has an anti-estrogen effect, the cervical mucus and endometrial lining may be adversely affected.

Cervical mucus is normally produced just prior to ovulation and may be noticed as a stringy egg white-like discharge unique to the middle of a woman’s cycle just prior to and during ovulation. It provides the perfect environment for the sperm to swim through to gain access to a woman’s reproductive tract and find her egg. Unfortunately, clomid may thin out her cervical mucus, preventing the sperm’s entrance into her womb. IUI overcomes this issue through bypassing the cervical barrier and depositing the sperm directly into the uterus.

However, when the uterine lining or endometrium is affected by the anti-estrogenic properties of clomid, an egg may be fertilized but implantation is unsuccessful due to the lack of secretory gland development in the uterus. The lining does not thicken as it normally would during the cycle. Attempts to overcome this problem with estrogen therapy are rarely successful.

Side Effects

Many women who take clomid experience no side effects. Others have complained of headache, mood changes, spots in front of their eyes, blurry vision, hot flashes and occasional cyst development (which normally resolves on its own). Most of these effects last no longer than the five or seven days that you take the clomid and have no permanent side effect. The incidence of twins is eight to ten percent with a one percent risk of triplet development.

Limit Your Clomid Cycles

Yet another deterrent to clomid use was a study performed years ago that suggested that women who used clomid for more than twelve cycles developed an increased incidence of ovarian tumors. It is therefore recommended by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine as well as the manufacturer of clomiphene that clomid be used for no more than six months after which it is recommended by both groups that patients proceed with treatment including gonadotropins (injectable hormones containing FSH and LH) to stimulate the ovaries in combination with intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization.

Success rates

For patients who fail to ovulate, clomid is successful in achieving a pregnancy in nearly 70 percent of cases. All other patients average close to a 50 percent pregnancy rate if they attempt six cycles with clomid, especially when they combine it with IUI. After six months, the success is less than five percent per month.

In vitro fertilization (IVF) is a successful alternative therapy when other pelvic factors such as tubal disease, tubal ligation, adhesions or scar tissue and endometriosis exist or there is a deficient number, volume or motility of sperm. Success rates with IVF are age, exam and history dependent.

Young patients sometimes choose a minimal stimulation IVF or MicroIVF as an alternative to clomid/IUI cycles as a more successful and cost effective option as many of these patients experience a 40 percent pregnancy rate per retrieval at a cost today of about $3,900.

Today, with all these options available to patients, a woman desiring to build her family will usually succeed in becoming a mom.

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Did you start out with Clomid? Did you have success with it or did you move on to IVF?

 

photo credit: imagery majestic http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Couplespartners_g216-Young_Romantic_Couple_p75136.html

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The Fertility Awareness Opportunities Angelina Jolie Missed

By Tracey Minella

March 27th, 2015 at 11:57 am

 

 

credit: Paul Sherman/ wpclipart


Actress, director, humanitarian, ambassador, mom of twins, adoptive mom, wife of Brad Pitt. And she’s gorgeous.

What’s not to hate?

Oh, I’m just sort of  kidding. No, really. But despite all the good she does, there will always be haters. People who want her money, her talent, her babies, or her man. Jealousy can do that.

I don’t necessarily admire many celebrities… and that’s fine, because their only job is to entertain me, not impress me. But I am impressed with Angelina Jolie. She’s charitable with her time and money and seems pretty grounded for a megastar. And she uses her celebrity for good.

It’s been only two years since Jolie made headlines for undergoing a preventative double mastectomy after testing positive for the BRCA gene mutation… a mutation that significantly increases the lifetime risk of getting breast cancer. At that time, she was open about her decision and used her celebrity to increase breast cancer awareness.

Now Angelina revealed that she took those preventative measures to the next level. This time, she had both of her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed in the hope of avoiding ovarian cancer…another deadly cancer linked to the same gene mutation. Jolie lost her mom to ovarian cancer and said in a recent New York Times Op Ed piece that she doesn’t want her children to experience the same loss. Her openness is raising awareness of ovarian cancer.

But there is another untold story here, too…a fertility awareness story…and it needs to be heard.

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock, you know Jolie has six children. She adopted three children internationally and gave birth to a singleton and a pair of twins. Practically eliminating her risk of getting ovarian cancer is not the only result of her surgery.

The media is reporting that she can no longer have biological children. And Jolie acknowledged how hard her decision would be for a woman who has not completed her family-building. Perhaps because of the size of her family, this point seemed lost on the general public. But it’s not lost on you, is it? This surgery is a big deal. And before others who may not be done with their family-building journeys emulate Jolie and follow her path, some crucial missing information needs to be shared.

In fact, there are three opportunities here to increase fertility awareness and educate the public about advances in the field of reproductive technologies, namely PGD, Egg donation, and Egg-freezing.

First, there’s pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (“PGD”). PGD enables couples who are concerned about passing a life-threatening genetic disease on to their children to have their embryos pre-screened for gene mutations. This screening can only be done in conjunction with an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure, where eggs are retrieved and fertilized in a lab and the resulting embryos can be tested. Then, only those embryos that did not test positive for the mutated gene would be transferred into the uterus…virtually eliminating the chance of passing on that hereditary disease. BRCA is one of the many genes that can be screened through PGD. Long Island IVF offers PGD.

Second, there’s egg donation. If a woman has her ovaries and tubes removed, she cannot thereafter have a biological child…one created using her own eggs… however she may still experience childbirth. If she still has a healthy uterus, it may be possible for her, through IVF, to use eggs from an egg donor and the sperm of her partner or a donor, and have the resulting embryos transferred into her uterus where a pregnancy can implant and grow to term. Long Island IVF’s Donor Egg Program brought Long Island its First donor egg baby decades ago.

Finally, there’s the latest breakthrough in women’s fertility preservation technology: egg freezing. Egg-freezing offers an exception to the egg donor statement above. If… prior to removing her ovaries… a woman undergoes IVF for the purpose of either freezing her retrieved eggs (or freezing the embryos resulting from the fertilization of her retrieved eggs), then instead of needing donor eggs, she would be able to later have her own frozen eggs (or embryos) thawed and transferred into her uterus in the hope of becoming pregnant with her own biological child. Or if her uterus was unsuitable or absent, she could still have a biological child by having someone else carry a pregnancy for her. (Note: Surrogacy and gestational carrier laws vary from state to state.) Long Island IVF has an Egg Freezing Program.

These three fertility awareness opportunities, when coupled with Jolie’s breast cancer and ovarian cancer awareness, will further empower women everywhere to make better medical choices and take charge of their fertility and general health.

Shame on the haters. It’s wonderful that Jolie is open about her health in a way that raises awareness for others. She is a just a mom. A selfless mom who just wants to be there to see her children and future grandchildren grow up.

Is there something wrong with being proactive after tests show you carry a gene that could one day take your life, like it took your mother’s? Are the haters just jealous of her? Is she a hero?

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What do you think? What would you do?

 

 

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Additional Extended Evening Office Hours at Long Island IVF

By Tracey Minella

February 23rd, 2015 at 11:23 am

 

Did you know that Long Island IVF offered evening office hours? Well not only have we offered extended hours in all of our offices for ages, we’ve added even more!

 

Infertility treatment can be stressful. And while some appointments and blood tests simply need to be done in the early morning hours, there are times when an evening appointment is feasible and might be more convenient. Especially for those who work full-time or who might be taking off certain mornings for less flexible monitoring appointments.

 

We’re pleased to announce that in an effort to be even more accessible to her patients, Dr. Satu Kuokkanen will be available on Wednesday evenings in the Lake Success office, starting in March.

 

The hours, nights, and doctors covering these evening appointments vary for each office so check with your doctor or LIIVF office for the specifics. Or if you are a new patient, contact the office you’re interested in for more information.

 

 

 

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Is the availability of evening doctor appointments an important factor in your decision to choose a reproductive endocrinologist?

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Will You Conceive in the Chinese Year of the Sheep, Um, Goat?

By Tracey Minella

February 19th, 2015 at 8:40 pm

credit: Feelart/ free digitalphotos.net

You don’t have to be Chinese to appreciate the richness of that culture’s traditions and the mystique of the Chinese methods of enhancing fertility.

 

The Chinese zodiac consists of a cycle of 12 years, with each year being named for a different animal, and supposedly bestowing upon those born in that year certain characteristics which are similar to the traits of the featured animal.

 

It’s the celebration of Chinese New Year. The 2014 Year of the Horse is ending. Each year, the passage of one animal year to the next is clear and routine. Except for the year that follows the year of the Horse. This year. Why?

 

An apparent ambiguity in the interpretation of the term “yang” has led to a difference of opinion among Chinese people on whether the year after the horse is the year of the ram, sheep, or goat. But the Chinese zodiac symbol recognizes it as the year of the Goat, so we’re going with that.

 

Children born in the Year of the Goat will be among other things “gentle, mild-mannered, shy, stable, sympathetic, amicable, and brimming with a strong sense of kindheartedness and justice”. * How wonderful!

 

But despite these great Goat qualities, many Chinese people try hard to avoid having children born during the year of the Goat. This is due in part to a popular Chinese folk saying ‘Only one out of ten people born in a year of the Goat finds happiness’ (十羊九不全). While this may seem to be a silly superstition to many…especially to infertile couples who usually wouldn’t care what day or year their baby was born…there is a real concern among many Chinese that Goat babies will be followers, not leaders, and may be destined for failed marriages, unhappy families, and bad luck.*

 

So, in the spirit of seeking all the good luck we can get when trying to conceive, I offer these four tips taken from Chinese New Year traditions.

 

Make Dumplings: On New Year’s Eve, the Chinese often celebrate by eating dumplings called “jiaozi”, which translates literally to “sleep together and have sons” according to http://www.theholidayspot.com. If you’re not “culinarily-challenged”, consider making these challenging dumplings.

 

Sweep Away the Bad Luck: Then, sweep out the house from top to bottom with a broom and give it a good cleaning. It symbolizes the sweeping away of all the bad luck of the past year so the good luck can enter. I do this religiously every single year. It feels authentic. You must try it.

 

Wear Red: Wear something red. It’s the color of good luck and symbolic of wealth. The Chinese elders often give young ones red envelopes with money inside on Chinese New Year. Maybe you can start a new tradition and break out a red envelope and get your relatives to contribute to the IVF fund.

 

Hide the Knives: Put away the knives…this is good advice for hormonal women anyway. Using knives and scissors at this time symbolizes the “cutting off” of the good luck and is an omen of bad luck in the year to come. Remember this one at mealtime.

 

You don’t have to be Chinese to embrace some of the Chinese culture

and have some fun with Chinese New Year traditions. Wear red. If you’re feeling adventurous, try making a batch of jiaozi from an internet recipe. Or just buy some wonton soup! Try your hand at chopsticks. Surround yourself with the richness of red and gold. Sweep out that old bad luck and embrace the New Year that awaits.

 

Basically, do whatever floats your goat.

 

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Do you celebrate Chinese New Year or follow any other cultural traditions with fertility-related traditions? Would the characteristics associated with children born in a particular year of the Chinese zodiac impact your family-building plans in any way?

 

 

* http://www.chinahighlights.com/travelguide/chinese-zodiac/goat.asp

Photo credit: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Other_Holidays_and_E_g321-Chinese_Lanterns_p140201.html

 

 

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