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Archive for the ‘Miscarriage’ tag

Mother’s Day: 5 Tips on Surviving The Hardest Day of the Year

By Tracey Minella

May 10th, 2014 at 8:00 pm

 

credit: david castillo/freedigitalphotos.net


Infertile women face plenty of rough days each year… Halloween, New Year’s Day, baby showers, and our birthdays. But, without question Mother’s Day is, well, the mother of them all.

It is the day the whole world dotes on moms…and assumes that any woman of a certain age is one. That assumption, when verbalized, can make you feel like crawling away and crying. And it is even worse for those who have lost babies along the journey. Everyone from store clerks to the whole congregation will unwittingly wish you a Happy Mother’s Day. So, what can you do?

Here are five tips for managing on Mother’s Day:

·         Focus on your own mom. It doesn’t help completely, but it can be a good distraction. You don’t have a child yet, but you do have a mom. If it’s too hard to be with her for a dinner that includes your pregnant siblings and their 37 kids, then make separate plans to see her for brunch instead. If she’s far away, schedule a nice, long call. If your mom is gone, consider visiting the cemetery with a note or flowers, or doing something that reminds you of good times with her. Yes, it may make you cry, but it’s a great place to vent. (Can you tell I’ve done this?) You will cry on this day anyway. Go for happier tears.

 

·         Call your church or temple in advance. If you’re dreading how all the mothers are asked to stand up and be recognized at your place of worship… something that would be particularly hard for those who have suffered miscarriages or lost babies or infants…why not call ahead and ask the priests or rabbis to recognize and include those who’ve lost children in that definition. Or ask when that moment of recognition will happen and plan to arrive before or after that point in the services.

 

 

·         Make yourself a Mother-in-Waiting’s Day Card. You are a mother. A mother-in-waiting. Believe your day will come. But why should your card wait? You should sit down and list all the reasons you are going to be a great mom. Things like, When I’m a mom, I’m going to let my kid have ice cream for dinner sometimes. While you’re at it, buy yourself a gift, too.

 

·         Make a garden. It’s a great way to connect with nature and spend some quiet, reflective time alone or with your partner on Mother’s Day and for many days to come. Plant pretty flowers or maybe some healthy, fertility-enhancing vegetables. Populate it with little gnomes, wind chimes, or cherub statues. It could become your sanctuary.

 

·         Get a dog. Or a cat. If you’ve been seriously thinking about getting a pet, this may be the time to act on it. “Furbabies” love unconditionally and fill a special spot in the infertile heart. Is there room in your life for one?

These are just a few tips to manage the day, not to enjoy it. The fact is that it won’t really be enjoyable until you are a mom. So, do whatever you want or need to do to get through this day. Treat yourself well. Spend time with your partner. Hiberate. And stay far, far away from Chuck E. Cheese.

As a mother-in-waiting, it’s your day, too. Take it one hour at a time.

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What are your Mother’s Day plans? Any tips to help others get through it?

 

 

 

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Long Island IVF’s Complete Mind Body Program

By Bina Benisch, MS, RN

May 2nd, 2014 at 7:29 am

 

credit: david castillo/freedigitalphotos.net

With Mother’s Day around the bend, and Bereaved Mother’s Day coming this Sunday (for those who have suffered baby or child loss), it’s a good time to remind you of Long Island IVF’s many supportive counselors on staff, and to call your attention to the Mind Body Program and its benefits.

Bina Benisch is a Registered Professional Nurse and a psychotherapist with an M.S. in Mental Health Counseling. She did her Mind Body Medicine training at the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

Bina is the support group coordinator, patient advocate, and stress management psychotherapist for Long Island IVF, working with both female and male patients. Her groups are wildly popular, and she always has room for more.

Bina explains the Long Island IVF Mind Body Program and its benefits for those couples trying to conceive:

 

Life changes.  You’ve had your intentions, your hopes, and your dreams of where life would take you.  What you may not have envisioned is suddenly being a member of the population that struggles with infertility.  Being diagnosed with infertility – for any reason – “unexplained,” male factor, or female factor, can feel like a lonely, isolating experience for many reasons.  The fact is that most women never expected to be in this position, and this is often one of the most stressful times in a woman’s life.  Feelings of anxiety, depression, isolation, and anger can be overwhelming during infertility.  Often, anger masks the feelings of loss experienced month after month of trying to conceive without success. Infertility impacts on one’s marriage, self-esteem, sexual relationship, family, friends, job, and financial security. 

Our Mind Body Program provides a space where you can relax, a place where you are free to express whatever it is you are feeling … a sacred circle of connection and support.  I have been told by women who have participated in the Mind Body Support Group that they experience a huge relief by connecting with other women who really “get it,” who understand these unique feelings. During the sessions, I take part of the time to teach Mind Body methods to elicit the relaxation response (emotional and physiological relaxation).  In this way, you can learn to practice these methods on your own on a daily basis

 

 

In our Mind Body support group, patients experience the opportunity to share information, feelings, or their own personal stories. You may be surprised to see how your support can help others or you may be relieved to hear others experiencing the same type of thoughts and feelings as you experience. Often, the supportive nature of this group, and the connection that develops between members, fosters a healing process.
Feelings of isolation, anger, and stress are slowly relieved. Our Mind Body program focuses on symptom reduction and developing a sense of control over one’s life by utilizing Mind Body strategies and interventions which elicit the relaxation response. The relaxation response is actually a physical state that counteracts the stress response. You can think of it as the physiological opposite of the body’s stress response. We cannot be stressed and relaxed at the same time.

Therefore when a person elicits the relaxation response, the body’s stress response is halted, stress hormones diminish.  It is important to understand fertility holistically. Your mind and body work together, not separately. Therefore your thoughts have a direct effect on your physiology. When you are experiencing stress, your brain releases stress hormones. These stress hormones function in many ways. One of the stress hormones, cortisol, has been documented to interfere with the release of the reproductive hormones, GnRH (gonadatropin releasing hormone), LH (luteinizing hormone), FSH (follicle stimulating hormone), estrogen, and progesterone. In fact, severe enough stress can completely inhibit the reproductive system. Cortisol levels have also been linked to very early pregnancy loss. For this reason, it has been found extremely helpful when treating infertility, to include mind body strategies which help to alleviate the stress responses which may inhibit fertility.

All mind body methods ultimately cause the breathing to become deeper and slower. This causes stress responses such as heart rate, metabolic rate, and blood pressure to decrease. The way in which you are taught to elicit the relaxation response is through methods such as: breath focus, guided visual imagery, muscle relaxation and learned mindfulness, and meditation. Awareness of the mind body connection allows us to use our minds to make changes in our physiology. This holistic treatment – combining bio-medical science with mind body medicine deals with the treatment of the whole individual rather than looking only at the physical aspect.  The fact is, body and mind work together.

Let’s not forget the men. Men often feel uncertain about the ‘right’ way to support their partners, and don’t realize how they themselves are affected. We now offer our “Just For Guys Group.” In sharing how infertility affects the men, their relationships, and each man’s deepest sense of self, these men gain insight, and experience support during what can be an isolating and difficult time.

We invite and encourage you to take advantage of this unique area of support provided by The Mind Body Program at Long Island IVF. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/1bGAvNb

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If you have ever met Bina or been part of one of her groups and would like to share your experience, please do so.

Photo credit: David Castillo http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php

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“Happy Easter. We’re Infertile”: Kicking off National Infertility Awareness Week with Easter Survival Advice

By Tracey Minella

April 20th, 2014 at 11:56 am

 

credit: stock images/free digital photos.net


Like most holidays with a focus on children, Easter can be hard on the infertile. No baskets to fill or cute outfits with little bonnets to buy. And well-meaning but annoying family nagging you as to why.

National Infertility Awareness Week starts today. Maybe it’s the perfect day. If you haven’t shared your struggle with your family or friends and you’re leaning towards doing so, today could be the day. After all, you’ll be together. And someone is bound to throw the annoying baby question out there. Again.

Take control. At a loss for how to start? Here’s a script that works both as a response if you are put on the spot, or as an opening if you don’t want to wait: “Anyone know what today is? It’s the start of National Infertility Awareness Week. [Pause a second for effect]. And we want you to know we’ve been struggling for some time.”

No script needed after that. Expect some to be shocked, while others will say they suspected something was wrong. Some will ask questions. Remember, just because they ask a question, doesn’t mean you have to answer. Share what you want and if you don’t want to say more, just say “We’d rather not get into details right now, but just wanted you all to know where we’re at and hope you’ll be supportive.” Releasing the burden of “the secret” is empowering. Of course, only you know your family best and on rare occasions, the support you seek doesn’t follow. But in most cases, couples who open up about their infertility don’t regret doing so. 

Regardless of whether you spread awareness today… and in honor of National Infertility Awareness Week… Long Island IVF has a special treat this week for those trying to conceive. A free gourmet dinner and cooking demonstration, featuring fertility-friendly foods! Yes, it is free. Please join us for “Fun in the Fertile Kitchen” this Thursday night, April 24 in Islip.

Who couldn’t use a fun night out being catered to by a professional chef among a crowd that gets exactly what you’re going through? Registration is required, attendance is limited, and we have to give the chef a final headcount soon so don’t delay. You do not have to be a Long Island IVF patient to attend. The event details are available here: http://bit.ly/1pRhSan

Give yourself a treat this Easter. Call or email to register today. binabenisch@gmail.com or (516) 398-5248.

 

 

How do you handle Easter? Will we see you on Thursday night?

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TCM and Infertility Part 6: TCM Pathogens of Wind, Cold, Heat, Dampness, Dryness, Phlegm and Emotion

By David Kreiner MD

April 18th, 2014 at 10:27 pm

 

credit: stuart miles/freedigitalphotos.net


Welcome, to my new world where I often feel like Robert A. Heinlein’s “Stranger in a Strange Land”.  

UnIike Heinlein’s protagonist, I am not accustomed to eating the bodies of the dead (though some natural holistic purists may consider this act the ultimate in sustainability.)  But to the previously unexposed who’ve been brought up from a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) perspective, perhaps some of the Western Medical physicians’ practices may appear a bit barbaric.

In our recent Western Medical history such practices as lobotomy for psychological disorders, certain hard core diet therapies including high risk bowel resection surgery, and nearly routine hysterectomies for perimenopausal women would be considered potentially dangerous malpractice today.  However, if we thought drastic high-risk unnecessary medicine were a thing of the past, then consider the fact that excessive plastic surgery and some other unnecessary current Western therapies are more common now and have resulted in occasional deaths and disfigurement. 

Greed is a strong motivator and is one of the ills pervading our society… and the health care field has not been immune to its seduction.  Greed too often factors into determining the direction of treatment for individuals today.  Corporate greed is the reason insurance companies fail to cover many in need of health care and force physicians to see more patients than they have time to care for.  It is also a reason some providers order and perform some expensive and potentially risky tests and procedures.  

Western Medicine has had its share of iatrogenic disasters, yet I have seen many ill or infertile patients reap the benefits as a result of modern Western Medicine.  Even so, I as well as other physicians am left without answers all too often to explain or cure some of the complaints we hear from our patients.  For this reason I study TCM to learn its explanations and its treatments for some of these common ailments and complaints that elude the expertise of the Western physician.

I have been involved in the health care field for 37 years and I am quite comfortable communicating about pathogens such as bacteria and viruses and parasites and about pathophysiologic processes such as atherosclerotic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, pelvic inflammatory disease and endometriosis to name a few.   Today, as I study Traditional Chinese Medicine, I now read and speak an additional language.  

The pathogens of TCM are Wind, Cold, Heat, Summer Heat, Dryness and Dampness, Phlegm and an individual’s emotions.  They may attack from outside the body such as wind cold (the equivalent to the common viral cold) or internally as a result of a disharmony among one or more of the organ systems.  Emotions such as Grief and sadness, anger, fear, worry and even joy according to TCM can be pathogenic when carried to an excess and lead to a disharmony of an organ system or to a blockage of the flow of Qi which can result in dampness and other pathologic events or pathogens. 

These pathogens are the “root” cause of the individual’s disharmony resulting in the manifestations or symptoms.  For example, complaints such as fever, cough, sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, bloating, etc. ., are the result of these pathogens.  Interestingly, ancient Chinese texts refer to insects or bugs as being carried by the wind as a cause of some syndromes such as the Wind Cold referred to earlier.

There are also multiple ways to categorize and classify pathologic syndromes. They may be classified as cold or hot, internal or external, excessive or deficient or yin or yang conditions.  They may be identified as affecting one of the organ systems which are defined more based on their physiologic role from a traditional Chinese perspective rather than by their Western anatomic and physiologic identity that we learn in medical school.  There are four different layers of pathogenic attack from the most superficial to the deepest and most internal. There are even other theories of disease which may be used to classify pathology usually described as a disharmony affecting one or more organ systems.

The treatment prescription is based on the identified syndrome(s) and may be geared towards eliminating the root cause of the disease as well as the clinical manifestations and associated symptoms.  One may use acupuncture to tonify a particular weakened organ or Qi, yin or yang.  Acupuncture can eliminate heat or cold from one or more of the channels of Qi.  Or there may be excess body fluids in the form of edema, dampness or phlegm that needs to be eliminated.  Chinese herbal prescriptions are often given as an adjunct to the acupuncture to improve the efficacy of an individual’s treatment.

It does sound bizarre to this Western-trained physician, but I am impressed that the science of TCM has lasted thousands of years.  I imagine there must be something to this needling patients to modify the Qi in the body that has some benefit to the patients’ health and well-being.

I look forward to new adventures and greater understanding as I become more familiar navigating this strange land.

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Do you believe that TCM pathogens could be impacting your fertility?

 

 

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Acupuncture: What’s the Point?

By David Kreiner MD

March 12th, 2014 at 3:29 am

 

image courtesy of stuartmiles/freedigitalphotos.net

I have previously mentioned the conundrum facing a Western-trained physician embarking on the study of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).  It is part of our nature after a lifetime of scientific training to explain natural phenomena such as health and illness in ways that have been documented with physical evidence. 

The basic physiology on which TCM is constructed has no corresponding physical support that can be seen or measured…a requirement that scientific thinkers rely on to reassure ourselves about the validity and rationale of a proposed theory or treatment.

Instead, it feels to me as I study TCM that I am memorizing random “facts” with corresponding syndromes and treatments.  For now, I must push myself to continue my studies unconcerned that these basics I am committing to memory are not supported by any physical evidence other than the stories of successful therapies.  It is premature for me to pass judgment for as they say, “the proof is in the pudding”. 

In fact, as a practicing reproductive endocrinologist I have seen patients with poor ovarian function or previous failed pregnancies succeed in their child-building endeavors after acupuncture intervention is added as an adjunct to their fertility treatments. 

For this reason, I persevere to learn as much as possible because despite my own admission that TCM is difficult for me to accept as “scientific truths” I believe that it offers potential advantage to my patients as they go through their Western fertility therapies.

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How important to you is the science…or measurable physical evidence…behind an infertility therapy? Can you take a leap of faith and hope “the proof is in the pudding”?

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Acupuncture: What’s the Point?

By David Kreiner MD

March 11th, 2014 at 8:22 pm

 

image courtesy of stuart miles/free digital photos.net

I have previously mentioned the conundrum facing a Western-trained physician embarking on the study of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).  It is part of our nature after a lifetime of scientific training to explain natural phenomena such as health and illness in ways that have been documented with physical evidence. 

The basic physiology on which TCM is constructed has no corresponding physical support that can be seen or measured…a requirement that scientific thinkers rely on to reassure ourselves about the validity and rationale of a proposed theory or treatment.

Instead, it feels to me as I study TCM that I am memorizing random “facts” with corresponding syndromes and treatments.  For now, I must push myself to continue my studies unconcerned that these basics I am committing to memory are not supported by any physical evidence other than the stories of successful therapies.  It is premature for me to pass judgment for as they say, “the proof is in the pudding”. 

In fact, as a practicing reproductive endocrinologist I have seen patients with poor ovarian function or previous failed pregnancies succeed in their child-building endeavors after acupuncture intervention is added as an adjunct to their fertility treatments. 

For this reason, I persevere to learn as much as possible because despite my own admission that TCM is difficult for me to accept as “scientific truths” I believe that it offers potential advantage to my patients as they go through their Western fertility therapies.

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How important to you is the science…or measurable physical evidence…behind an infertility therapy? Can you take a leap of faith and hope “the proof is in the pudding”?

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Infertility Olympics: 5 Things You Have In Common With the Olympians

By Tracey Minella

February 10th, 2014 at 1:47 pm

 

public domain image source: defense.gov


Ever been mistaken for an Olympic athlete? You could be.

No, I’m not accusing you of wearing an ugly Christmas sweater that just happens to look like Team USA’s Opening Ceremonies uniform. And though you could be as ripped as a downhill skier or figure skater… chances are pretty good that you’re built kind of average.

So, you might be surprised to learn that you have five things in common with these elite athletes:

1.      Determination. You are determined to have a child. Not taking “no” for an answer. You know you want it desperately and are willing to sacrifice whatever it takes to get it. Financially, emotionally, physically.

 

2.      Focus. You have your eye on the prize. At all times. You know the steps you need to take each day, maybe each hour, and nothing will get in your way from taking them. Stay the course.

 

3.      Courage. You overcome the often overwhelming obstacles. You may have failed at some point along the road, but you got back up. No time for fear. Bring the next challenge. You are not backing down.

 

4.      Stamina. It’s been a long road. Harder than you originally thought. Maybe you’ve suffered setbacks or been broken.  You’ve been hurt or failed. You’ve taken breaks, but you re-grouped and came back stronger. The road bent but the journey continued. You brushed yourself off and got back on course. Even when no one would have thought less of you if you had quit.

 

5.      The Dream. You live it daily. It dictates all you do from the moment you wake until you go to bed. It manifests itself in tasks and thoughts woven into your daily schedule. It’s the routine you live by. The necessary grind. The pain required for the gain. The sacrifice you’re willing to make. You close your eyes and envision it coming true.

 

Are you really any different than an Olympic athlete? Sure, you don’t have the same arenas, anthems, or medals. Your arena is a hospital. Your national anthem is a lullaby. You’re striving for something far more valuable than gold–you’re going for the pink or the blue. And you’ve got heart.

No one has more heart, fights harder, or deserves to be on the cover of a Wheaties box more than you. So keep following that dream.

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Did your infertility journey take longer than you expected when it began? If so, how did you find the strength to continue and did you surprise yourself?

 

 

 

 

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Surviving The Two Week Wait for Your Pregnancy Result

By Bina Benisch, MS, RN

February 8th, 2014 at 10:28 pm

 

credit Petr Kratochvil/publicdomainpictures.net

 

It seems interminable. 

 

You’ve finally made it through your IVF stimulation. You’ve survived your injections and all those early morning monitoring visits…not to mention being poked and prodded for blood and vaginal ultrasounds. You’ve undergone your retrieval procedure, sweated out the fertilization results, and here it is – the day of your embryo transfer.  Or, if you’re doing IUI, you’ve made it through your insemination.

 

What a relief!  You can finally relax…. NOT so fast!

 

The next 10-14 days can seem like an eternity when you’re waiting for your pregnancy result.

 

Your emotions may ride that roller coaster … slow ascending hope, with glimmers of joy at the prospect that this time you actually may be pregnant … only to be violently interrupted by thunderous pangs of fear that this may not have worked, and then falling into despair.

 

How do you regulate your feelings and create a sense of balance so that you’re not held hostage by every emotion and negative thought that grips you?  Here is your mission for the next 10-14 days, should you choose to accept it:

 

·        Create a list of leisure activities that you and your partner have always enjoyed doing, and set a plan into action.  Yes, there are jobs and responsibilities, but schedule some “special” time together for these activities… whether it’s watching movies together, outdoor activities, date nights, music, or working together on a project that embodies a sense of satisfaction.  Not only does this help keep your relationship close – which in itself is emotionally enriching – but it may distract your attention and maintain some perspective on your life so that you are not feverishly focused on your fertility status.

 

·        Talk to your partner about your feelings.  There are no pat solutions which will stop your anxiety. However, making room for all feelings – even the darker ones – and knowing you will get through it as you ride this wave, will relieve the stress of suppressing these feelings. This will also keep the lines of communication open between you and your partner. 

 

·        Restructure your thoughts! This is not to advise Pollyanna or positive thinking.  Let’s face it, the last thing you need is to be told to “be positive” or “relax.” It’s extremely difficult to feel “positive” when you’re struggling with infertility.  However, take a moment to look at the thoughts you are telling yourself – the thoughts that are causing your fear and anxiety to escalate: “I know I’m not pregnant.”  “It probably didn’t work this time.” “What if it doesn’t work this time?” “What if I never become pregnant?”   These thoughts and statements are not etched in truth, and are only fear-based. Better thoughts… which may be equally true, but are not fear based…are: “I could very well be pregnant.” “The possibility that I will become pregnant is just as much a reality.”  Don’t fear that allowing yourself to entertain these hopeful thoughts will cause greater disappointment from a negative result. You will be disappointed or devastated either way, whether you’ve been fearful, anxious, and negative, or you’ve had the perspective that you may very well become pregnant.  Here is a mental framework that is absolutely realistic, true, and can go a long way to helping you maintain peace of mind:  “I am doing everything in my power to become pregnant, and therefore, I can emotionally let go for now, and leave this in the hands of (God, the universe, my doctors).” 

 

·        Selectively avoid situations that you know will trigger your fear or anxiety.   Learn to say “NO”.  People will forgive you for not attending a family function, social event, or any situation where you find pregnant people, or people with babies, or people who will ask you when you are going to have children.  YOU come first at this time in your life. YOUR emotional health takes precedence. 

 

·        Nurture yourself. Whatever that means for you. Massage, Reiki, reading, movies, shopping, yoga (not hot yoga), — what do you find to be a relaxing, self-nurturing activity?

 

·        Remember proper breathing. Slow, deep breathing will cause a physiological reversal of the body’s stress response.  This will reduce anxiety and stress.  Learn to practice breath work every day.

 

In essence, have compassion for yourself.  Talk about your feelings with your partner.  If you find it difficult to restructure your thoughts, practice the mantra that you have done everything in your power, and now it’s time to let go.  This takes practice, but you can do it if you take on this mission for self-balance, peace of mind, and equilibrium. 

 

 

Photo credit: http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=14919&picture=your-are-late

 

 

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To Qi or not to Qi? That is the Question

By David Kreiner MD

February 1st, 2014 at 5:27 pm

 

credit: StuartMiles/freedigital photos.net

It has been a month since I started my studies in Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture at the New York College of Health Professions in Syosset, NY. 

Why does this 58 year old Reproductive Endocrinologist want to go back to school for an additional career after practicing for 27 years you may ask?  Is it because I am jealous of my younger daughter starting the University of Michigan this past fall and I want to enjoy the Greek life?  Eh…I cannot deny the coincidence is suspicious.

However, my interest in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) dates back to my own college days. While I bought a copy of the “Barefoot Doctor’s Manual”, the thick red book sat on a shelf for years.  I never got past a few lines about “dampness in the lower burner” and treating “excess phlegm”.  After all, my goal was to become a physician and I liked wearing my clogs back then anyway.

TCM appears quite strange to a Western-trained physician.  The language is unique to TCM and bears little resemblance to the medical physiology that we are familiar with.  As I become more knowledgeable about the fundamentals of TCM, I am fascinated by the elaborate construct of ideas on which TCM is based. 

Unlike modern Western Medicine which is based on scientific study and experimentation, the wisdom of TCM was built upon hundreds of generations of experience by the wise healers of China.  Observations of thousands of cases led to the development of theories regarding disease, illness and healing.  To my physician friends who question the concept of treating pain and illness by impacting channels of Qi, a form of life energy, I ask them: Who are we to question the collective wisdom and experience of hundreds of generations of the wisest healers of China when Modern Medicine has been helping more people than it has been hurting only for the past 80 years or so?  I personally have seen many examples of accepted “Medical Truths” rejected and disproved since graduating medical school in 1981.

My goal is to help my patients any way I can.  Yes, I am a Western-trained physician but more than that I am my patients’ healer who is helping them in their journeys to build their families.  We have great tools in Western Medicine including gonadotropin medications, intrauterine insemination (IUI) and in particular In Vitro Fertilization.  But sometimes they may not be enough. 

I am reminded of the book and movie “Life of Pi”.  The protagonist, Piscine or Pi,tells his story about how he survived 227 days after a shipwreck while stranded on a lifeboat in the Pacific Ocean with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.  The official representatives investigating the incident reject his story as unbelievable and insist on hearing the “truth”.  Pi then offers them a second story in which he is adrift on a lifeboat not with zoo animals, but with the ship’s cook, a Taiwanese sailor with a broken leg, and his own mother. The cook amputates the sailor’s leg for use as fishing bait, then kills the sailor and Pi’s mother for food. Pi then kills the cook and dines on him. 

Pi points out that neither story can be proven and neither explains the cause of the shipwreck and in the end of each story the outcome is the same… that he still lost his family.  We are left without an answer as to which story is real. Why does it matter which story was true?  We are asked which story we preferred.

Similarly, with TCM, if we can achieve the desired outcome…in my specialty, the much sought after pregnancy and healthy baby, why does it matter if we do not fully understand the science or principles behind the therapy? The story we choose for that much desired baby…for our “journey to the crib”… can include TCM if it could help us to attain our goal. 

PLEASE FOLLOW MY TCM AND FERTILITY SERIES OF BLOGS AS I CONTINUE THIS JOURNEY.

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Do you think the blending of TCM and Western medicine principles could benefit infertility patients? Have you ever used or considered using TCM in your own fertility journey?

Photo credit: Stuart Miles http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php?id=10055066

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Infertility and the Snow Day

By Tracey Minella

January 22nd, 2014 at 7:48 am

 

image courtesy of adamr/freedigital photos.com


The sting of a snowball to the face is nothing compared to the pain infertile couples feel over snow days.

While many realize that child-focused holidays like Halloween or Christmas can stress out infertiles, few folks think twice about how painful a simple snow day can be. On many levels actually.

First, snow days effectively shine a spotlight on the childless at work. As the news announces the never-ending list of school closings, the workers with children start calling in sick or personal days to be home with them. Infertiles are often left manning half empty offices as the stark reality and unfair expectation looms “You have no children, so you have no excuse. They are mothers.”

Second, snow days leave infertiles empty on the home front as well. Facebook posts are killers on snow days. You have the complainers who moan about the inconvenience of staying home with their children. Or you have the moms-of-the-year who boast of sledding, cookies, and hot cocoa play dates with their kids. All of it hurts.

What we wouldn’t give to be making cookies and cocoa for our kids. What our partners wouldn’t give to be building snowmen or to have a helper to shovel the driveway.

And to add insult to injury, the blizzard-like conditions just add more stress to the morning routine of those currently in a treatment cycle. More stress on the way to morning monitoring and lab work. Getting in to work even later (and on a day when there’s likely fewer people to cover for you.)

Here’s hoping that those of you who want to… and can do so… get to stay home and pamper yourself with a well-deserved mental health day. And for those who must go out, may you find a path that is not only clear of snow, but also of sleigh-riding, cocoa-toting, cookie monsters.

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What is the worst part of snow days?

Photo credit: adamr / http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/agree-terms.php

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