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Archive for the ‘prolactin’ tag

Infertility Care: Starting with the Basics

By Steven Brenner MD

October 18th, 2014 at 10:52 am

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“Thinking the worst” is a very common reaction for individuals experiencing adversity.

This is especially true for people experiencing infertility. Concerns regarding the question of establishing the family someone has dreamed of since they were young is daunting and can leave a person with significant anxiety and doubt regarding her/his future.

In this context it is important to go back to basics regarding fertility and understand that many people suffering from this disorder will be successfully treated with relatively simple techniques and therapies. For the more severe abnormalities, it is comforting to know current available therapies can address these issues with great success.

Establishing a pregnancy without infertility treatment requires a healthy egg, functioning sperm and an anatomic path that allows sperm to ascend the genital tract and an egg to travel into a fallopian tube where fertilization takes place. The anatomic path needs to allow the fertilized egg to travel into the uterine cavity. A receptive uterine lining is then required for the pregnancy to implant and grow. To make things more challenging, sperm and egg have a very small window of time to find each for fertilization to take place.

Many couples have experienced infertility as a result of improperly timed intercourse.  This often results from the couple not being aware of the timing of ovulation and the short duration of egg viability. The “fix” for something like this is very simple, requiring merely an understanding of the basic physiology.  Sexual dysfunction can plague a relationship, but it is often not until fertility is compromised that couples seek treatment. The simple fix for fertility may involve nothing more than inseminations timed to natural ovulation. Much more in depth therapies may be required to overcome the other, additional concerns associated with sexual dysfunction.

Ovulatory dysfunction, while a very complex issue, is often very easily addressed with simple treatments. Weight loss or gain may be all that is needed to establish regular ovulatory cycles. Correction of hormonal abnormalities leading to problems with ovulation can often be treated with medications that do not require the intense monitoring of injectable fertility medications associated with in vitro fertilization procedures.  Sluggish thyroid activity and elevations in a hormone named prolactin are such issues that readily respond to oral medications.

A receptive uterine lining to allow for implantation of an embryo that formed in the fallopian tube is needed to allow a pregnancy to be established in the uterus. Although a scarred endometrium or one that is distorted from fibroids may require surgical repair, other disorders of the lining can be treated with local hormonal supplementation. The endometrium, the uterine lining, may not develop appropriately after ovulation secondary to hormonal abnormalities. This may reflect an abnormality in egg production and the hormones associated with ovulation.

Therapies directed at improving ovulation or directly supporting the lining of the uterus with vaginal application of the hormone progesterone may be all that is needed to correct this problem.

Anatomic problems such as scarring of the fallopian tubes may require surgical correction. However, blocked tubes may be opened by minimally invasive procedures at the time of a hysterosalpingogram (HSG). In such procedures, a tube blocked where it inserts into the uterus is opened with a catheter in a setting that does not require general anesthesia.

Many patients will be successfully treated with simple techniques and procedures that are not associated with the expense and invasiveness of the therapies that most people think they will require.

For each infertile person a plan of evaluation and therapy needs to be developed, beginning with the basics. It does not necessarily lead to those treatments that are more detailed and invasive.

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Did you put off an infertility evaluation out of fear of needing expensive, invasive fertility treatments?

 

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Infertility Podcast Series: Journey to the Crib: Chapter 6: Have You Had a Fertility Workup?

By David Kreiner MD

April 26th, 2012 at 9:16 pm

 

 Welcome to the Journey to the Crib Podcast.  We will have a blog discussion each week with each chapter.  This podcast covers Chapter Six: Have You Had a Fertility Workup? You, the listener, are invited to ask questions and make comments.  You can access the podcast here: http://podcast.eastcoastfertility.com/?p=43

 Have You Had A Fertility Workup?

 A fertility specialist called a Reproductive Endocrinologist, who has performed a three year fellowship training in IVF and infertility after an Obstetrics and Gynecology residency, will initiate the fertility workup by conducting a history and physical examination.  The exam includes a pelvic ultrasound of a woman’s uterus and ovaries to determine if there are any abnormalities that may affect implantation or pregnancy, as well as assess ovarian activity and the presence of endometriosis.

 Different causes of infertility will be tested.  The most common factor, that affecting the male, is easily tested with a semen analysis.  Tubal obstruction preventing a woman’s eggs from reaching the sperm can be ascertained by a hysterosalpingogram, a radiograph of the uterus and fallopian tubes performed after injecting radio-opaque contrast through the cervix.

 Other tests to better delineate problems in the uterine cavity may be performed such as a hydrosonogram, where water is injected through the cervix and the cavity inspected by vaginal sonography or with hysteroscopy, where a scope is placed through the cervix to directly inspect the uterine cavity.

 Blood tests may be performed to assess ovarian activity, in particular day 3 FSH and estradiol levels and AntiMullerian Hormone.  Prolactin and TSH levels are checked to rule out other hormonal disorders that may affect ovulation and fertility.

 Treatment can be directed at the cause of infertility, such as ovulation induction for women with ovulatory disorders or surgery to remove uterine polyps or it may be independent of the cause such as with ovarian stimulation and intrauterine insemination or IVF which will improve success rates regardless of the cause of infertility with some exceptions.  IUI will have limited success for tubal factor, male factor infertility and endometriosis.  IVF will have limited success in women who have diminished ovarian reserve or abnormal eggs unless they use eggs donated by young fertile women.  Today, there is a highly successful treatment available for all.

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